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Numéro de publicationUS20050037827 A1
Type de publicationDemande
Numéro de demandeUS 10/638,707
Date de publication17 févr. 2005
Date de dépôt11 août 2003
Date de priorité11 août 2003
Numéro de publication10638707, 638707, US 2005/0037827 A1, US 2005/037827 A1, US 20050037827 A1, US 20050037827A1, US 2005037827 A1, US 2005037827A1, US-A1-20050037827, US-A1-2005037827, US2005/0037827A1, US2005/037827A1, US20050037827 A1, US20050037827A1, US2005037827 A1, US2005037827A1
InventeursDavid Perkins
Cessionnaire d'originePerkins David M.
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Computerized trivia game having golf environment
US 20050037827 A1
Résumé
A trivia game is provided, capable of being executed on a computer or game console. The game has a plurality of trivia topics and a plurality of questions within each topic, the questions ranging in the level of difficulty from relatively easy to relatively difficult. The game performs the steps of randomly selecting one trivia topic from the plurality of topics, asking a question based on a predetermined level of difficulty within the topic, timing the response to the question, receiving a response to the question, and providing a precise advancement calculated from both the speed and the accuracy of the response.
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Revendications(19)
1) A trivia game, capable of being executed on a computer or game console, the game having a plurality of trivia topics and a plurality of questions within each topic, the questions ranging in the level of difficulty from relatively easy to relatively difficult, the game performing the steps of:
a. displaying a sport environment and a sport figure that is the subject of the sport environment, the sport figure being in a particular location on the sport environment;
b. randomly selecting one trivia topic from the plurality of topics;
c. asking a question, where the difficulty of the question is probabilistically related to a predetermined gauge;
d. timing the response to the question;
e. receiving a response to the question;
f. providing advancement based upon both the speed and accuracy of the received response, and probabilistically based upon the location of the sport figure.
2) The game of claim 1, where the sport environment comprises a golf course, the course having a ball, at least one hole, the hole having a tee, a fairway, a green, a pin, and a cup, the game having a plurality of golf clubs, each club having a different swingweight, where a club with a greater swingweight sends the ball a predetermined distance, where the distance is farther on the hole than a club with a lesser swingweight, the game performing the steps of:
a. locating a ball at a predetermined first position on a hole;
b. having a club chosen to drive the ball towards the pin;
c. asking a trivia question, where the difficulty of the question is probabilistically related to the weight of the chosen club;
d. responsive to receiving a correct answer to the trivia question:
i. increasing the recorded value of the number of swings on the hole by one; and
ii. placing the ball at a second position, between the first position and the pin, where the position is at least a predetermined minimum distance towards the pin;
e. responsive to receiving an incorrect answer to the trivia question:
i. increasing the recorded value of the number of swings on the hole by one.
3) The game of claim 2, wherein if the player is outside the green, then the timer having a first predetermined maximum time for answering the question, wherein responsive to receiving the correct answer the question, the game performing the steps of:
a. calculating the unused time for responding to the question, multiplying that value by a predetermined factor, and adding the result to the predetermined distance for the club;
b. wherein if the calculated yardage places the ball outside the green, then advancing the ball towards the pin by the calculated distance.
4) The game of claim 3, wherein the course having a plurality of trouble spots comprises rough and sand, and if the calculated yardage places the ball on the green, then:
a. calculating the time taken to answer the question, and:
i. if the time taken to answer the question was less than a predetermined time, and the ball was not in the rough or sand, placing the ball in the hole;
ii. if the time taken to answer the question was greater than a predetermined time, or the ball was in the rough or sand:
1. multiplying the time by a predetermined factor;
2. placing the ball on the green at a distance to the hole being equal to the calculated time;
3. presenting a question having a difficulty that is proportional to the distance from the pin.
5) The game of claim 4, wherein the plurality of trouble spots comprises out of bounds, in water, ricocheting off of an object, or behind an object, where responsive to receiving an incorrect answer to the question or no answer to the question in the first period of time:
a. placing the ball from the first position to a trouble spot;
i. wherein if the trouble spot is out of bounds then the program performs the step of placing the ball in the first position; and
ii. wherein if the trouble spot is in water, then the program performs the step of placing the ball at a location on the hole where the ball crossed into the water;
b. wherein responsive to receiving no answer to the question in the first period of time:
i. increasing the recorded value for swings on the hole by one.
6) The game of claim 5, having a second predetermined maximum time for answering the question, the second time being less than the first predetermined time, wherein if the trouble spot is the rough or sand then the program performing the step of:
a. timing the response to a next question on the hole by the second predetermined time.
7) The game of claim 6, wherein responsive to receiving an answer:
a. if the number of total swings on the hole has reached 10, then:
i. if the hole is the 18th hole, ending the game; and
ii. if the hole is not the 18th hole, advancing to the next hole.
8) The game of claim 7, wherein responsive to putting the ball into the hole:
a. if the hole is the 18th hole, ending the game; and
b. if the hole is not the 18th hole, advancing to the next hole.
9) The game of claim 8, where the program performs the steps of:
a. recommending a club for a question;
b. displaying the correct answer when a question is answered incorrectly;
c. providing nature sounds; and
d. commenting after each answer.
10) The game of claim 2, wherein, if the player is on the green, then presenting a question having a difficulty that is proportional to the distance to the pin.
11) The game of claim 10, wherein:
a. responsive to receiving the correct answer to the question, the game performing the steps of:
i. placing the ball within the hole;
ii. increasing the number of recorded swings by a predetermined amount; and
b. responsive to receiving the incorrect answer to the question, the game performs the steps of:
i. allowing the time to continue running;
ii. advancing the ball half way to the pin;
iii. increasing the number of recorded swings by a predetermined amount.
12) The game of claim 11, wherein responsive to receiving an answer:
a. if the number of total swings on the hole has reached 10, then:
i. if the hole is the 18th hole, ending the game; and
ii. if the hole is not the 18th hole, advancing to the next hole;
b. if the number of strokes on the green has reached 5, then:
i. if the hole is the 18th hole, ending the game; and
ii. if the hole is not the 18th hole, advancing to the next hole.
13) The game of claim 12, wherein responsive to putting the ball into the hole:
a. if the hole is the 18th hole, ending the game; and
b. if the hole is not the 18th hole, advancing to the next hole.
14) The game of claim 13, where the program performs the steps of:
a. selecting a club for a question;
b. displaying the correct answer when a question is answered incorrectly;
c. providing nature sounds; and
d. commenting after each answer.
