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Numéro de publicationUS20060036251 A1
Type de publicationDemande
Numéro de demandeUS 10/914,629
Date de publication16 févr. 2006
Date de dépôt9 août 2004
Date de priorité9 août 2004
Autre référence de publicationDE05782575T1, DE05782575T8, EP1791480A1, EP1791480A4, US7922765, US8202305, US8308779, US8840623, US8840651, US9561063, US9743969, US20060036322, US20080065215, US20080154316, US20100292738, US20110184478, US20130131739, US20140142644, US20140222150, US20150005832, WO2006020463A1
Numéro de publication10914629, 914629, US 2006/0036251 A1, US 2006/036251 A1, US 20060036251 A1, US 20060036251A1, US 2006036251 A1, US 2006036251A1, US-A1-20060036251, US-A1-2006036251, US2006/0036251A1, US2006/036251A1, US20060036251 A1, US20060036251A1, US2006036251 A1, US2006036251A1
InventeursMark Reiley
Cessionnaire d'origineReiley Mark A
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Systems and methods for the fixation or fusion of bone
US 20060036251 A1
Résumé
A stem-like bone fixation device allows for bony in-growth on its surface and across fracture fragments or between bones that are to be fused.
Images(6)
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Revendications(13)
1. A bone fixation device for stabilizing bone segments
comprising a stem adapted for passage between bone segments, at least a portion of the stem including a surface permitting bony in-growth.
2. A bone fixation device as in claim 1
wherein the stem structure is of a cylindrical configuration.
3. A bone fixation device as in claim 1
wherein the stem is of a conical configuration.
4. A bone fixation device as in claim 1
wherein the stem is cannulated.
5. A bone fixation device as in claim 1
wherein the stem includes a threaded end portion for coupling with another stem.
6. A bone fixation device as in claim 1
wherein the stem comprises a prosthetic material.
7. A bone fixation device as in claim 1
wherein the stem comprises a biologic material.
8. A bone fixation device as in claim 1
wherein the stem includes a fenestration permitting passage of another stem.
9. A bone fixation device as in claim 1
wherein the stem is cannulated.
10. A bone fixation device as in claim 1
wherein the stem is threaded.
11. A bone fixation device according to claim 1
further comprising a coupling to couple the stem with another stem:
12. A method for bone fracture fixation using the bone fixation device as defined in claim 1.
13. A method for bone fixation using the bone fixation device as defined in claim 1.
Description
    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    This application relates generally to the fixation of bone.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    Many types of hardware are available both for fracture fixation and for the fixation of bones that are to fused (arthrodesed).
  • [0003]
    Metal and absorbable screws are routinely used to fixate bone fractures and osteotomies. It is important to the successful outcome of the procedure that the screw is able to generate the compressive forces helpful in promoting bone healing.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0004]
    The invention provides bone fixation devices and related methods for stabilizing bone segments. The systems and methods include a stem-like structure adapted for passage between adjacent bone segments. At least a portion of the stem-like structure includes a surface that enhances bony in-growth. Boney in-growth into the stem-like structure helps speed up the fusion process or fracture healing time.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0005]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a bone fixation stem having a boney in-growth surface of a mesh configuration.
  • [0006]
    FIG. 2 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of a bone fixation stem having a boney in-growth surface of a beaded configuration.
  • [0007]
    FIG. 3 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of a bone fixation stem having a boney in-growth surface of a trabecular configuration.
  • [0008]
    FIG. 4 is a schematic view of a bone fixation stem of the type shown in Fig. being inserted into bone across a fracture line or bone joint.
  • [0009]
    FIG. 5 is a schematic view of a bone fixation stem positioned within bone and illustrating a boney in-growth surface of the stem extending across a fracture line or bone joint.
  • [0010]
    FIG. 6 is a front plan view of an alternative embodiment of a bone fixation stem having a boney in-growth surface in which the stem has a conical configuration.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 7 is front plan view of an alternative embodiment of a bone fixation stem having a boney in-growth surface in which the stem has a beveled distal tip.
