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Numéro de publicationUS1630869 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication31 mai 1927
Date de dépôt5 mars 1924
Date de priorité5 mars 1924
Numéro de publicationUS 1630869 A, US 1630869A, US-A-1630869, US1630869 A, US1630869A
InventeursSteinmetz Herman
Cessionnaire d'origineBat A Peny Corp
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Game apparatus
US 1630869 A
Résumé  disponible en
Images(7)
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Revendications  disponible en
Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

May 31, 1927. 1,636,869

H. STEINMETZ GAME APPARATUS Filed March 5. 1924 '7 Sheets-Sheet 1 51mm um: fx PLM auf snm.: BA1.; un' l Il V VEN TOR. m

H BY f V i ..1 Q1 ATTORNEY May 31, 1927.

GAME APPARATUS 'Filed March 5, 1924 '7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Z0 Z @l d@ @El @lg @El |91@ @xg 1,630,869 H. sTElNMl-:Tz

ay 3l H.sTE1NMr-:Tz

GAME APPARATUS Filed March 5, 1924 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 H vI/ENTOR. fcr//za/a BY ATTORNEY 1,630, 9 May '31 1927 H. s'rElNME-rz .86

GAME APPARATUS Filed March 5, 1924 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 I. vB

ATTORNEY May 31,1927. Y 1,630,869

H. STEIN M ETZ GAME APPARATUS Filed March 5. 1924 7 sheets-sheet 5 BY CWM/, Wi ATTORNEY 1,630,869 May 31 1927- H. s'rElNMETZ GAME? APPARATUS Filed'March 5. 1924 7 sheets-sheet s TQQ l BY M ATTORNEY' May 31, 1927. 1,630,869

H. s'rElNMETz GAME APPARATUS Filed March 5. 1924 '7 Sheets-Sheet 7 Fig/JZ HyVENToR.

Patented May 3l, 1927.

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narran stares PATENT ori-uca.

maman srnnmnrz, or nocnns'rnn, :mw Yonx, Assmann ro. sana-Pmi! oonroaa'rxoN, or nocnnsrnn. Naw Yonx.

GAME APPARATUS.

Application mea mmh s, 1924. amarre. 697,121.

My present invention relates to games and toys and more particularly to game apparatus4 adapted to be played in simulation of the game of baseball and it has for its obJect to provide a simple, eliicient and convenient apparatus of this kind that will afford the 4variety of plays occurring 1n the real .ame of baseball and means for accurately 1n leating and recording them. A further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus of this nature that may be played under the supervision of ain attendant for a prescribed fee with an' automatically timed period of play. To these and other ends the invention resides in certain improvements and combinations of parts all as will be hereinafter more fully described, the novel features being pointed out in the claims at the end of the specification.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a front elevation of a game apparatus constructed in accordance with .and illustrating one embodiment of my 1nvention;

Figure 2 is a top plan view of the playing table showing the ball ground represente thereon;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary slightly; enlarged sectional view through a resetting device on the line 3 3 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a horizontal sectional view through the table portion of the apparatus below the playing field showing the runways through which the different .plays are made and registered;

Figure 5 is a longitudinal enlarged section taken on the line 5-5 of Figure 2;

Figure 6 is a fragmentary view showing a changed position of certain parts appearing in Figure 5;

Figure 7 is another fra entary view showing another position o the parts appearing in Figures 5 and 6;

Figure 8 is a slightly enlarged llongitudinal section taken on the line 8 8 of Fige ure 2; l

Figure 9 is a transverse section taken on the line 9-9 of Figure 2;

Figure 10 is a transversesection slightly enlarged taken on the line 10-10 of Figure 2;

Figure 11 is a fragmentary view similar to Figure 10'but showing the pa'rts in another position;

l Figure 12 is a diagrammatic view of the lnation of a predetermined period.

ircuit arrangements of the 'electrical sys- Figure 13 is a detail perspective view of one of the, switch elements;

Figure 14 is a detail vertical sectional view through the'time controlled circuit closer;

Figure 15 `is a similar view showing the parts in another position;

Figure'l is a similar view showing the parts in still a third position and 55 Figure 17 is an enlarged fragmentary section on the line 17-17 of Figure 16..