15) A trivia golf game, capable of being played on a computer or game console, the game having a preliminary screen, the screen having:
a. a location capable of receiving an identity;
b. a check box capable of activating or deactivating background sound;
c. a check box capable of activating or deactivating the showing of a correct answer;
d. a check box capable of activating or deactivating program comments;
e. a check box capable of activating or deactivating an automatic selection of a club;
f. a list of available courses capable of being engaged for picking a particular course, each course containing at least one hole, each hole containing a tee, a fairway, a green, a pin and a cup;
g. a list of available golf bags, capable of being engaged for selecting a particular golf bag, each bag containing a plurality of topics, each topic containing a plurality of questions ranging in difficulty from least to most difficulty;
h. a toggle switch capable of advancing the game past the preliminary screen.
16) The game of claim 15, wherein the preliminary screen further comprising:
a. a toggle switch capable of displaying tips for playing the game;
b. a toggle switch, capable of displaying rules for playing the game;
c. a toggle switch, capable of loading a previously saved game.
17) The game of claim 16, wherein the preliminary screen further comprising a toggle switch, capable of entering into a chat room.
18) The game of claim 17, the game having a hole preview screen, the screen having:
a. a scorecard;
b. a list of golf clubs, and a list of minimum yards each golf club sends a ball upon the program receiving a correct answer to a question, wherein:
i. each club having a swingweight that differs from each other club, where a club having a greater swingweight is capable of driving a ball farther toward the pin than a club having a smaller swingweight;
c. an elevated perspective preview of the next hole, the preview having a tee, a fairway, a green, a pin, and a cup;
d. a toggle switch providing:
i. a check box capable of activating or deactivating background sound;
ii. a check box capable of activating or deactivating the showing of a correct answer;
iii. a check box capable of activating or deactivating program comments;
iv. a check box capable of activating or deactivating an automatic selection of a club;
v. a toggle switch capable of displaying tips for playing the game; and
vi. a toggle switch, capable of displaying rules for playing the game;
19) The game of claim 18, where the hole preview screen having a toggle switch capable of initiating the play screen, the play screen having:
a. a display area for displaying a selected topic or a selected question;
b. a second area of the hole, the second area being the location of the ball;
c. a third area, adjacent to the second area, wherein a timer is located, wherein if the ball is not on the green:
i. the timer capable of limiting the time for selecting a club to a first predetermined time period, wherein:
1. the program being capable of allowing the selection of a club if the selection is made in a time being less than the first time period;
a. wherein the program asks a difficult question, the question having a difficulty that is probabilistically related to the selection of a club having a greater swingweight;
ii. the timer being capable of limiting the time to answer a question to a second predefined period, wherein:
1. upon receiving the correct answer to the question, the program being capable of driving the ball, in real time, additional yards towards the pin in a time being less than the second predefined period;
2. upon receiving the incorrect answer to the question, the program being capable of driving the ball, in real time, towards a trouble spot comprising sand, water, behind an object, out of bounds, or ricochet back onto the fairway
d. on said third area, wherein if the ball is on the green:
i. the timer capable of limiting the time for answering the question a predetermined time period, and the program selecting a club and wherein the program asks a question having a difficulty that is proportional to the distance from the pin; and
1. upon receiving the correct answer to the question, the program being capable of driving the ball, in real time, into the cup;
2. upon receiving the incorrect answer to the question, the program being capable of driving the ball, in real time, half way towards the pin;
e. a golfer is located in the second area of the hole, wherein:
i. the golfer capable of the holding a club;
ii. the golfer capable of swinging the club;
f. an aerial perspective image of the entire hole, the image of the entire hole having an indicator for indicating the location of the golfer;
g. a yardage indicator capable of indicating the total yardage from the ball to the pin.
Description
    FIELD
  • [0001]
    The invention relates to games and in particular to trivia games played on a computer or game console.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    Golf is an extremely popular outdoor game, and there have been many efforts to mimic the popularity in an indoor environment as well as in board and trivia games. Such games have been unable to capture the excitement of outdoor golf.
  • [0003]
    One example of a prior art golf game is U.S. Pat. No. 5,692,751 to Morrissey, et al. Morrissey teaches a board game having a plurality of holes in a golf course. Morrissey has a plurality of cards representing golf clubs. Each card has a question, where each question falls into one of a plurality of categories.
  • [0004]
    In Morrissey, each player rolls a die, the result of which determines the category and the question. The player reads the question and guesses the answer. The player then chooses a club that the player wants to use for the shot, and selects the card that corresponds to the club. The card has the correct answer and instructions on how to move if the player guessed the right answer or the wrong answer. Time is not a function in Morrissey.
  • [0005]
    In comparison with Morrissey, the present invention allows the user to determine the difficulty of the question by picking the club prior to receiving the question. Further, the yardage that the ball traverses in the present invention is augmented when the player answers the question in a timely manner. Moreover, the players in the present invention, as compared with Morrissey, are penalized by not quickly choosing a club or answering the question.
  • [0006]
    An example of a prior art trivia game is U.S. Pat. No 1,635,734 to Ziegler. In Ziegler, one player in a group reads a question and each player guesses at an answer. The first player then reads the answer. The player who guessed correctly is allowed to advance on a playing board by a number indicated on the card. The first player to reach 100 wins. There is no time limit in Ziegler. In comparison to Ziegler, the present invention divides the questions from least to most difficult and rewards the user for answering the most difficult questions in the least amount of time.
  • [0007]
    Another example of a prior art golf board game is U.S. Pat. No. 3,608,901 to Royle. In Royle, the player is neither concerned with time nor answering trivia questions.
  • [0008]
    In U.S. Pat. No. 4,854,594 to Eaton, a board game is disclosed that requires the user to answer trivia questions to advance on a 7×7 matrix. In Royle, the player has control to a great extent as to the topic or category of the question, and the path that the pieces follow is under the control of the players. In comparison, the present invention randomly chooses the topic and when the player incorrectly answers the question, the trajectory of the ball is out of control of the player.
  • [0009]
    In U.S. Pat. No. 4,856,780 to Begley, et al., a basketball trivia board game is disclosed. The player advances on the board by answering questions correctly. The questions are chosen by rolling dice, where the roll determines the difficulty of the question. The points gained are greater when the player answers more difficult questions.
  • [0010]
    In contrast with the present invention, Begley does not allow the user to control the difficulty of the question, thereby allowing the user to reach the goal more quickly. Further as compared to the present invention, Begley does not reward or penalize the user for answering the question quickly or slowly, thus enhancing the pace of the play.
