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Numéro de publicationUS20070213111 A1
Type de publicationDemande
Numéro de demandeUS 11/592,744
Date de publication13 sept. 2007
Date de dépôt3 nov. 2006
Date de priorité4 nov. 2005
Numéro de publication11592744, 592744, US 2007/0213111 A1, US 2007/213111 A1, US 20070213111 A1, US 20070213111A1, US 2007213111 A1, US 2007213111A1, US-A1-20070213111, US-A1-2007213111, US2007/0213111A1, US2007/213111A1, US20070213111 A1, US20070213111A1, US2007213111 A1, US2007213111A1
InventeursPeter Maclver, Lori Broda, James Lincoln, David Artuso
Cessionnaire d'originePeter Maclver, Lori Broda, James Lincoln, David Artuso
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
DVD games
US 20070213111 A1
Résumé
Games are provided to be played in conjunction with a DVD player. Game instructions and commands may be recorded on DVD media with clips that present activities to the players. Clips may be randomly selected and completion of the activities presented may affect the scores of the players or teams. The activities may be associated with different skill sets. Players may also be provided with a board and tokens. Players may be provided with a remote game device that can receive information from the DVD player. Players may also have a game board that can recognize tokens and their placement on the game board and transmit that information to the DVD player. The game board may be able to receive information from the DVD player and display the information on a screen on the board.
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Revendications(35)
1. A DVD gaming system comprising:
a DVD player;
a DVD media disk including audiovisual clips and game commands;
an audio/video display operatively connected to the DVD player; and
at least one remote game device;
the DVD player configured to execute game commands to play a game with a beginning, an end and a score;
select an audiovisual clip from the DVD media disk as part of game play;
display the selected audiovisual clip;
execute commands in response to input from the remote game device; and
repeat the selection, display and receiving steps at least once as part of game play;
wherein at least one displayed audiovisual clip includes a word puzzle including letters of a target word or definitions of words; and
instructions for solving the puzzle that includes spelling words or defining words.
2. The DVD gaming system of claim 1 wherein the audiovisual clip is selected randomly.
3. The DVD gaming system of claim 1 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a puzzle including a target word, a plurality of word definitions including a definition of the target word, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include identifying a definition from the plurality of word definitions.
4. The DVD gaming system of claim 1 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a puzzle including a word, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include spelling the word.
5. The DVD gaming system of claim 1 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a puzzle including a word, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include spelling the word backwards.
6. A DVD gaming system comprising:
a DVD player;
a DVD media disk including audiovisual clips and game commands;
an audio/video display operatively connected to the DVD player; and
at least one remote game device;
the DVD player configured to execute game commands to play a game with a beginning, an end and a score;
select an audiovisual clip from the DVD media disk as part of game play;
display the selected audiovisual clip;
execute commands in response to input from the remote game device; and
repeat the selection, display and receiving steps at least once as part of game play;
wherein at least one displayed audiovisual clip includes a word puzzle; and
instructions for solving the puzzle that include drawing an image, performing pantomime or speaking individual words to elicit a puzzle solution.
7. The DVD gaming system of claim 6 wherein the audiovisual clip is selected randomly.
8. The DVD gaming system of claim 6 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a word puzzle including a target word, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include selecting and saying individual words distinct from the target word to elicit the target word.
9. The DVD gaming system of claim 6 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a word puzzle including a target word, and a set of restricted words associated with the target word, instructions that include selecting and presenting a third distinct set of one or more words to elicit the target word.
10. The DVD gaming system of claim 6 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a word puzzle including a target word, and instructions to solve the puzzle that includes drawing an image associated with the target word to elicit the target word.
11. The DVD gaming system of claim 6 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a word puzzle including a target word, and instructions to solve the puzzle that include sculpting putty to elicit the target word.
12. The DVD gaming system of claim 6 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a word puzzle including a song title, and instructions to solve the puzzle that include singing, humming or whistling the identified song to elicit the song title.
13. The DVD gaming system of claim 6 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a word puzzle including playing a portion of a song with lyrics, and instructions to solve the puzzle that include identifying additional lyrics of the song.
14. The DVD gaming system of claim 6 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a word puzzle including a target word, phrase or name, and instructions to solve the puzzle that include acting or pantomiming, without words, to elicit the target word.
15. A DVD gaming system comprising:
a DVD player;
a DVD media disk including audiovisual clips and game commands;
an audio/video display operatively connected to the DVD player; and
at least one remote game device;
the DVD player configured to execute game commands to play a game with a beginning, an end and a score;
select an audiovisual clip from the DVD media disk as part of game play;
display the selected audiovisual clip;
execute commands in response to input from the remote game device; and
repeat the selection, display and receiving steps at least once as part of game play;
wherein at least one displayed audiovisual clip displays a puzzle including a plurality of alphanumeric characters; and
instructions to solve the puzzle that include adding alphanumeric characters to those displayed or rearrangement of the displayed alphanumeric characters.
16. The DVD gaming system of claim 15 wherein the audiovisual clip is selected randomly.
17. The DVD gaming system of claim 15 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a word puzzle that includes a plurality of letters, and instructions to solve the puzzle that include reordering the letters to spell a word or phrase.
18. The DVD gaming system of claim 15 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a number puzzle that includes a grid with spaces including, a set of grid spaces with a numeral in each space, at least one blank grid space without numerals, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include selecting numerals to fill the at least one blank grid space such that each row has no repeating numerals, and each column has no repeating numerals.