  • [0012]
    FIGS. 8A and 8B are schematics illustrating the insertion of a conical bone fixation stem of the type shown in FIG. 6 to reduce the gap between bone segments.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 9 is a schematic illustrating a guidewire being introduced into bone across bone segments.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 10 is a schematic similar to FIG. 9 and illustrating a drill bit being introduced over the guidewire.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 11 is a schematic similar to FIG. 10 and illustrating a bore formed in the bone remaining after withdrawal of the drill bit.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 12 is a schematic similar to FIG. 11 and illustrating insertion of a bone fixation stem into the pre-formed bore.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 13 is an exploded front plan view illustrating the coupling of a pair of bone fixation stems by threaded engagement.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 14 is a schematic illustrating a pair of bone fixation stems coupled together and inserted into bone across multiple bone segments.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 15 is a front plan view illustrating passage of a bone fixation stem through a fenestration in another bone fixation stem.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 16 is a schematic illustrating the placement of a series of bone fixation stems in bone.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0021]
    Although the disclosure hereof is detailed and exact to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention, the physical embodiments herein disclosed merely exemplify the invention that may be embodied in other specific structure. While the preferred embodiment has been described, the details may be changed without departing from the invention, which is defined by the claims.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 1 shows a device 10 sized and configured for the fixation of bone fractures or for the fixation of bones which are to be fused (arthrodesed). The device 10 comprises an elongated, stem-like structure. The device 10 can be formed—e.g., by machining, molding, or extrusion—from a material usable in the prosthetic arts, including, but not limited to, titanium, titanium alloys, tantalum, chrome cobalt, surgical steel, or any other total joint replacement metal and/or ceramic, sintered glass, artificial bone, any uncemented metal or ceramic surface, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, the device 10 may be formed from a suitable durable biologic material or a combination of metal and biologic material, such as a biocompatible bone-filling material. The device 10 may be molded from a flowable biologic material, e.g., acrylic bone cement, that is cured, e.g., by UV light, to a non-flowable or solid material.
  • [0023]
    The device 10 can take various shapes and have various cross-sectional geometries. The device 10 can have, e.g., a generally curvilinear (i.e., round or oval) cross-section, or a generally rectilinear cross section (i.e., square or rectangular), or combinations thereof. As will be described in greater detail later, the device 10 can be conical or wedge shaped.
  • [0024]
    The structure 10 includes surface texturing 12 along at least a portion of its length to promote bony in-growth on its surface. The surface texturing 12 can comprise, e.g., through holes, and/or various surface patterns, and/or various surface textures, and/or pores, or combinations thereof. The device 10 can be coated or wrapped or surfaced treated to provide the surface texturing 12, or it can be formed from a material that itself inherently possesses a surface conducing to bony in-growth, such as a porous mesh, hydroxyapetite, or other porous surface. The device 10 may further be covered with various other coatings such as antimicrobial, antithrombotic, and osteoinductive agents, or a combination thereof. The surface texturing 12 may be impregnated with such agents, if desired.
  • [0025]
    The configuration of the surface texturing 12 can, of course, vary. By way of examples, FIG. 1 shows the surface 12 as an open mesh configuration; FIG. 2 shows the surface 12 as beaded configuration; and FIG. 3 shows the surface 12 as a trabecular configuration. Any configuration conducive to bony in-growth will suffice.
  • [0026]
    In use (see FIGS. 4 and 5), the device 10 is inserted into a space between two adjacent bone surfaces, e.g., into a fracture site or between two bones (e.g., adjacent vertebral bodies) which are to be fused together. In FIG. 4, the device 10 is shown being tapped into bone through bone segments 14 (i.e., across a fracture line or between adjacent bones to be fused) with a tap 16. The bone may be drilled first to facilitate insertion of the device 10. The bony in-growth surface 12 along the surface of the device 10 accelerates bony in-growth into the device 10. Boney in-growth into the device 10 helps speed up the fusion process or fracture healing time.
  • [0027]
    The bony in-growth surface 12 may cover the entire outer surface of the device 10, as shown in FIG. 4, or the bony in-growth surface 12 may cover just a specified distance on either side of the joint surface or fracture line, as shown in FIG. 5.
  • [0028]
    The size and configuration of the device 10 can be varied to accommodate the type and location of the bone to be treated as well as individual anatomy.
  • [0029]
    As FIG. 6 shows, the device 10 can be angled or tapered in a conical configuration. The degree of angle can be varied to accommodate specific needs or individual anatomy. A lesser degree of angle (i.e., a more acute angle) decreases the risk of splitting the bone as the device 10 is tapped into the bone or the fracture segments 14. The device 10 may also include a beveled distal tip 18 to further add in insertion of the device 10 into bone, as shown in FIG. 7. As shown in FIGS. 8A and BB, the conical shape also helps drive the joint surfaces or fracture fragments together, reducing the gap (G) between the bone segments 14.