  • [0011]
    In U.S. Pat. No. 5,123,653 to Murphy et al, a basketball trivia game is disclosed. Murphy teaches a board game where the player advances by answering trivia questions from different categories, where the categories relate to different elements of basketball. For example, one topic is CD which stands for the Central Division. In contrast with the present invention, Murphy does not allow the player to control the level of difficulty of the question, and Murphy does not reward the player for answering the question in a timely manner.
  • [0012]
    In U.S. Pat. No. 7,746,431 to McIntyre et al., a football trivia board game is disclosed. McIntyre teaches a board game having different categories of questions. Within a category, the player controls the level of difficulty of the questions for advancing the ball further down the playing field. The category of the question is predetermined and the player has 30 seconds to answer the question. As compare to the present invention, McIntyre fails to select the category randomly and fails to teach or disclose that yards are gained or lost if the player answers the question diligently or slowly.
  • [0013]
    In U.S. Pat. No. 5,308,077, to Caggiano, a board game is disclosed. Caggiano teaches a board game consisting of differing squares, where each square is a differing category. Dice are rolled and the outcome determines which category is used. A card is selected from the resulting category, where the card has a question that will be posed to the player. The player is given a particular time limit to answer the question. As compared to the present invention, Caggiano fails to illustrate that the player can control the difficulty of the question, where the more difficult questions can provide the player with greater points. Caggiano also fails to teach that the points can be increased if the player answers the question more quickly.
  • [0014]
    In U.S. Pat. No. 5,501,456 to Collins, et al., and in U.S. Pat. No. 5,901,956 to Warmack, a sports trivia board game, in a football environment is disclosed. Both Collins and Warmack teach a game having question cards, where the players answer the most questions correctly to achieve the high score. As compared to the present invention, both Collins and Warmack fail to teach different categories of questions or a timer, where points can be increased if the player answers the questions more quickly. Both also fail to teach that the difficulty of the questions is controllable for more quickly advancing the player on the playing filed.
  • [0015]
    In U.S. Pat. No. 5,645,279 to Reutlinger, a trivia board game is disclosed, where the theme of the game is the history of automotive vehicles. To advance on the board, a user must answer questions. Reutlinger teaches that players are not penalized for incorrectly answering a question. In comparison to the present invention, Reutlinger fails to teach that the visual environment of the game illustrates the theme of the game. Further, Reutlinger fails to disclose that the user plays against a timer, where the player benefits from answering the question more quickly, and the player is penalized by incorrectly answering the question or failing to answer the question. Reutlinger also fails to teach that the player can control the difficulty of the question to more quickly advance on the playing board.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0016]
    A trivia game is provided, capable of being executed on a computer or game console. The game has a plurality of trivia topics and a plurality of questions within each topic, the questions ranging in the level of difficulty from relatively easy to relatively difficult. The game performs the steps of randomly selecting one trivia topic from the plurality of topics, asking a question based on a predetermined level of difficulty within the topic, timing the response to the question, receiving a response to the question, and providing a precise advancement calculated from both the speed and the accuracy of the response.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • [0017]
    In order that the manner in which the above recited objectives are realized, a particular description of the invention will be rendered by reference to specific embodiments thereof that are illustrated in the appended drawings. Understanding that the drawings depict only typical embodiments of the invention and are not therefore to be considered to be limiting of its scope, the invention will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings in which:
  • [0018]
    FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of the preferred embodiment of the invention; and
  • [0019]
    FIGS. 2-7 are a continuation of the schematic diagram of FIG. 1.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS
  • [0020]
    The computerized trivia program has a plurality of topics. Each topic has a plurality of questions, where the question range from easiest to hardest. The topic is randomly selected by the program and the difficulty of the questions are controllable by the user. The program has a timer that the user must work against when answering questions. The user has various methods of advancing rapidly through a game course. The program accounts for the user's speed as well as the accuracy of the user's answer. Accordingly, a user can advance rapidly by successively answering easier questions at a fast pace, or answering the hardest questions at a slightly slower pace. A user is penalized by answering questions too slowly or by answering only easy questions.
  • [0021]
    The trivia game is usable in many environments. One category of environments is a sporting environment, and one type of sporting environment is a golfing environment. In the golfing environment, the user who has the least number of swings wins the game.
  • [0022]
    In the golf program, the program selects the question topic, the user chooses the difficulty of the question, and the program runs the timer. The user increases the difficulty of the question by choosing to hit the ball with the club having the greater swingweight for driving the ball further.
  • [0023]
    As an example, the user receives a more difficult question by selecting a long iron (2, 3 and 4 irons), and the user receives a less difficult question by selecting a short iron (8 or 9 iron, or the pitching iron). The reason the questions become more difficult when the user selects the clubs with the greater swingweight is that these clubs send the ball further towards the pin, and the user can answer less questions to get the ball into the cup. The program also rewards a quick answer by sending the ball even further towards the pin, where the extra distance is proportional to the speed that the question is answered.
  • [0024]
    The terrain on the hole simulates a real life environment, with elevated and offset perspectives, and panoramic views of the playing hole that provide a virtual three dimensional hole. The program also provides real time motion of the player and the ball. For example, when a player swings, the motion of the club and the player's body imitates real time motion of a person swinging a club. Further, when the club connects with the ball, the ball sails through space with a real time reaction to the swing. The player then responds according to the ending trajectory of the ball. For example, the player visually becomes dismayed, with real time behavior, if the ball lands in the rough. The program penalizes the less skilled user by diverting the ball towards real life trouble spots, such as deep rough, sand, water, and obstructing objects.
  • [0025]
    The program provides a preliminary screen 1 and 2, illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, where the preliminary screen has a location for the user to enter an identifier. The user can also control basic options, such as loading a saved game (step 4), and displaying tips and rules for the game (steps 9 and 11). The program provides a screen for previewing the hole that is to be played 2, illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. The preview screen also allows the user to review tips and rules for playing the game (steps 9 and 11), as well as previewing the terrain of the hole (step 9), reviewing the scorecard to determine par for the holes on the course (step 31).
  • [0026]
    In addition to the preliminary screen 1 and the preview screen 2, the program provides a playing screen 3, illustrated in FIGS. 4-7. The playing screen displays the different clubs that the user can choose from to control the difficulty of the questions (step 34, FIG. 4). The play screen also displays updated scorecard so the user can determine how well his or her performance is relative to par (step 39).
  • [0027]
    The play screen 3 displays the randomly selected topic (step 41), highlights the club chosen by the user (step 46, FIG. 5) and displays the question that is displayed in response to the user selecting a particular club (step 48). The play screen also displays the timer (steps 51 and 52).