19. The DVD gaming system of claim 15 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a crossword puzzle including a first and a second word, each word disposed horizontally or vertically on a finite grid, and a plurality of seriate indicia disposed horizontally or vertically on the grid, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include selecting a letter for each indicia position to form a third word which includes at least one character included in the first word where at least one of the seriate indicia is adjacent to a letter of the first word and at least one letter of the second word is adjacent to an indicia or a letter of the first word.
20. The DVD gaming system of claim 15 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a puzzle including a first displayed phrase associated with a homophonic second phrase not displayed, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include identifying the second phrase.
21. A DVD gaming system comprising:
a DVD player;
a DVD media disk including audiovisual clips and game commands;
an audio/video display operatively connected to the DVD player; and
at least one remote game device;
the DVD player configured to execute game commands to play a game with a beginning, an end and a score;
select an audiovisual clip from the DVD media disk as part of game play;
display the selected audiovisual clip;
execute commands in response to input from the remote game device; and
repeat the selection, display and receiving steps at least once as part of game play;
wherein at least one audiovisual clip displays a puzzle comprising a first element that includes a picture or a portion of a picture, a second element, and instructions for solving the puzzle.
22. The DVD gaming system of claim 21 wherein the audiovisual clip is selected randomly.
23. The DVD gaming system of claim 21 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a rebus puzzle further comprising elements including, a first picture element, and at least one additional element selected from the group of a picture, an alphanumeric character or a plurality of letters, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include identifying a phrase associated with the puzzle elements.
24. The DVD gaming system of claim 21 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a puzzle further including a plurality of picture elements comprising portions of a source picture, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include identifying the source picture from which the picture elements were segregated and rearranged.
25. The DVD gaming system of claim 21 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a puzzle further including at least three pictures where all the images except one are related by a theme or aspect, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include selecting the one excepted image.
26. The DVD gaming system of claim 21 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a puzzle including a picture showing an activity, and a plurality of selectable words or phrases, each word or phrase with an associated characteristic activity, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include selecting the word or phrase where the picture activity is most closely associated with the word or phrase activity.
27. The DVD gaming system of claim 21 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a puzzle further including a picture showing at least one object, and the name of an object, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include finding the named object in the picture.
28. The DVD gaming system of claim 21 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a puzzle including a first picture followed by a second picture, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include identifying an object in the first picture that is missing or modified in the second picture.
29. The DVD gaming system of claim 21 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a puzzle including a picture, a story or the name of a store associated with the picture, and instructions for solving the puzzle that include identifying an object included in the story that is missing or changed in the picture.
30. A DVD gaming system comprising:
a DVD player;
a DVD media disk including audiovisual clips and game commands;
an audio/video display operatively connected to the DVD player; and
at least one remote game device;
the DVD player configured to:
execute game commands to play a game with a beginning, an end and a score;
select an audiovisual clip from the DVD media disk as part of game play;
display the selected audiovisual clip;
execute commands in response to input from the remote game device; and
repeat the selection, display and receiving steps at least once as part of game play;
wherein at least one audiovisual clip displays a player challenge that includes instructions to simultaneously perform a physical challenge and select objects in a category or select and speak words.
31. The DVD gaming system of claim 30 wherein the audiovisual clip is selected randomly.
32. The DVD gaming system of claim 30 wherein the audiovisual clip displays a player physical challenge that includes instructions to hop on one foot.
33. The DVD gaming system of claim 30 further including floor markers coded by colors or symbols for placement on the floor, wherein the audiovisual clip displays a player activity including an activity demonstration, and instructions to select and touch a floor marker identified by a designated color or symbol with hands or feet.
34. A DVD gaming system comprising:
a DVD player;
a DVD media disk including audiovisual clips and game commands;
an audio/video display operatively connected to the DVD player; and
at least one remote game device;
the DVD player configured to:
execute game commands to play a game with a beginning, an end and a score;
select an audiovisual clip from the DVD media disk as part of game play;
display the selected audiovisual clip;
execute commands in response to input from the remote game device; and
repeat the selection, display and receiving steps at least once as part of game play;
wherein at least one audiovisual clip displays:
a puzzle including a first view of a list of possible answers followed by a second view with a plurality of questions; and
instructions for solving the puzzle that include selecting one from the list of possible answers in the first view that answers all the questions in the second view.
35. The DVD gaming system of claim 34 wherein the audiovisual clip is selected randomly.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE
  • [0001]
    This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/733,494, filed Nov. 4, 2005, and entitled “DVD Games,” U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/286,317 filed Nov. 22, 2005, published as U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 20060175753 published Aug. 10, 2006 and entitled “Electronic Game Board,” U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/383,124, filed May 12, 2006, and entitled “Remote Game Device For DVD Gaming Systems” and U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/801,447 filed Mar. 12, 2004, published as U.S. Patent Publication No. 20050014563 published Jan. 20, 2005 and entitled “Interactive DVD Gaming System,” all of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety for all purposes.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    The present disclosure relates to video games that may require players to engage in various physical and mental activities and more specifically to such video games and game systems that may be implemented on a conventional DVD player.