Similar reference numerals throughout the several views indicate the same parts.

I will first give a general description of the nature of my invention to the extent of explaining the manner in which the playing of a game of baseball is simulated on the apparatus shown. rllhe latter is in the nature of atable having a playing field thereon over which a ball is fired by a projector that requires a certain skill on the part of the player to operate. Beneath the table are a number of runways into which the ball falls rom the far end `and. which' represent different plays on a baseball field. Each runway 1s provided with an individual circuit closing device adapted to be actuated by the ball. These respectively, illuminate various lamps arranged o-n the playing field to designate the players positions and also arranged on a boardthat indicates the different plays through the illumination of the lamps. It is intended that the apparatus, in its preferred form, shall be used for hire under the supervision of an attendant for which purpose an automatic timing device is provided that automatically traps the ball and' disconnects the source of electrical energy at the termi- Referring more-particularly to the drawings 1 indicatesa' table like frame supported at a suitable height on legs 2. The'frame constitutes a well within which the game .board and various working parts are located (Figure 8). The game board is best shown in Figures 2, 4 and 9 where it is indicated at 3, it being omitted from the showing of Figure 8. It preferably consists of a bed plate 4 on which is laid a picture 5 represent- 105 ing a base ball ie'ld and covered with a plate of glass 6, the glass and picture being set into the bed plate to lie flush therewith. It

is suitably supported in the well of the frame in spaced relationship to the bottom 7 of the 110 latter which is inclined and runs from end to end while the game board terminates short ofv the rear end of the frame. The board and picture, beneath the glass, are provlded with openings 8 and 9 provided wlth electric lamps 10 and 11 (Figure 5) which show through the glass when illuminated. The openings 8 are coincident with the deslgnation of the bases on the picture of the playing field the first base being indicated at 12, second base at 13, third base at 14 and home plate at 15. The lamps 10 are white while the lamps 11 are red, the latter indicating the players positions inthe outfield. The operating arrangements l hereinafter described are such that the white lights 10 in the openings 8 of the bases are illuminated to show the progress of a player around the bases while the red lights 11 in the openings 9 indicate where plays are stopped that is, where a put-out is made.A f

At the front of the game. board is a spring actuated projector 12 guided in the frame 1 and having an operating knob 13 which when drawn out and released is adapted to strike a ball 14 rolled down a track 15 in a relatively transverse path and shoot it across the board 3. The latter as shown in Figure is hinged at the front end at 16 to a bridge piece 17 spanning the bottom 7 while the rear end of the board rests on a cleat 18. As before mentioned, the game board is shorter than the frame '1, the bridge piece 17 being located at a distance from the front wall thereof so that the ball is permitted to roll of of the front end of the board and over the bridge piece and fall each runway, that is, at the lower end toward the front of the machine is a circuit terminal or pair of terminals 20 arranged on` an L-shaped insulating bracket 21 mounted -to rock on a transverse shaft, 22. The home plate light is carried on this bracket near its pivot while the other lamps are carried on a fixed platform 23. In front of each pair of circuit terminals is a pendulous switch member or circuit closer 24 one of which is shown in detail in Figure 13.` They are hung on trunnions 25 having bearings in the small bracket plates shown at 26 carried on the front of the bracket 21 and are provided with metal plates 27 adapted to engage the contact members 20 and close the circuit through them, the members 24 being otherwise preferably composed of wood. Each such member hangs in the path of the ball 14 as it rolls down the runway and as it strikes the switch it closes it and is itself halted as shown in Figure 6, the normal position of the switch being shown in Figure 5. This illuminates the appropriate lamp and the result of the play is made known. To release the ball, the swinging bracket 21 carrying the switch members 24 is raised to the position of Figure 7. This'is done by meansy of a push button 28 arranged in the top of the frame 1 at the front of the apparatus conveniently for the operator. This is in the form of a plunger having a surrounding compression spring 29 through which it is returned and which rests on the bracket 21 in such way that the plunger imparts a tilting pressure to the bracket through the spring and thus prevents the operator from operating it too harshly. After the ball is released it rolls down the bottom 7 and emerges through an opening 30 in the frame 1 into an exterior trough 31 on `the exterior of the frame from which it may be picked up by the operator and used over again.