  • [0028]
    The player has several methods that quickly advance the player to the pin because the program accounts for both the speed and accuracy of the user's shot. The user can quickly advance to the pin by rapidly answering a succession of easier questions, or by successfully answering the more difficult questions at a slightly lower pace. For a user that correctly answers any question in less than five seconds, and, on the same shot, the user reaches the green, then the user has a one percent chance of holing out. For example, if the user were on the tee, then the user would receive a one additional point to their score and receive a hole-in-one. (step 69, FIG. 6). If the user were on the fairway, then it would be one stroke added to the score and the player would put into the hole. For the user that is incorrect or fails to answer the question, the play screen 3 will display the ball in a real world trouble spot, such as in the sand, on the rough, behind an object, out of bounds, or in a pond of water (step 64, FIG. 7).
  • [0029]
    Turning now to FIG. 1, the program is initiated (step 1) by a player clicking on an icon in an environment such as Windows XP, by Microsoft Corp. The icon activates the program's executable file (“.exe” file), where the file is be stored on a local hard drive, a removable drive, or on another computer located on a local or wide area network.
  • [0030]
    After initialization of the program, the program provides a preliminary screen that has a blank space which requests identification from the user (step 2). The identification can be in the form of a sir name, a first name, or a pseudonym.
  • [0031]
    The preliminary screen has a toggle switch below that, when engaged by the user, allows the user to enter an online community room (step 3). The toggle switch is below the space allotted for inserting the identification of the user. In the online community, the user can discuss the game with other players, engage in single or multiple player games, and have their statistics stored and displayed throughout the community. For example, users can discuss strategies, results, opinions, etc, in a multi-user environment.
  • [0032]
    The preliminary screen also has a toggle switch that, when engaged by the user, allows the user to start a new game or to play a game stored on the user's data storage device (step 4). The toggle switch is located adjacent to the toggle switch for entering the chat room. The data storage device can be the hard drive of the user's computer, or a removable drive or a location on an accessible network. Opening a stored game is a useful option for several reasons. The user might be interested in completing a stored game to achieving a personal best score. On the other hand, the user might only have time to play the last three holes in an incomplete game. Such a user would open a stored game rather than playing a new game.
  • [0033]
    If the user selects to play a new game, the program allows the user to play the pre-installed course, being the default course, or to play an additional course (step 5). The courses are provided in a list, located adjacent to the field for entering the user's identity, where the list is capable of being scrolled through by the user for selecting the course of interest.
  • [0034]
    If the user chooses the pre-installed course, the program loads a course having 18 holes on various types of terrain (step 6). The pre-installed course is stored on the user's media or on an accessible network. The additional course would also have 18 holes and might represent a famous course or include featured holes known in the golf community, such as the famous Black Diamond in Beth Page, N.Y. The additional course would be stored on the user's media, or on an accessible network, or be downloadable from the website of the software provider.
  • [0035]
    If the user selects to play a new game, the program allows the user to select the pre-installed golf bag or select an additional golf bag (step 7). The golf bags are provided in a list that is located adjacent to the list for selecting golf courses. The list for golf bags is capable of being scrolled through by the user so that the user can select a bag of interest.
  • [0036]
    If the user selects the pre-installed golf bag, the program loads the bag from the user's media or on an accessible network (step 8). If the user selects the additional bag, the bag may be loaded from the user's media or an accessible network or might be downloadable from the website of the software provider.
  • [0037]
    The pre-installed golf bag contains four topic groups, where each topic group has six hundred questions, and each set of question is divided into five levels of difficulty. The topics are sports, general IQ, entertainment, and potluck, where pot luck has questions that could be categorized into each of the other groups. The six hundred questions on a given topic, in the pre-installed golf bag, are categorized from easiest to most difficult. In contrast, the additional bag might have advanced questions on one topic only, such as entertainment. Such a golf bag might focus on a particular genre, such as movies from the 1950's.
  • [0038]
    Turning now to FIG. 2, there is displayed step 9 through step 22. These steps consist of options capable of being engaged by the user. The options are accessed from the preliminary screen, in conjunction with step 8, on FIG. 1, or on a hole preview screen, in conjunction with step 28, on FIG. 3. The hole preview screen is capable of being engaged by the user prior to the user playing each hole.
  • [0039]
    When step 9 is accessed from the preliminary screen, then the options are incorporated onto the preliminary screen. When step 9 is accessed from the hole preview screen, the options are grouped into a toggle switch titled “options.” The toggle switch is capable of being engaged by the user, and the toggle switch activates a “pop-up” window that provides the options to the user.
  • [0040]
    Turning back to FIG. 2, the program has a toggle switch that, when engaged by the user, allows the user to review playing tips (step 9). When the user request to see the tips, the program displays the tips (step 10). The tips include, for example, strategies for playing the game. The user then, at the user's convenience, exits the tips screen.
  • [0041]
    The program has a toggle switch that, when engaged by the user, allows the user to view rules for playing the game (step 11). The toggle switch for reviewing the rules is below the toggle switch for reviewing the tips. When the user requests to view the rules, the program displays the rules (step 12). The rules include, for example, the layout for the graphical user interface, and general score keeping rules of golf and the program. The user then, at the user's convenience, exits the rules screen.
  • [0042]
    The program provides a check box that, when engaged by a user, allows the user to activate or deactivate background sounds (step 13). The check box is located adjacent to the toggle switch for reviewing the tips. The background sounds consist of comments by a caddie as to the effectiveness of a player's shots, nature sounds, and cheers and jeers by a spectator crowd. A player would instruct the program to deactivate this option if the player's computer was without speakers or a soundcard, or noise was a concern because the user was playing at night. In response to the user's direction, the program activates or deactivates the background sound (step 14).
  • [0043]
    The program displays a check box that, when engaged by a user, allows the user to activate or deactivate showing the correct answer (step 15). The check box is located below the check box for controlling the caddie sound. Activating this option causes the program to highlight the correct answer upon the incorrect selection by the user. Highlighting the correct answer allows the user to learn the correct answer while the user plays the game. Alternatively, a user might wish to deactivate this option so that the user can “look up” the solution to incorrect answers, or discuss incorrect answers with others and come to an consensus. In response to the user's decision, the program activates or deactivates answer highlighting (step 16).
  • [0044]
    The program includes an interactive check box that allows the user to activate or deactivate caddie comments (step 17). The check box is located below the check box for showing the correct answer. Activating this option causes the program to make comments when shots are properly or improperly executed, whereas the comments are related to the strategy of the shot. For example, when a user incorrectly answers a question, and lands in the deep rough, the caddie might comment “that was a tough break.” A user might wish to deactivate the caddie comments. In response to the user's decision, the program activates or deactivates answer caddie comments (step 18).