  • [0003]
    Examples of games that require players to engage in various physical and mental activities include “Pictionary”® by Mattel, Inc., “Cranium”® by Cranium, Inc. (see U.S. Pat. No. 6,279,909), “Taboo”® by Hasbro, Inc., “Party & Co” by Diset S. A. and “Buzzerk CD Party Game” by PrankPlace Novelties, Inc. Examples of video games that are implemented on a conventional DVD player include “SceneIt”® by Screenlife, LLC (see U.S. Published Patent Application Nos. US200422520; US200448642; US200451248; and US200554407). Examples of games with skill categories and game systems implemented on a DVD are found in EP1400267; WO2004010389, U.S. Published Patent Application Nos. US20040048642; US20040054826; US20040140997; US20040140998; US20040166915; US20040188941; US20050026699; US20050054407; US20050073097; US20060012123 and U.S. Pat. Nos. 1,569,945; 4,807,031; 5,094,465; 5,213,337; 5,251,904; 5,584,484; 5,607,160; 5,895,050; 5,906,371; 6,267,376; 6,279,909; 6,497,412; 6,520,504; 6,685,187; 6,692,358 and 6,773,349.
  • [0004]
    The disclosures of all of the patents, published patent applications, and other publications recited in this application, including those identified above, are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety for all purposes.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0005]
    Games are disclosed which may be implemented at least in part from a DVD-Video disk in a conventional DVD player. The disclosed games may be provided on DVD media having scripts recorded thereon and may be implemented using the memory storage means of the DVD player to hold game variables. Scenes may be generated by the DVD player accessing audio visual clips on the DVD media which may be displayed on a television. Clips may be randomly selected. The scenes may provide activity instructions for players to solve a puzzle, answer a question in order to score points or move a token on a game board along a path.
  • [0006]
    The disclosed games may involve only one kind of physical activity, mental activity or skill, or the games may involve a wide range of activities or skills. Requiring players to engage in a range of human skills creates an appeal to the game for a broader demographic of players and helps to maintain the interest of those playing the game. Generally, human activities and skills may be divided into eight groups, as suggested by Dr. Howard Gardner in a 1983 book entitled, “Frames of the Mind. The Theory of Multiple Intelligences,” the contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference. According to Dr. Gardner, these eight basic groups are (1) language, (2) spatial, (3) musical, (4) logical-mathematical, (5) physical, (6) interpersonal, (7) intrapersonal and (8) natural skills. Activities in the games of this disclosure may draw from some or all of these human activities and skills.
  • [0007]
    In some examples, the disclosed games may incorporate a game board with a game path and tokens for each player or team. In some examples, the disclosed games may include a handheld and/or a board remote game device which may incorporate functionality to send signals and commands to the DVD player. The remote game device may be a standard DVD remote supplied with the DVD player or may be a handheld or board remote game device supplied with the DVD game media. The handheld or board remote game device may be able to interact with the television and DVD player by receiving data through audio signals. This may allow specific players to receive data, clues, or solutions to the puzzles and questions without the other players seeing the data or solutions.
  • [0008]
    Because DVD game systems utilize a standard DVD player, a user who has already purchased and set up such a DVD player may play games without having to purchase a separate gaming console or connect additional equipment to the user's television, which may not have the appropriate inputs for connecting such equipment. Games played on a DVD player may appeal to a broader demographic, including individuals who may be unable to, or do not desire to, play games on proprietary gaming consoles.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0009]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an exemplary DVD game system including a DVD player accessing a DVD media disk, a game board, tokens, a television and a DVD remote with the game system displaying game activities.
  • [0010]
    FIG. 2 is an example of a DVD game activity on a DVD system including a standard DVD player accessing a DVD media disk and a TV where the player is provided with a set of clues and prompted to provide a person's name associated with those clues.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 3 is an example of a game activity where the player is prompted to sound out and interpret nonsense phrases.
  • [0012]
    FIG. 4 is an example of a game activity including a word puzzle and a clue where the player must solve the puzzle.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 5 is an example of a game activity where the player is prompted to select from a group of objects one object that is not common to that group.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 6 is an example of a game activity including a picture that has been divided into parts and rearranged and the player is prompted to identify the title of the picture or the original subject of the picture.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 7 is an example of a game activity including a number puzzle where numbers are missing and the player must determine the missing numbers that will solve the puzzle.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 8 is an example of a game activity including a word puzzle where the letters are rearranged from the original word and the original word may be determined.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 9 is an example of a game activity including a rebus picture puzzle that represents a phrase or word.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 10 is an example of a game activity where the player is prompted to select the correct answer to the question from a list of answers.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 11 is an example flow chart showing steps executed by the DVD game system to play a game with multiple categories of skill sets and activities.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 12 is a perspective view of a DVD game system similar to FIGS. 1 and 2 including a DVD player accessing a DVD media disk, a television and a handheld remote game device displaying target and forbidden words in response to a signal from the television speakers as part of a word game while the television displays the game scores.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 13 is an example flow chart showing steps during game play with a remote game device.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 14 is a perspective view of a DVD game system with a word game similar to FIGS. 1 and 2 including a DVD player accessing a DVD media disk, a television and an electronic game board with functionality to communicate with the game system to send and receive information.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 15 is an example flow chart showing steps by players during game play of a game with an electronic board that receives signals.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0024]
    Referring to FIG. 1, a DVD game system 10 is shown. DVD game system 10 may include a DVD player 12, a DVD or media or media disk 14, a television 16 operatively connected to DVD player 12 and a DVD remote control 18. Television 16 is shown displaying a clip or game activity 20. Activities 20 may include puzzles with solutions and player challenges.
  • [0025]
    DVD media disk 14 may contain commands and audiovisual media clips for generating scenes and sounds at television 16 associated with a game to be played by one or more players. Audiovisual clips from media disk 14 may comprise a puzzle, an answer and additional supporting material including text, music, pictures or video images. DVD game commands may include instructions for selecting the clips to play, configuring the game for the number of teams playing, and maintaining a score for each team. Game system 10 may utilize memory in DVD player 12 to store game parameters and implement game functions. DVD remote control 18 may be configured to send wireless commands to DVD player 12 causing DVD player 12 to change configuration or execute commands.