  • [0030]
    In FIGS. 9 to 12, the device 10 is cannulated, having a central lumen or throughbore 20 extending through it, to assist in the placement of the device 10 within bone.
  • [0031]
    In use, the physician can insert a conventional guide pin 22 through the bone segments 14 by conventional methods, as FIG. 9 shows. A cannulated drill bit 24 can then be introduced over the guide pin 22, as seen in FIG. 10. A single or multiple drill bits 24 can be employed to drill through bone fragments or bone surfaces to create a bore 26 of the desired size and configuration. In the illustrated embodiment, the drill bit 24 is sized and configured to create a conical bore 26 similar in size and configuration to the device 10. The bore 26 is desirably sized and configured to permit tight engagement of the device 10 within the bore 26 and thereby restrict movement of the device 10 within the bore 26. The pre-formed bore 26 may be slightly smaller than the device 10, while still allowing the device 10 to be secured into position within the bore 26 by tapping. As seen in FIG. 11, the drill bit 24 is then withdrawn. The device 10 is then inserted into the bore 26 over the guide pin 22, as FIG. 12 shows. The guide pin 22 is then withdrawn.
  • [0032]
    Alternatively, the device 10 itself can include screw-like threads along the body for screwing the device into place. In the arrangement, the device 10 be self-tapping. Also in this arrangement, the device 10 can be cannulated for use with a guide pin 22, or it need not be cannulated.
  • [0033]
    Multiple devices 10 may be employed to provide additional stabilization. While the use of multiple devices 10 will now be described illustrating the use of multiple devices 10 of the same size and configuration, it is contemplated that the devices 10 may also be of different size and/or configuration, e.g., one device 10 is of a cylindrical configuration and a second device 10 is of a conical configuration.
  • [0034]
    In many cases, it may be desirable to couple a series of devices 10 together, e.g., to provide stabilization over a larger surface area. A series of devices 10 may be coupled together be any suitable means, e.g., by a snap fit engagement or a groove and tab key arrangement. In one embodiment, a series of devices 10 are coupled by threaded engagement. As illustrated in FIG. 13, a first device 10A includes a recess 28 at one end providing a series of internal threads 30. In the illustrated embodiment, the first device 10 is of a cylindrical configuration, but may be of any desired configuration. The internal threads 30 couple with a series of complementary external threads 32 on a second device 10B of a similar or of a different configuration to couple the first and second devices 10A and 10B together.
  • [0035]
    The devices 10A and 10B are desirably coupled together prior to being inserted into the pre-formed bore 26. The series of internal and external threads 30 and 32 provide an interlocking mechanism that permits a series of devices 10 to be stacked and connected to cover a larger area or multiple bone segments 14 (e.g., a bone having multiple fractures) and thereby provides additional stabilization, as seen in FIG. 14.
  • [0036]
    FIG. 15 illustrates another embodiment in which a device 10′ includes an opening or fenestration 34 to allow another device 10 to pass through, thereby providing additional stabilization. The fenestration 34 can be sized and configured to permit another device 10 to be passed through the device 10′ at virtually any angle. The fenestration 34 can also be sized and configured to limit movement of the second device 10 relative to the second device 10′.
  • [0037]
    In use, and as shown in FIG. 16, the physician taps a first device 10′ having a fenestration 34 through the bone segments. A second device 10 is then inserted (e.g., by tapping) through the fenestration 34 of the first device 10′ into place.
  • [0038]
    It is further contemplated that device 10′ may also be adapted for coupling with another device 10A (e.g., by a series of external and internal threads), permitting the devices 10′ and 10A to be additionally stacked and connected, as also shown in FIG. 16.
  • [0039]
    The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Furthermore, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described. While the preferred embodiment has been described, the details may be changed without departing from the invention, which is defined by the claims.
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Événements juridiques
DateCodeÉvénementDescription
5 sept. 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: INBONE TECHNOLOGIES, INC., COLORADO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:REILEY, MARK A.;REEL/FRAME:019804/0608
Effective date: 20070610
26 avr. 2011ASAssignment
Owner name: SI-BONE INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:INBONE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:026183/0195
Effective date: 20101013