  • [0045]
    The program provides a selectable check box that allows the user to have the electronic caddie select the club for each shot (step 19). The check box is located below the check box for controlling the caddie sound. If the user is behind an object, the caddie will select a sand wedge. If the user is on the tee, on the fairway, in the sand, or in the rough, the caddie will pick a club that sends the ball as close as possible to the pin, without overshooting the pin.
  • [0046]
    A beginning user, while becoming accustomed to the game, might want the caddie to make the club selection. However, a seasoned player might wish to have the autonomy of choosing his or her own club. In response to the user's decision, the program activates or deactivates the caddie's automatic club selection (step 20).
  • [0047]
    The program displays a toggle switch that, when engaged by a user, allows the user to exit the program (step 21). The toggle switch is located on the lower left corner of the screen. When this toggle switch is engaged on the preliminary screen, the program simply terminates. When this toggle switch is engaged on the “pop-up” options screen, a second “pop-up” screen appears having two further toggle switches.
  • [0048]
    Regarding the second “pop-up” screen, the first of the two toggle switches is titled “exit” and the second of the toggle switches is titled “save game.”
  • [0049]
    Both first and second “pop-up” screens appear on the hole preview screen, so that the switch is probably engaged after the user has completed at least one hole.
  • [0050]
    Accordingly, the “save game” option is particularly useful for a user that has a time limitation. If the user does not have time to advance to a new hole, and is scoring at or under par for a course, the user might wish to toggle the switch to save the game and then toggle the switch to exit the program. Otherwise, if the user is scoring poorly, or has just finished initiating the game (a minor process) then the user might wish to toggle the switch to exit the game without saving. Upon the user toggling the switch to exit the game, the program proceeds to exit (step 22).
  • [0051]
    The second “pop-up” screen disappears if it remains unused. The program has a toggle switch on the first “pop-up” window that is capable of being engaged by the user to exit the first “pop-up” window and returning to the hole preview screen.
  • [0052]
    The program shows a toggle switch on the preliminary window that, when engaged by the user, allows the user to continue to the next hole. The toggle switch is located on the lower right corner of the screen. If the user has the time to complete at least one hole on the new course or advance one hole on a previously saved course, then the user would toggle the switch to continue to the tee on the next hole.
  • [0053]
    Turning now to FIG. 3, once the user has continued past step 21, the program initiates the hole preview screen (step 23). After the screen is initiated, the program continues to identify the “next” hole (step 24). The default “next” hole is the first hole, which is appropriate when a new game has started.
  • [0054]
    As indicated, the hole preview screen is viewed by the user prior to playing each hole. The program will reach step 24 eighteen times during an eighteen hole course, and for seventeen of those occurrences, the “next” hole will be a hole other than the first hole. As shown in FIG. 3, the program can reach step 24 after step 23 or step 38, which is after the player has completed another hole.
  • [0055]
    The program determines, at step 25, whether the player has played the 18th hole. If the player has played all 18 holes in a course, the program terminates the game (step 26). Terminating the game after 18 holes is appropriate because the program, which simulates a standard golf course, has a maximum of 18 holes.
  • [0056]
    When the program determines that the player has played less than 18 holes, the program displays, on the right side of the screen, each club and the minimum distance the club sends the ball towards the green (step 27). These relationships are valid when the player is on the tee, on the fairway, in the rough or in the sand. For example, a “1 wood” sends a ball 250 yards towards the green, a “3 wood” sends the ball 235 yards, a “5 wood” sends the ball 220 yards, a “3 iron” sends the ball 205 yards, a “4 iron” sends the ball 190 yards, a “5 iron” sends the ball 175 yards, a “6 iron” sends the ball 160 yards, a “7 iron” sends the ball 145 yards, an “8 iron” sends the ball 130 yards, a “9 iron” sends the ball 115 yards, a “pitching wedge” sends the ball 100 yards, and a “sand wedge” sends the ball 85 yards.
  • [0057]
    The maximum distance that each club can send a ball is the minimum distance plus 30 yards. Whether the user is able to send the ball any or all of the extra 30 yards depends on how quickly the user answers the question, as later illustrated by steps 52 through 58, and FIGS. 5 and 6.
  • [0058]
    Upon reaching step 28, the program allows the user to repeat review the “options” screen, steps 9 to 22, shown in FIG. 2. This is handy because the user may wishes to review, before starting each hole, the tips (step 9) or rules (step 11) of the game, or store the game and restart at a later time (step 21). This option is also useful if the user wants, prior to a particular hole, to turn off or on the background sound (step 13), the answer highlighting (step 15), the caddie comments (step 17), or the automatic selection of the club by the caddie (step 19).
  • [0059]
    Turning back to FIG. 3, the user has the option to toggle between previewing the next hole or looking at the scorecard (step 29). This toggle switch is located in the center of the screen, adjacent to the “options” toggle. When viewing the next hole, the user can preview the terrain and yardage, from an elevated perspective of the terrain, and prepare an appropriate strategy. The user can toggle to view the scorecard in order to preview the par for each remaining hole. If the user has already completed at least one hole, the user can also view the scorecard to see how well he or she has performed. The program toggles to the scorecard upon the user's request (steps 30, 31). Moreover, the program will toggle back to previewing the next hole, in an elevated perspective, upon the user's request.
  • [0060]
    The user has the option to continue reviewing the options provided by steps 28 through 32, or engage a toggle switch titled “continuing to the tee” (step 32). During this time, the user can continue to review the scorecard or preview the next hole(step 30) or, for example, save the game and exit (steps 21, and 22). When the user is satisfied with his or her decisions, the user engages the switch to continue to the tee on the next hole.
  • [0061]
    Turning now to FIG. 4, the user has chosen to play the next hole, in step 32, and the program now initiates the play screen and determines the location of the player on the field (step 33). The default location of the player on the field will be the “tee.” The program also displays the list of clubs and the minimum distance for each club, as displayed in the hole preview screen (step 34).
  • [0062]
    The tee is appropriate when the player is first driving on a hole. However, there are occasions where the player would be on other locations, besides the tee. Specifically, step 33 can also be initiated from any of steps 59, 60, 64, or 68. when the player would have taken at least one swing. Following the swing, the user could have advanced past the tee to other locations on the fairway, or into trouble spots, or on the green. However, the subsequent swings could have landed out of bounds, in which case the swing would still be on the tee.