  • [0026]
    DVD player 12 may have limited memory and may be substantially configured to access DVD media disk 14 and display audio visual material from media disk 14 at television 16. DVD player 12 may have a limited number of ports for connecting to peripheral devices. DVD remote control 18 may be supplied with DVD player 12 at purchase.
  • [0027]
    In some embodiments, the DVD game may involve just one kind of activity 20. Referring still to FIG. 1, an example game activity is shown, referred to here as “You Can't Say That.” A first player may take a turn by facing away from television 16 so they cannot see the screen. An activity 20 may be presented on television 16 seen only by a second player. For example, the screen may display one target word and several forbidden words. To complete the challenge, the second player may select another set of words distinct from the target word and forbidden words. The second player may provide the selected words as clues to get the first player to associate with and say the target word.
  • [0028]
    Points may be awarded for correct answers. Points may be taken away for not answering correctly. A timer may be displayed on television 16 and points awarded may depend on the time required to answer correctly. DVD remote control 18 may be used to stop the timer when a correct answer is provided. Alternatively, additional puzzle clues may be displayed and points awarded base on the number of clues displayed when the puzzle is answered.
  • [0029]
    In another example, the DVD game may involve a game with a plurality of kinds of activities 20. Activities 20 used in the game may be directed to different human skills. This may maintain interest of players with different skills. Some players may be more challenged by questions that are not based on their primary skill set. Those players may find questions directed to their skill set to be easier to answer. Skills involved may include language skills, trivia, deduction, abstract thinking, acting and physical activities.
  • [0030]
    DVD video game system 10 may also comprise a game board 24 with markers or tokens 26 and a die or dice 28. Game board 24 may have a set of seriate spaces forming a path with a starting point and an ending point. Markers or tokens 26 may move along the seriate spaces as part of game play. Markers or tokens 26 may be used separately from board 24.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 2 is an example of game play 50 showing DVD player 12 accessing a DVD media disk 14 and a television 16. Television 16 displays an activity 20 as may be presented in the course of game play with multiple activities. Television 16 may display the text “Here are twenty facts about an American president. Name the president!” An additional fact or clue may be displayed every five seconds. Answering the question correctly on the first clue may add points to the score. The player may get one less point with each clue. An incorrect answer may get no points for the player or team or the score may be reduced. The player may use DVD remote control 18 to stop activity execution when an answer is provided by a player. Game system 10 may display the correct answer. The player may use DVD remote control 18 to indicate if the answer given matches the correct answer displayed. If the answer is correct, DVD player 12 may generate a new score for that team. If the answer is incorrect, the score for that team may remain the same or the score may decrease.
  • [0032]
    Activities may include puzzles with solutions and player challenges. For certain activities 20, information may be shown on a separate display only certain players can see as discussed below. Alternatively, the information may be displayed on television 16 while other teammates can't see the television screen.
  • [0033]
    FIG. 3 shows a word puzzle as may be presented by system 10. The puzzle may present a first phrase that is associated with a second phrase not displayed. The first and second phrase may be homophonic. Seeing written words of the first phrase may cause the player to recognize the first phrase without associating with the second phrase. The homophonic phrases may become more closely associated by a player when the player says the phrase out loud than when the player reads the words.
  • [0034]
    For example, the first phrase “What is this nonsense phrase trying to say? ‘Toes in Gel E’” may be displayed. Solving the puzzle may include the player saying the first and/or second phrase out loud. The second phrase “Toast 'n Jelly!” may be displayed after the first phrase is displayed. The first and second phrases may be homophonic.
  • [0035]
    Game system 10 may display a crossword puzzle as shown in FIG. 4 that includes words on a grid, indicia for adding letters on the grid and a clue. The puzzle may be set out on the grid with words in vertical and/or horizontal positions in rows and/or columns. The puzzle may include indicia for the position of letters to be added which are also positioned on horizontal and or vertical positions. The indicia may be seriate with all indicia adjacent at least one other indicia and all indicia in one row or column. At least one indicia may be adjacent at least one letter in a word. “Adjacent” for the purpose of this disclosure indicates a grid position directly above, below, left or right of the subject grid space with at least one face in common, but not a grid positioned diagonally with only one corner in common.
  • [0036]
    System 10 may present a puzzle including several images, a subset of which have a common theme or aspect. One image may not incorporate the theme or aspect common to the other images. For example, the screen may display the words “Which of these objects is different?” The screen displays several objects such as three multifaceted objects with one spherical object as shown in FIG. 5 or, in another example not shown, several fruits and one vegetable. The player may solve the puzzle by selecting the one object that is different in theme or aspect.
  • [0037]
    Game system 10 may present a picture puzzle. For example, system 10 may display “The sections of this picture have been rearranged. What is it a picture of?” as shown in FIG. 6. In this example, the original or source picture is of a shark. The source picture has been segmented into four elements and the elements segregated and rearranged. The rearranged picture is then displayed. Solving the puzzle may include the player determining the source picture subject or, alternatively, in the case of a famous painting, naming the painting.
  • [0038]
    Game system 10 may present a number puzzle. Game system 10 may display “Solve this number puzzle” and a puzzle including a grid of spaces in a square or rectangle as shown in FIG. 7. Some spaces may be filled with numerals. Some spaces may not be filled with numerals and are blank. Solving the puzzle may include selecting numerals for each blank grid space such that each row has no repeating numerals and each column has no repeating numerals. All numerals may be from a defined and limited set, typically defined by the number of rows.