Besides controlling the circuits of the lamps 10 and 11, the switches 24 close contacts 20 that indicate plays other than those that can be depicted on the playing field. Referring to Figures 1 and 5, a raised casing 32 atthe rear end of the table contains a front panel 34 provided with a plurality of windows 35 behind which are lamps 36 each one of which is on one of the runway circuits adapted to be closed at 20. These are actually labeled Double play Error, Stolen base, etc., as shown and when the ball rolls down the corresponding runway it registers one of these plays by lighting the lamp.` If it lights one of the white lights 10 on the bases an` advancement of the runner to that point is indicated while if one of the red lights 11 in the players positions is lighted it indicates that the player has been stopped or a put-out made at that particular point as before described.

Referring more particularly to Figures 2 and 9, I provide in each side wall of the frame 1 a small pocket 37 ,l and a larger pocket 38 the bottoms of which are slightly below the board 3 and in which the ball may be trapped if it is projected off at anangle. The one counts merely as a foul and the other as an out as indicated though no lights need be used in this connection.

The casing 32 is also provided with three indicator apertures and lamps 39 for keep-` ing count of the number of men on bases following a Cplay and with three indicator apertures an lamps 40 for keeping count of the number of outs. These lights are turned on manually to burn during the inning and are respectively in the circuits of ordinary hand operated switches 41 and 42 arranged conveniently on the frame 1.

1 frame 41 having an arm 46 connected to a pull rod 47. This latter is in turn connected to a bell crank lever 48 operating a pull rod 49 connected to levers 50 on the barriers 43. After the gamer has rogressed sutilciently, the operating vmemer 45 1s turned back andthe barriers straightened out so that the extra plays may be included.

AIt is contemplated that the game inthe embodiment shown may be hired for use in the manner of-a pool or billiard table under the supervision of an attendant. A stated sum would be paid for the use of the game apparatus for a specied time suiicient to complete the nine innings of a ball game. In order to stop the play at the termination of this. period I provide an automatic timing device that cuts oif the source 'of electric current at the proper time. This is housed partly within the casing 32 and partly with- 1n an extension 51 thereof. In addition to breaking the operating-circuit it also actuates means for trapping the laying ball. This last mentioned meansem odies a tilting frame 52 (Figure 5) pivoted at 53 and connected by a link 54 withan arm 55 on a long crank rod 56 supported on the platform 23. An arm 57 at the opposite end of the crank is connected by a link 58 with a mercuryl cup 59 so that as the latter is raised and loweredthe frame 52 `is oscillated between the full line of Figure 5 and the dotte line operative position in which it halts the ball in any one of the runways 19 before it can reach the switch member 24.

Referring to Figures 10 and 11 the mercury cup 59 is slidablevertically through an attached guide bracket 60 on a rod 61. Projecting into the cup from above is a fixed sealed tube 62 having circuit terminal wires 63 exposed on the interior-thereof. v When the cup 59 is raised suiliciently the mercury therein surrounds the tube as shown in Figure 14 but the air trap therein prevents 1t from running up into the interior of the tube and closing the circuit through the terminals 63. A vent tube 64 (Figure 17) is, vhowever, provided and the escape of air therethrough controlled by 'a needle valve 65.

' The slow escape of the air through this tube finally allows the mercury to reach the terminal and close the circuit.