  • [0063]
    Upon determining the location of the player, the program, at step 35, displays the elevated perspective of the hole, and, in real time, moves towards the location of the player. The player and the location are then displayed in the center of the screen, in an offset perspective. Through the offset perspective, the program provides a clear view of the player, the ball, and a panoramic view of the hole from the player's perspective. This panoramic view presents an effective three dimensional hole.
  • [0064]
    As an example of the dynamic panning by the program, if the current location is in the sand, then the display pans from the elevated perspective view of the hole to a close-up of the location of the player on the sand, with the player in the middle of the screen. As another example, if the current location is the green, then the display pans from the elevated view of the hole to a close-up of the location of the player on the green, with the player in the center of the screen.
  • [0065]
    The play screen also displays, on the left side of the screen, the entire current hole, including the tee, fairway, trouble spots, green, and pin (step 35). This display allows the user to monitor themselves while playing. The program highlights the location of the user on the hole to assist the user in determining his or her location, which helps the user in preparing or adjusting a strategy for the hole.
  • [0066]
    The play screen displays the comparison between the clubs and the minimum distance for each club. This allows the user to continuously update his or her strategy for playing the hole. For example, if the hole has 350 yards, with a par of 3, the player might choose a 6 iron, which would place the user less than 200 yards from the pin if answered correctly. The user could select a 4 iron on the second shot and land safely within the green. Alternatively, if the par is 4, the user could adjust the strategy by choosing irons having a smaller swingweight, such as 8 irons, and taking a series of shorter drives. Three swings with an 8 iron, when answering the questions correctly, would still land the user safely within the green for the fourth swing.
  • [0067]
    The program determines if the player has scored on this hole, and if the player has played any swings, both anywhere on the hole and on the green (step 36). If the player proceeded from the hole preview screen to the play screen (to step 33 from step 32), then the player would be newly starting any one of the holes decided by step 24. However, if the player proceeded to step 33 from any of steps 59, 60, 64 or 68, then the player would have taken at least one swing on the current hole, could also have taken one or more strokes on the green.
  • [0068]
    After determining the player's score on the current hole, the program determines if the user has played 10 total strokes on the hole, including a maximum of 5 strokes on the green (step 37). If the player has achieved either one of these strokes, then the program advances the player to the next hole (step 38). The purpose of steps 37 and 38 is to simulate real golf by preventing the user from playing more than 10 total strokes on any hole, including 5 maximum strokes on the green.
  • [0069]
    In advancing the player to the next hole, the program returns to the hole preview screen, step 24, shown in FIG. 3. At this point, the program identifies the “next” hole as the hole that follows the immediately preceding hole. For example, if the immediately preceding hole was the first hole, the “next” hole is the second hole. The program determines again if the user has passed the 18th hole (step 25). If the user has passed the 18th hole, the user's game is terminated (step 26).
  • [0070]
    Returning to FIG. 4, if, at step 37, the user has not reached 10 total strokes on the hole, including a maximum of 5 strokes on the green, the program displays the user's updated scorecard on the lower left corner of the play screen (step 39). The user's current score, relative to par, helps the user prepare a strategy for the next swing.
  • [0071]
    The program randomly chooses a topic from one of the four topics, being sports, general IQ, entertainment, and potluck (step 40). The program identifies the selected topic in the center of the screen, below the player. It illustrates the randomness of the selection, the program spins a fortune style casino wheel having each of the topics listed on the wheel. When the wheel stops spinning, the topic is selected.
  • [0072]
    Randomly choosing the topic serves several purposes. Firstly, the user cannot advance too quickly by only choosing a topic that fails to challenge him or her. Secondly, it prolongs the life of the game by exposing the user to all 2400 questions rather than 600 questions on a given topic. Further, it adds a level of unpredictability and thus excitement to the game.
  • [0073]
    Once the topic is chosen, the caddie recommends a club (step 41). The program communicates the recommendation to the user by accenting the particular club in the series of clubs, displayed on the right side of the play screen. The accent is in the form of an asterisk. However, the accent can also be in the form of highlighting the club.
  • [0074]
    The caddie is programmed to get the ball to the pin as quickly as possible. Accordingly, if the user is not behind an obstacle or on the green, the program chooses a club based upon the location of the ball to the pin. For example, if the user is first teeing, the caddie would recommend the 1 wood, providing that the pin was at least 250 yards from the tee. If the user is behind an object, the program selects a sand wedge. The sand wedge is the only club that allows the user to navigate out of the troubled area. If the user is on the green, the program chooses the putter.
  • [0075]
    When on the green, or behind a object, only the caddie has the power to select the club that the player will use. The player would also not have the power to select a different club if, in the preliminary screen or on the options screen, at step 19, shown on FIG. 2, the user elected to have the caddie choose the club. If the user made this election, then the user would not have the opportunity to alter that choice until the player is next on the hole preview screen, after the current hole is complete. If the player elected to have the caddie choose the club, the program provides the user with the caddie selected club (step 47).
  • [0076]
    If the automatic selecting of the club is not activated, and the user is not on the green or behind an object, then the program provides the user with the option to select a club (step 43). The program gives the user fifteen seconds to select a club (step 44). The timer is located on the left of the screen, above the scorecard. This time limit helps maintain the momentum of the game.
  • [0077]
    Following step 44, the player must choose a club. The player chooses a club by playing his or her pointing device, or mouse, on the appropriate club and selecting or “double-clicking” the club. While the user is moving the pointer over the list of clubs, the program highlights the club which would be chosen if the user “double-clicked” the user's mouse.
  • [0078]
    On the fairway, the difficulty of the questions is proportional to the club chosen so that there are thirteen levels of difficulty. For each club, there is a particular chance that a question will be chosen from one of the five levels of question difficulty. For example, a driver would have an eighty percent chance of being matched with a question from the fifth level, or most difficult level of questions, a nine percent chance of being matched to a forth level of questions, a six percent chance of being matched to a third level of questions, a three percent chance of being matched to a second level of questions, and a two percent chance of being matched to a first, or easiest level of questions.
  • [0079]
    On the other hand of the difficulty scale, a sand wedge would have an eighty percent chance of being matched with a question from the first level, or easiest level of questions, a nine percent chance of being matched to a second level of questions, a six percent chance of being matched to a third level of questions, a three percent chance of being matched to a fourth level of questions, and a two percent chance of being matched to a fifth, or most difficult level of questions. The eleven clubs in-between the sand wedge and driver have predetermined ratios that provide an differentiating level of difficulty between the clubs. It is to be appreciated that these percentages are for example only, and that other percentages can be used without altering the nature and scope of the invention.