  • [0039]
    Game system 10 may present a word jumble puzzle. For example game system 10 may display “Unscramble these letters to form a word.” System 10 may also display the letters as shown in FIG. 8. Solving the puzzle may include rearranging the letters to form a common word.
  • [0040]
    Game system 10 may present a word jumble puzzle including multiple words to form phrases. For example, system 10 may display “The words in the following phrase are scrambled. Unscramble the individual words and say the phrase.” The nonsense phrase “To Mared Eth Pimbosslipe Mared” may also be displayed. The answer “To Dream the Impossible Dream” may be displayed after the first phrase is displayed.
  • [0041]
    Game system 10 may present a rebus puzzle. For example, game system 10 may display “Solve this rebus and say the word or phrase” with the picture puzzle as shown in FIG. 9. Solving the puzzle may include the player associating words with the pictures and combining the word sounds to say a word or phrase. The answer “Don Quixote” may be displayed after the first phrase is displayed. A rebus may include only picture elements as shown. A rebus puzzle may also include elements with alphanumeric characters or a plurality of letters.
  • [0042]
    Activity 20 may include player challenges. Game system 10 may display “What is the correct meaning of this word?” as shown in FIG. 10. The word “Inure” may be displayed along with several possible meanings, “A. Blue Parrot; B. Get used to; C. Legal Damages; D. Prepare for.” Solving the puzzle may include the player selecting the correct answer using remote control 18.
  • [0043]
    Game system 10 may display “Giving one word clues get your teammates to say this word.” A target word may be displayed so that some players may not be able to see. Completing the activity or challenge may include selecting words that when stated will elicit other players to associate with and repeat the target word.
  • [0044]
    Game system 10 may display “Using no words, only gestures, get your teammates to say this word:” The target word “Pyramid” may be displayed so that some players may not be able to see. Solving this puzzle may include a player acting and pantomiming without words in order to elicit other players to associate with and repeat the target word.
  • [0045]
    Game system 10 may display “Listen to the music and name the song.” Music is played by the game system 10 and the player may solve the puzzle by guessing the name of the song.
  • [0046]
    Game system 10 may display “Direct your teammate to draw shapes only (triangles circles, squares) to get other teammates to guess this phrase”. The word “Airplane” may be displayed so that some players may not be able to see. Solving the puzzle may include a player creating drawings that will elicit other players to associate with and repeat the target word.
  • [0047]
    Game system 10 may display “Without talking, only drawing, get your teammates to say this word.” The word “Pig” may be displayed so that some players may not be able to see. Solving the puzzle may include a player creating drawings that will elicit other players to associate with and repeat the target word.
  • [0048]
    Game system 10 may display “Without talking, draw a picture on your teammate's back, while the teammate copies your picture on paper, get your team to say this word.” The word “Dirigible” may be displayed so that some players may not be able to see. Solving the puzzle may include a player creating drawings that will elicit other players to associate with and repeat the target word.
  • [0049]
    Game system 10 may display “Without talking and with eyes closed, draw a picture and get your teammates to say this word.” The word “Bicycle” may be displayed so that some players may not be able to see. Solving the puzzle may include a player creating drawings that will elicit other players to associate with and repeat the target word.
  • [0050]
    Game system 10 may display “Without talking, pose a teammate and get other teammates to say this word.” The word “Cat” may be displayed so that some players may not be able to see. Solving this puzzle may include a player acting and pantomiming without words that will elicit other players to associate with and repeat the target word.
  • [0051]
    Game system 10 may display “Without talking and holding your teammates wrist with a pen in their hand, draw a picture and get your teammates to say this word” is displayed. The word “Camel” may be displayed so that some players may not be able to see. Solving the puzzle may include a player creating drawings that will elicit other players to associate with and repeat the target word.
  • [0052]
    Game system 10 may display “Without talking and by moving your lips, get your teammates to say this phrase.” is displayed. The word “One if by land” may be displayed so that some players may not be able to see. Solving this puzzle may include a player acting and pantomiming without words in order to elicit other players to associate with and repeat the target word.
  • [0053]
    Game system 10 may display “Hum or whistle this tune so your teammates can guess the name.” is displayed. The title “Theme from Green Acres” may be displayed so that some players may not be able to see.
  • [0054]
    Game system 10 may display “Mimic this person so your teammates can guess your identity.” The name “Winston Churchill” may be displayed so that some players may not be able to see. Solving this puzzle may include a player acting and pantomiming without words that will elicit other players to associate with and repeat the target word.
  • [0055]
    Game system 10 may display “Use putty to sculpt this object and get your teammates to guess what it is.” The word “Elephant” may be displayed so that some players may not be able to see.
  • [0056]
    Game system 10 may display “Spell this word backwards on the first try.” Solving the puzzle or challenge may involve spelling the word backwards.
  • [0057]
    Game system 10 may display “Pick a player from the other team to spell this word.” The word “Expectation” may be displayed so that certain players may not be able to see. Solving the puzzle may include a player attempting to spell the word.
  • [0058]
    Some activities 20 may be directed to a player's knowledge of history or current events. Game system 10 may display “Who invaded Spain in the 8th century A.D.?” Solving the puzzle may include a player trying to guess the answer.
  • [0059]
    “Copernicus believed the Earth rotated around the Sun. True or False?” is displayed. Solving the puzzle may include a player selecting the correct answer.
  • [0060]
    “Who was Millard Fillmore” is displayed with several possible answers. “A. First Secretary of the Treasury” “B. Cartoon Character”; “C. U.S. President.” Solving the puzzle may include a player selecting the correct answer.