The mercury cup 59 is carried on .an arm glaying lposition 66 of a link 67 suitably guided in the bracket 68 that carries the sealed tube 62 which link 1s pivoted to a lever 69 vpivoted at 70 to a plate 71 on the bracket and counterweighted at 72. The counterweight tends to raise the mercury cup 59against the air pressure and 1 hold it there when the lever is depressed but in the normal position of Figure 11 the mercury cup is lowered being heavier than the counterweight. The lever 69 is depressed by means of a push rod 73 terminating in an exterior operating button 74 and returned by a spring 75 in a casing 76 in which the ush rod is guided. `This depression of the ever to the position of Figure 10 carries the cup 59 up 'to its'extreme elevated position of air com ression in the terminal tube'where 1t 1s hel by a detent 77 pivoted-at 78 to an arm 79 of the bracket said detent engaging in a notch l in the link 67. A stop arm 81 on the detent 77 cooperating with'a fixed sto arm 82 on the bracket 68 through the me ium ofthe set screws shown determines Ythe extent of engagement and point of release of the detent. The detent is withdrawn by a solenoid 83- the circuit of which 1s controlled by the terminals l63 in the mercur'y` cup and therefore the closing of the circuit by the mercury drops the mercury cup and operates the frame 52 to trap the ball. The lowered position of the cup is shown in Figure 16. The set screws 84 of the detent 77 also constitute a switch vor circuit breaker which controls all of the other operating circuits of the apparatus s0 that these are broken also when the mercury cup falls terminating the period of play. The circuit arrangements are shown diagrammatically in Figure 12 and are as follows:

The source of current is indicated at 85 as a transformer in which a lighting circuit voltage is reduced to the six or eight volts necessary to operate the apparatus. When the ball 14 closes the circuit through a pair of contacts 20, say the short stop position indicated at A, it runs from the| transformer 85 through wire 86, contacts 84, wire 87, Wire '88, wire 89, light A11, wire 90, contacts A20,

cuit breaker 84, wire 87, wire 93, lampB,

wire 94, contacts G20, wire 95, wire 92 and back to the transformer.

When the .timing device has operated the circuits are broken through the contacts 84 Vfor the reason that a circuit is set up from transformer 85, wire 96, terminals 63, wire v luminated playing positions thereon including electric lamps, of switchesk in the circuits of said lamps and a projectile adapted to traverse the playing eld and to subsequently gravitate to a position at which it will operate one of said switches, the latter forming a stop for the projectile.` '2. AIn a game apparatus, the combination with a game board representing a base ball v field, and a projectile adapted to be rolled with a gamev boar upon the same, of a pluralit of runways into which the projectile may all by chance, a plurality of corresponding play indicators for the runways, and means actuated by the projectile while traversing the runway `forV operating said indicators, said means forming a stop for the projectile'in the path of the runway.

3. In a game apparatus, the combination with a game board representing a base ball field, and aprojectile adapted to be rolle'd upon the same, of a plurality of lrunways into which the projectile may fall by chance,

a plurality'of corresponding'electrically operated play indicators located upon the eld and circult closers for the indicators arranged in therunways and adapted to be actuated by the projectile and to form stops for the latter.

4. In a game apparatus, the combination with a game board representing a base ball field, and a projectile adapted to traverse the same, of a plurality of runways into which the projectile may fall by chance, a plurality .of corresponding electric lamps indicating upon the ield various baseball plays .corresponding to the runways, and circuit closersl for the lamps arranged in the runways and adapted to be operated by the projectile and to form stops vfor the latter. f j

5. In a game apparatus, the combination representing a base ball field, and a projectile adapted to traverse the same, of a. plurality of runways into which the rojectile may fall by chance, a plurality o; corresponding electric lamps arranged in the playing positions on the ball iield, and circuit closers for the lamps arranged in the respective runways and adapted to be operated by the projectile.`

6. In a game apparatus, the combination with a gameboard representing a base ball field, and a projectile adapted to be rolled yLeaoasee upon the same, of a` plurality of runwaysbeneath the field into which the projectile may fall by chance, a plurality of corresponding play indicators for the runways, means actuated by the projectile while traversing the runways for operating the indicatorsvand adapted to trap the projectileV and manually operable means for releasing the latter.

7.*In a game apparatus, the combination with a game board representing a base ball field, and a projectile adapted to be rolled upon the same, of a plurality ofrunways beneath the field into which the projectile may fall b chance, a plurality of corresponding electrlcally operated lay indicators for the runways, circuit terminals for the indicators, v

and a swlnging circuit closer lfor each pair of such terminals arranged in eachv runway and adapted to be actuated by the projectile when it falls therein.