  • [0080]
    Accordingly, if a user chooses a club with a greater swingweight, such as a 1 wood, the program would probably ask the user a very difficult question. In contrast, if a user chooses a club with a lesser swingweight, such as a 9 iron, the program would probably ask the user a relatively easy question. However, the probability also exists that the program will ask the user an easy question even if the user selects a driver, and the program might ask the user a more difficult question even when the user selects a sand wedge.
  • [0081]
    The random degree of difficulty, when choosing a club, simulates real golf in that actual degrees of difficulty are often independent of the club but rather depend upon the ball position relative to the hole. For example, a player could be ten yards from the green and be faced with a tricky wedge shot where, for example, the green slopes away from the player. Accordingly, the game simulates the randomness of real world golf by providing the player with a difficult question, at random times, even when the player chooses a wedge club. Furthermore, the playing conditions might be favorable even with a long shot. Accordingly, the game randomly provides the player with an easy question even when the player chooses a more difficult club, such as a driver.
  • [0082]
    While the player is choosing the club, the program is keeping track of the elapsing 15 seconds (step 45). If the player does not choose a club within the allotted time, then the program uses club chosen by the caddy (step 47). If however, the player chooses a club within the allotted time, then the program allows the player to use the club chosen by him or her (step 46). As indicated, the timer keeps the momentum of the game from slowing down due to a player's indecision.
  • [0083]
    When the club is chosen, either by the user or by the program, the selected club remains highlighted on the screen. Alongside of the selected club are the remaining club options, where the remaining clubs appear muted compared to the selected club. The difference in appearance helps to indicate to the user which club the user is going to play. Accordingly, the club clearly indicates the difficulty of the question that is about to be presented.
  • [0084]
    After the player has a club, the program chooses a question within the subtopic (step 48). The program displays the question by removing the topic indicator and replacing in the same location the randomly chosen question. Below the question are four choices, where one of the choices is correct while the remainder are incorrect. The user answers the question by moving the user's mouse over one of the choices and “double-clicking” or selecting the choice. The program highlights the choice that would be selected if the user were to “double-click” so that the user is assured of selecting the desired answer.
  • [0085]
    Turning to FIG. 5, the program next allocates time for the swing. The timer is displayed on the left side of the playing screen, above the scorecard and below the layout of the hole. In determining the amount of allocated time, the program again checks the location of the ball. The program determines if the player is on the green (step 48). If the player is not on the green, the program determines if the player is in the rough or the sand (step 50).
  • [0086]
    If the program determines that the user is not on the green or in the rough or in the sand, the program gives the user 15 seconds to answer the question (step 52). On the other hand, if the user is not on the green, but is in the rough or in the sand, the program gives the user 7 seconds to answer the question (step 51). At this point, the program awaits the user's answer.
  • [0087]
    The purpose of the time difference is to reward a player for correctly answering each question as quickly as possible and penalize a player for incorrectly answering a question or not answering a question. As disclosed in step 64, below, a player can only be in the rough or sand if the immediately preceding question, on the same hole, was answered incorrectly or not answered at all. For each second remaining on the clock after a question is correctly answered, the program augments the position of the ball by two yards per remaining second.
  • [0088]
    To illustrate the effect that the timer has on augmenting the ball position, if the user selects a 6 iron (min distance of 160 yards) and answers the question correctly with 13 seconds remaining on the clock (i.e., in 2 seconds), the program moves the player's ball, with a real time visual accompaniment, 186 yards towards the green. Accordingly, the user has less of an opportunity to capitalize on the bonus yards if the player has incorrectly answered a question or not answered a question, and the player has landed in the sand or rough.
  • [0089]
    If the program determines that the player is currently on the green (step 49) then the program determines if the immediately prior swing was initiated on the green or was initiated off of the green and concluded on the green (step 53). If the prior swing was initiated off the green, then the timer is started at 20 seconds (step 54). If the prior swing was initiated on the green, then the timer is not started at 20 seconds, but rather continues from the time that remained at the conclusion of the prior swing.
  • [0090]
    Allowing the clock to continue running while the player is on the green may appear to be a detriment to the player. However even answering a question incorrectly on the green advances the user's ball halfway towards the pin, as illustrated in step 68, FIG. 7, below. The ball is moved toward the pin because in a real situation, it would be reasonable to assume that a player would advance the ball by some measurable distance towards the pin, even if the player does not sink the ball within the cup.
  • [0091]
    The benefit of moving the ball closer to the pin, when the player misses on the green, is yet further offset by the imposed limit of 5 strokes on the green and 10 total swings, as disclosed in step 37, FIG. 4, above. Thus, the continued countdown of the clock builds the momentum of the game by requiring the user to respond quickly and accurately at the most crucial position on the hole.
  • [0092]
    After the timer has begun to countdown, the program determines whether the user has failed to select the correct answer to the question, or failed to answer the question in the time allocated (step 55). If the user failed on to answer the question correctly or failed to answer the question in the allotted time, the program determines if the user deactivated the display of the correct answer on the preliminary screen or on the options screen, in step 16, or the caddie comments, in step 17.
  • [0093]
    If the user deactivated the showing of the correct answer, at step 16, or the announcing of caddie comments, at step 17, then the program refrains from displaying that deactivated option. The next opportunity the user will have to reactivate either of these options is upon viewing the hole preview screen, after the completion of the current hole and prior to starting the next hole. If, on the other hand, the user activated either of the showing of the correct answer or the announcing of the caddie comments, then the correct answer is highlighted or the caddie comments about the missed swing, respectively.
  • [0094]
    After highlighting the correct answer or making caddie comments, the program determines if the user was on the green, the fairway or the tee (step 62). If the user was on the fairway or tee, the program adds one point to the user's total swings (step 63). This point is reflected in the total swings for the hole on the displayed scorecard. The program also penalizes the user by sending the ball to one of the five troubled areas, consisting of sand, the water, behind an object, out of bounds, or ricochet back onto the fairway (step 64).
  • [0095]
    Each hole is designed so that four of the six troubled areas are always within reach of the player, regardless of the club being used. Accordingly, even if the player selects the sand wedge, the player will be within swinging distance to the sand, water, a blocking object, out of bounds, or an object that would cause the ball to ricochet back onto the fairway. This subjects the user to constant challenges of a real golf course.
  • [0096]
    If the ball lands in the sand or the rough, the user must play the ball where it has landed. If the ball lands in water, the ball is placed where it first crossed into the water. If the ball lands out-of-bounds, the ball is brought back to its original distance. However, the ball might also bounce off of an object, back to the fairway, so that the player is effectively not penalized. After the ball has landed, the program goes to step 33, FIG. 4, where the program determines if the player has had 10 total swings (step 37). If the player has not reached that limit, the player continues to play the hole.