  • [0061]
    “Who was King of England during the Revolutionary War?” is displayed with several possible answers. “A. George II; B. Louis XIV; C. Napoleon; D. Pope Pius III.” Solving the puzzle may include a player selecting the correct answer.
  • [0062]
    Questions may ask for a famous rejoinder. “I never forget a face!” may be displayed along with choices “A. Especially yours; B. In your case I'll make an exception; C. It's the curse I carry.” Solving the puzzle may include a player selecting the correct answer.
  • [0063]
    Some activities 20 may be physical such as “Hop on one foot and name all the vegetables you can without stopping or repeating the names.” A timer on the screen may time how long the player can continue.
  • [0064]
    Questions may involve establishing a correlation to a displayed activity and selected answers with characteristic activities. For example, a video may be displayed of a man crossing many lanes of heavy traffic. A list of video games may be displayed such as: “A. Tetris; B. Asteroids; C. Frogger; D. Pac Man.” Each of the answers is a video game with characteristic themes and activities.
  • [0065]
    The characteristic activity in the Frogger video game is the player tries to move a virtual character across several lanes of virtual traffic without colliding with the traffic. So Frogger would have a characteristic activity in common with the clip played. Frogger may be the correct answer since the activity in the video most closely resembles the activities in the game Frogger rather than the activities associated with other game choices.
  • [0066]
    Questions may be trick questions. “A rooster lays an egg at the very top of the barn. Does it roll down A. the East side or B. the West side?” The correct answer is: “Neither, roosters don't lay eggs!”
  • [0067]
    The game may provide a list of possible answers to questions. After the answers have been displayed, the game may provide multiple questions where both questions have the same answer. Solving the puzzle may include the player determining which answer previously supplied is the correct answer to all the questions.
  • [0068]
    Activities 20 may be grouped into categories based on human skills required to solve them. Skills may involve problem solving, factual knowledge, famous people, art or conceptual understanding. Game execution may incorporate selecting activities 20 based on these skill sets or categories. In some methods of game play, one team completes the activity presented. In other methods, both teams try to complete the activity before the other team. In some game play methods, clues may be provided to players. Clues may be provided by player request or clues may be provided automatically at set periods during activity completion. Clues may affect scores.
  • [0069]
    These activities are examples. More, fewer or different kinds of activities could be part of the game and fall within the scope of this disclosure.
  • [0070]
    A DVD remote control 18 or other device may be part of game play. Displaying an audiovisual clip may include playing audio media such as a song or sounds as well as visual media such as pictures and alphanumeric text.
  • [0071]
    FIG. 11 shows an example flow chart 100 for steps of game execution within game system 10. In this example, the game has categories of activities 20. The game may begin with DVD player 12 accessing DVD media disk 14 to execute game instructions and clips in step 102. In step 104 the number of teams may be configured in the system. In step 106 the scores may be set to 0 for all teams. A category of activities may be identified in step 108. The random number selection function may then select a number inclusive between zero and the number of clips minus one which are available in the category in step 110.
  • [0072]
    The selected clip correlating to that number may be displayed in step 112. The player may select an answer from those displayed on television 16 using DVD remote control 18 in step 114. DVD player 12 may then compute a score in step 116 based on the answer given and displays the score in step 118. In decision step 120, if the game is over, a final score is calculated at 122. A winner is determined and a clip displaying appropriate graphics and the score may be played in step 124. If the game is not over, the game loops back to step 108 and another round may be played. Game play may continue in this loop until the game is over.
  • [0073]
    Game configuration may include selecting a level of play that is different for different teams. For example, children may form one team and parents form a second team. Questions can be tailored to each team with more difficult questions being posed to the parents and less difficult questions for the children. This may allow players to play at their own level without the frustration of not being able to answer any questions or knowing all the answers.
  • [0074]
    Scoring may be based on time to answer. For some questions, the scoring may be based on the correct answer being selected in the time allowed. Answers may be selected from the screen using the remote to highlight a selection and then enter that selection as the correct answer. Answers may be entered from DVD remote control 18 as being correct or not correct as determined by other players. Game play may not involve any kind of remote and answers may be entered at DVD player 12.
  • [0075]
    In other embodiments, game play can be enhanced by using categories of questions in association with a game board. Questions may be categorized according to human skills required to answer the questions or complete activity 20 and game board spaces may be associated with specific skill sets.
  • [0076]
    DVD video game system 10 may include game board 24, markers or tokens 26 and die or dice 28. Game board 24 may have a set of seriate spaces forming a path with a starting point and an ending point. The seriate spaces may be broken down to subsets of spaces, each subset associated with a set of questions that are themselves associated with a specific skill set. For example, one subset of spaces distributed along the path of game board 24 may be associated with factual knowledge. Activities 20 associated with this group of spaces may all ask questions based on the player's knowledge of facts. Another subset of spaces distributed along the game board path may be associated with activities 20 where the player must solve a puzzle using problem solving skills.
  • [0077]
    Each team may have a token 26. Token or marker 26 may be a physical object with depth and/or height or may be a flat cutout with indicia or colors. As part of game play, token 26 may be moved along the game board path With each space having an associated set of activities. Token 26 may be moved along the path a number of spaces determined by rolling die or dice 28.
  • [0078]
    The game may use other methods than rolling dice to indicate the number or spaces to be moved. A random number generator in board 24, DVD system 10 or a remote game device may display the number of spaces to be moved. The number of spaces to be moved may be associated with activity 20. For example, successfully completing a specific activity may result in a number being displayed on the screen indicating the number of spaces the team's token can be moved. The number of spaces indicated may be a function of the activity.