8. In a game apparatus, the combination with a game board representing a baseball field, and a projectile adapted to traverse the same and to fall from the far end thereof, means connected with the board for imparting a rolling movement to the projectile across the field, of a plurality of runways into which the, projectile may fall by chance arranged beneath said game board,. a plurality of corresponding play indicators 'for the runwa s and means actuated by the projectileillr operating the indicators.

9. In a game apparatus, the combination 4with a game board representing a baseball field, and a projectile adapted to roll upon the same and to fall from the far end thereof, of a plurality of runways into which the projectile may fall by chance arran ed beneath said game board, a plurality o corresponding playindicators for the runways embodying electric lamps arranged in playing positions on the game board and a circuit closer in each runway adapted to be actuated by lamps.

10. In a ga'me apparatus, the combination with a game board representing a baseball iield, and a projectile adapted to roll upon the same and to fall from the far end thereof, of a plurality yof runways into which the projectilemay fall byv chance arranged beneath'said game board, a plurality of corresponding play indicators for thel runways, comprising electric lamps arranged partly'in playing positions on the game board and partly in another exposed position, and a circuit closer in each runway adapted to be actuated by the projectile to light one of the lamps.

11. In a game apparatus,ethe combination with a game boardrepresenting a baseball field, and a projectile adapted to roll upon the same and to fall from the far end thereof, of a luralty of runways into which the the projectile to light one of the project e may fall by chance arranged be- `respgnding play indicators for the runways, em

dying electric lamps, a tiltable framev carrylng a plurality of pairs of circuit ter-v minals for the respective lamps, and a swinging circuit closer on the frame for eachA pair 'ofte'rminals and each runway adapted` to be actuated by thel projectile.

12. In a game apparatus, the combinationwith a game board representing a baseball field, and a projectile adapted to roll upon the same and to fall from the far end thereof, of a plurality of runways into which the projectile may fall by chance arranged beneath said game board, a lurality .of corr ending p enesiodying electric lamps, a tiltable frame carrying a Iluraliigy of pairs of circuit terminals for t e respective lamps, a swinging circuit closer on the frame for each 4pair of terminals and each runway adapted to be actuated by the projectile and to be trapped thereby, and means for tilting the :frame to release the projectile. Y j v 13. In a 'game apparatus, the combination with -a game boar a projectile adapted to be rolled upon-the same and runways into which the projectile is adapted to fall 4by chance, of a plurality of lay indicators, operatmg means therefor a apted to be actuated by the projectile while in the respective runways and pockets arranged laterally' ay indicators or the runways Y of the game board in which the' projectile is adapted to b e tralpped when it traverses,

the latter at an ang j l v 14:. In a game a paratus, the combination with a ame boar representing a base ball field an a projectile adapted to roll upon the same, o a plurality of runways into which the projectile mayI iall `by chance, a plurality of correspondmg pla indicators for the runways, means actuate by the projectile in the runways for operatin the indieators, means for blockin the rojectile in the runways before it rea es t e actuators and a. time controlled mechanism for i' operating the blocking means. v

15. In 'a game apparatus, the combination with av game board representing a baseball field and a pro'ectile adapted to traverse the same, of a p urality of electrical devices for indicating baseball to be actuated by the projectile, a .circuit breaker for the circuits of said devices, and a timing device for operating the circuit breaker.

plays and adapted Y 16. A game comprising an alley, a chute v under saidl alley to receive a ball from the `same, ball-receiving pockets at the lower end enters. HERMAN STEINMETZ.

Référencé par
Brevet citant Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
US2435141 *31 mai 194427 janv. 1948Wolgen CompanyAmusement game
US4519610 *12 août 198328 mai 1985Kallio Leo WSimulated baseball game
US5366427 *23 oct. 199122 nov. 1994Price Ii BillExercise game system
US5637061 *25 août 199410 juin 1997Price, Ii; BillExercise game system
US6090019 *9 juin 199718 juil. 2000Price II BillExercise game system
Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis273/108.31, 273/119.00A
Classification internationaleA63F7/06
Classification coopérativeA63F7/0608
Classification européenneA63F7/06A1