  • [0097]
    Returning to FIG. 7, if the user was on the green and missed a swing, the program determines if the user ran out of available time (step 65). If the user ran out of available time, the program adds 5 additional strokes to the player's score and advances the player to the next hole (step 66). The program then returns the player to hole preview screen, step 24, shown in FIG. 3, and determines if the player has played all 18 holes. If the player has not played all 18 holes (step 25), then the program allows the user to play the next hole.
  • [0098]
    Returning to FIG. 7, if the user was on the green and missed a swing, and has run out of time, the program adds “1” to the number of swings recorded on the green. The program displays this increase in score on the scorecard located on the lower left corner of the screen. The program moves the ball half way between the pin and the current position (step 68).
  • [0099]
    Upon moving the ball, the program goes to step 33, FIG. 4, where the program determines if the player has had 10 total strokes on the hole, including 5 maximum strokes on the green (step 37). If the player has not reached either of these limits, the player continues to play the hole.
  • [0100]
    Returning to FIG. 5, if the program determines that the player answered the question correctly in the time allotted (step 55), the program proceeds to determine if the player was on the green (step 56). If the player was on the green, the program sinks the ball in the cup, adds “1” to the score of the player, and advances the player to the next hole (step 57). Visually, the program increases the number of recorded swings on the current hole by “1” and displays the result on the scorecard on the lower left corner of the play screen. Then the program returns the player to the hole preview screen, at step 24, on FIG. 3, and determines if the player has played all 18 holes (step 25). If the player has not played all 18 holes, then the program allows the player to play the next hole.
  • [0101]
    Returning again to FIG. 5, if the program determines that the player correctly answered the question, but was on the tee or fairway (step 56) the program adds “1” to the total number of swings by the player (step 58, FIG. 6). The program displays this additional swing on the scoreboard located on the lower left corner of the screen.
  • [0102]
    When the player answers the question correctly, the program adds bonus yards to the player's swing. The bonus yards will range between 2 and 30, and are calculated by multiplying the time remaining on the timer by two. For example, if the user selected a 6 iron (min distance of 160 yards) and answers the question correctly with 13 seconds remaining on the clock (i.e., in 2 seconds), the program would move the player's ball 186 yards towards the green. Due to the bonus yards, each club has a maximum yardage equal to the minimum yardage plus 30 yards.
  • [0103]
    Once the yards have been calculated, the program determines if the user answered the question in under five seconds, while swinging outside of the rough or sand, and if the user has accumulated enough yardage to land the ball on the green (step 59). If these conditions are met, then the program probabilistically determines whether the player is capable of sinking the ball in the hole. Specifically, whenever the user has accumulated enough yards to enter the green, and the player was not in the rough or sand in the prior shot, then the player has a one percent chance of getting a hole-in-one. Accordingly the program offers a another incentive to the player for quickly answering the questions.
  • [0104]
    After the program determines that player received a hole-in-one (step 69), the program sinks the ball into the cup, advances the player to the next hole (step 70) and returns the player to the hole preview screen, at step 24, on FIG. 3. At the hole preview screen, the program determines if the player has played all 18 holes (step 25). If the player has not played all 18 holes, then the program allows the player to play the next hole.
  • [0105]
    Returning to FIG. 6, the player's ball is placed on the green if the player took more than 5 seconds to answer the question, or was in the sand or rough, and then drove the ball to the green. If the player was not in the rough or sand, the distance that the ball lands from the pin is the number of seconds taken to answer the question, multiplied by 2 feet. If the player was in the rough or sand, then the distance is the time taken to answer the question, plus 7, multiplied by 2 feet. The extra 7 seconds is a penalty for landing in the rough or sand Upon moving the ball, the program goes to step 33, FIG. 4, where the player continues to play the hole.
  • [0106]
    Placing the ball at a distance of two feet per second is appropriate for a typical course. Typically, a green has a thirty foot radius. Accordingly, if the user takes 15 seconds to correctly answer the question, and the user would land on the green, the user is placed thirty feet from the pin.
  • [0107]
    Upon moving the ball, the program goes to step 33, FIG. 4, where the program determines if the player has had 10 swings (step 37). If the player has not reached this swing limit, the player continues to play the hole.
  • [0108]
    Once the player is on the green, the difficulty of a question depends on the distance to the tee. There are five levels of difficulty in each set of 600 questions. When the user's ball is between 30 feet and 25 feet from the pin, the program asks the user the fifth level, or most difficult, questions. When the user's ball is between 24 and 19 feet from the pin, the program asks the user the fourth level of questions. When the user's ball is between 18 and 13 feet from the pin, the program asks the user the third level of questions. When the user's ball is between 12 and 7 feet from the pin, the program asks the user the second level of questions. When the user's ball is between 1 and 6 feet from the pin, the program asks the user the first, or easiest level of question.
  • [0109]
    The different level of questions on the green provides the skilled user a unique strategy on the green. For example, a user might quickly reach the green, but land between 19 and 30 feet from the pin. Here, the user will be presented with a fourth or fifth level of question, respectively, which the user might be unable to answer. The user can take a guess and know that the user will be moved half way towards the pin even if the answer was incorrect. If the answer was incorrect, the distance is halved, and the user will be placed between 9 and 15 feet from the pin. At the new location, the user will be presented with a question in the second or third level of difficulty, depending on the exact distance to the pin. Alternatively, the user might guess the correct answer and sink the ball in the hole.
  • [0110]
    In use, the player seeks to advance through each hole in the programmed course while attempting to achieve a minimum score. This goal is reached if the player chooses clubs with greater swingweights, so that the program asks the most difficult questions, and the player correctly and quickly answers the questions.
  • [0111]
    According to the above disclosure, a trivia program is provided where the user advances most rapidly by quickly and correctly answering relatively difficult questions. The program randomly selects a category from a group of categories, while the program allows the user to control the relative difficulty of the questions from a group of questions that range from least to most difficult.
  • [0112]
    The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from its spirit or essential characteristics. The described embodiments are to be considered in all respects only as illustrative and not as restrictive. The scope of the invention is, therefore, indicated by the appended claims and their combination in whole or in part rather than by the foregoing description. All changes that come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are to be embraced within their scope.
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Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis463/9
Classification internationaleA63F3/00, A63F13/10, A63F9/18
Classification coopérativeA63F2300/8011, A63F13/80, A63F2300/8064, A63F13/44, A63F3/0005, A63F2009/188, A63F13/10
Classification européenneA63F13/10