  • [0079]
    The space the player lands on may indicate the set of activities 20 the player must pursue to get points. The spaces may be color coded to indicate the subset of activities 20 and skill the space is associated with or the space may use symbols to indicate the subset of activities 20 and skill it is associated with.
  • [0080]
    Game system 10 may include a handheld remote game device 30. In some embodiments, remote game device 30 may be capable of two way communication with components of game system 10. FIG. 12 shows the “You Can't Say That” game in another embodiment. Similar numbering is used in FIG. 12 as used in FIG. 1 for clarity. Again, DVD game system 10 includes DVD player 12, DVD media disk 14 and television 16 operatively connected to DVD player 12. Game system 10 may further include remote game device 30 with display 32. Remote game device 30 may have the ability to receive signals from game system 10 in order to display information. Remote game device 30 may also have functions normally associated with a DVD remote control 18 such as controlling DVD player 12 functions and controlling game execution.
  • [0081]
    Remote game device 30 may be able to receive signals from DVD player 12 through television 16. DVD media disk 14 may generate an electronic signal from DVD player 12 that is converted to an acoustic signal at television 16 as part of game execution, to communicate with remote game device 30. The tone signal may be received by remote game device 30 and data based on the tone signals may be shown on display 32. The commands sent by DVD player 12 and television 16 may be coded so that only one of several remote game devices being used simultaneously will respond to the signal. This may allow a single user to get specific game play information or commands. However, other signals may also be coded more generally, so that all the players may get the same information displayed on their remote game device displays 32. Alternatively, the game may utilize only one remote game device 30 for all the players.
  • [0082]
    Remote game device 30 may be used in conjunction with game system 10 by displaying information associated with activities 20 displayed on television 16 by game system 10. As an example from the “You Can't Say That” game, instead of the first player having to stand in front of television 16 to prevent them from seeing the target word, game system 10 may send the target word and forbidden words to remote game device 30 so only the second player can see it. In this way, no one is required to be physically positioned in any specific way to play the game.
  • [0083]
    Remote game device 30 may be used in conjunction with game system 10 with multiple activity 20 categories. From the previously described example television 16 may display “Using no words, only gestures, get your teammates to say this word:” Instead of the word being displayed on the television screen, the word may appear on remote game device display 32. Then only one team member may be able to see the target word. Other players are then not required to avoid seeing the target word on television 16.
  • [0084]
    Referring to FIG. 13, an example game flow chart 200 with steps for players of a game with one activity is shown. In this example, a remote game device 30 with display 32 is used which includes functionality to communicate to DVD player 12 and receive information from television 16 as shown on display 32. First, at step 202 players form teams. At step 204, game system 10 is configured to show the number of teams playing, the level of play, etc. The team whose turn it is may get remote game device 30 at step 206 and sends game system 10 a command to start activity 20 and a timer at step 208. Next, the team may receive and display a set of words at step 210 as part of a word game activity such as a word challenge. The team may complete activity 20 by guessing the target word at step 212. Game system 10 may compute a new set of scores at 214 and displays the score at step 216. If the game is over at 218, game system 10 computes the final scores at step 220 and displays the scores on television 16 with appropriate graphics at 222. If the game is not over at step 218, then the game may loop back to 206 and the next team gets remote game device 30 and game play continues.
  • [0085]
    In another embodiment, remote game device 30 may take the form of a game board that incorporates active electronics in board 24. FIG. 14 is a perspective view of a game system 10 with an electronic game board. Again, similar numbering is used as in previous figures for clarity. DVD game system 10 again includes DVD player 12, DVD media disk 14, television 16 operatively connected to DVD player 12, tokens 26 and die 28. Game system 10 further includes an electronic game board 34 used in a similar manner to game board 24. Game board 34 may include a display 36.
  • [0086]
    Game board 34 may have the capability to recognize individual tokens 26 sitting on board 34 and board 34 may be able to identify the location of token 26 on board 34. Board 34 may also be able to communicate with components of game system 10 in order to provide information to game system 10. For example, the player may move token 26 to a space on board 34. Board 34 may recognize token 26 as belonging to a specific team or player previously identified to game system 10.
  • [0087]
    Game system 10 may also be able to identify the category of activity 20 associated with the space token 26 is occupying on board 34. For example, the player may move token 26 to a space associated with problem solving. Board 34 may transmit to DVD player 12 identification information for the space the token is sitting on. Game system 10 may select an activity 20 associated with that space and displays selected activity 20 on television 16 to the player. The electronic game board 34 may be used together with a handheld remote game device 30 and/or remote control 18 or with no remote devices.
  • [0088]
    Board 34 may have additional capabilities such as generating random numbers to simulate rolls of dice. Board 34 may accept inputs from the players as to the next player or whether an answer is correct. Board 34 may have a display or screen 36 to display information such as the results of a dice roll. Board 34 may incorporate capabilities associated with remote game device 30 such as receiving information from game system 10 that is subsequently shown on a board display 36.
  • [0089]
    Referring to FIG. 15, an example game flow chart 300 for players of a game with different activities based on skill set categories is shown including an electronic board 34 with functionality to transmit token identity and location information to DVD player 12. At step 302, players form teams and select tokens. At step 304 game system 10 may be configured as to number of teams, token identities and game play difficulty. At step 306, game system 10 indicates a team for the next turn. A player may roll dice 28 at step 308 and moves token 26 at step 310. Game board 34 may send the token identification and location to game system 10 at step 312.
  • [0090]
    Using token 26 location information, the game may select a random clip from the group of clips corresponding to a skill category associated with the token space at step 314. At step 316, game system 10 displays challenge or activity 20 on television 16. If activity 20 is complete at step 318, players may enter an answer at electronic board 34 at step 320, else, if required by the question type, more information may be displayed at electronic board 34 or television 16 at step 316. The loop may continue until activity 20 is complete. Once an answer is entered, game system 10 may compute and display a score on television 16 at step 322. If the game is over at step 324, a final score may be displayed on television 16 with appropriate graphics for the winning team at step 326. If the game is not over, the game loops back to step 306 and game play continues.
  • [0091]
    In some embodiments, the game may provide one or more game moderators presented on screen to enhance the game play experience. Game moderators may have contrasting personalities. Game moderators may attempt to disrupt game flow or activity execution by players. Game moderators may randomly implement rule changes, score changes, game functionality modifications or remote device functionality changes.
  • [0092]
    Questions may be in categories with points provided correlated to question difficulty. Game strategy may involve selecting a best question category for the player's field of knowledge and how many additional points are required to win the game. The game may involve selecting from a group of displayed icons. Icons may correspond to question categories. A player may continue to answer questions and collect points until an incorrect answer is provided or a moderator directs otherwise.
  • [0093]
    Alternatively, players may compete to answer some questions before other players by indicating with remote control 18 or device 30 they have the answer. A game may include rounds. Rounds may be completed by answering all the questions in the round. Different rounds may involve variations in the number of questions, type of questions, difficulty of questions, rules, interruptions and rule changes. Different rounds may allow the players to select different categories of questions.
  • [0094]
    In another embodiment, the game may be configured to appeal to children. The game may focus on answering questions and the questions may further focus on subjects appealing to children such as animated movies or children's stories. The game may have visual aspects that appeal to children such as spinning wands to determine random numbers for game piece movement and collecting rings instead of points.
  • [0095]
    Activities for children's questions may be very simple and involve determining relationships between characters such as the Big Bad Wolf and the Three Pigs. Questions may also involve determining the missing part of a picture. For example, the picture may show the Wolf with only Two Pigs. Questions may involve identifying a character such as Snow White or Cinderella.
  • [0096]
    Alternatively, children's games may focus on an adventure and solving simple puzzles. Game questions may be part of an adventure or activity. Game questions may involve simple activities such as identifying a door of a certain color or identifying an appropriate tool for an activity. The adventure or activity may be simulated by the player.
  • [0097]
    Adventures may involve simulating an activity such as climbing a rope, swimming or horseback riding. On screen moderators may simulate the physical activity and encourage players to mimic their actions. On screen moderators may encourage players when incorrect answers are provided and maintain player's interest when no answer is supplied. During physical activities, on screen moderators may supply facts appropriate to the simulated activities such as identifying animals during mountain climbing.
  • [0098]
    The game may also involve physical activities in association with tokens or markers 26 placed on the floor. Markers 26 may be flat cutouts marked with letters, numbers, colors or symbols. The markers may be different shapes. A character on screen may engage in an activity involving stepping on different colored markers and ask the players to step on the same colored markers as the on screen character. Game play may involve competition with other players and incorrect responses may eliminate players from further competition.
  • [0099]
    These methods of game execution are examples. Different combinations of rules presented or electronic devices used can be implemented in game play and still be within the scope of this disclosure. For example, a game with multiple kinds of activities 20 may not include any board 24 or 34 or remote game devices 30. The game may be played using only DVD player 12, DVD media disk 14 and television 16. Another game with only one kind of activity 20 may include a game board 24 with no electronics. Additional or fewer steps may be involved in playing the game than those shown in this example. Display of a selected clip may include several scenes or views in sequence. For example, the selected clip may display a question, then show a picture and then display an answer.
  • [0100]
    While embodiments of a toy and methods of toy play have been particularly shown and described, many variations may be made therein. This disclosure may include one or more independent or interdependent inventions directed to various combinations of features, functions, elements and/or properties, one or more of which may be defined in the following claims. Other combinations and sub-combinations of features, functions, elements and/or properties may be claimed later in this or a related application. Such variations, whether they are directed to different combinations or directed to the same combinations, whether different, broader, narrower or equal in scope, are also regarded as included within the subject matter of the present disclosure. An appreciation of the availability or significance of claims not presently claimed may not be presently realized. Accordingly, the foregoing embodiments are illustrative, and no single feature or element, or combination thereof, is essential to all possible combinations that may be claimed in this or a later application. Each claim defines an invention disclosed in the foregoing disclosure, but any one claim does not necessarily encompass all features or combinations that may be claimed. Where the claims recite “a” or “a first” element or the equivalent thereof, such claims include one or more such elements, neither requiring nor excluding two or more such elements. Further, ordinal indicators, such as first, second or third, for identified elements are used to distinguish between the elements, and do not indicate a required or limited number of such elements, and do not indicate a particular position or order of such elements unless otherwise specifically stated.
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Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis463/9
Classification internationaleA63F9/24
Classification coopérativeA63F13/10, A63F2009/186, A63F3/0423, A63F2003/00662, A63F2300/8064, A63F13/533, A63F13/80, A63F13/95, A63F2300/206
Classification européenneA63F13/10
Événements juridiques
DateCodeÉvénementDescription
6 juin 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: MATTEL, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MACIVER, PETER;LINCOLN, JAMES;ARTUSO, DAVID;REEL/FRAME:021061/0691
Effective date: 20070226