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Numéro de publicationUS20080220751 A1
Type de publicationDemande
Numéro de demandeUS 12/108,977
Date de publication11 sept. 2008
Date de dépôt24 avr. 2008
Date de priorité18 févr. 2000
Autre référence de publicationDE10195664B3, DE10195664T0, DE10195664T1, US7283845, US7624357, US8160651, US8812057, US20050114796, US20070213099, US20080200213, US20080200214, US20080200215, US20140351757, US20140351759, WO2001061443A2, WO2001061443A3
Numéro de publication108977, 12108977, US 2008/0220751 A1, US 2008/220751 A1, US 20080220751 A1, US 20080220751A1, US 2008220751 A1, US 2008220751A1, US-A1-20080220751, US-A1-2008220751, US2008/0220751A1, US2008/220751A1, US20080220751 A1, US20080220751A1, US2008220751 A1, US2008220751A1
InventeursChristopher De Bast
Cessionnaire d'origineVtech Telecommunications Ltd.
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Mobile telephone with improved man machine interface
US 20080220751 A1
Résumé
The present invention envisages a GSM mobile telephone in which a line of icons is displayed on a display. As a user navigates through the displayed line of icons, the positions of the icons alter so that the selectable icon moves to the head of the line. This approach makes it very clear (i) which icon is selectable at any time and (ii) where that icon sits in relation to other icons at the same functional level (e.g. only first level icons will be present in one line). First level icons typically relate to the following functions: phonebook; messages; call register; counters; call diversion; telephone settings; network details; voice mail and IrDA activation.
Images(6)
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Revendications(20)
1. A mobile telephone comprising:
a display;
a navigational tool; and
a graphical user interface controlling the display based upon signals received from the navigational tool,
wherein:
the display displays a first array of selectable icons associated with a first level of selectable functions,
the navigational tool allows a user to select one of the selectable functions by nudging the navigational tool in a first direction to select one icon from the first array of selectable icons,
the function of the selected icon is identified textually on the display and the functions of the remaining selectable icons are not displayed; and
a user can navigate from the display of the first array of selectable icons to a display of a second array of selectable icons associated with a second level of selectable functions by nudging the navigational tool in a second direction that is not collinear with or parallel to the first direction.
2. The mobile telephone of claim 1, wherein the navigational tool is one of a joystick and a rocker switch.
3. The mobile telephone of claim 1, wherein the second direction is approximately orthogonal to the first direction.
4. The mobile telephone of claim 1, wherein the array of selectable icons at the first level of selectable icons is a linear array.
5. The mobile telephone of claim 1, wherein the array of selectable icons at the first level of selectable icons is a two-dimensional array.
6. The mobile telephone of claim 1, wherein the selected icon is animated upon being selected.
7. The mobile telephone of claim 1, wherein the array of selectable icons includes icons for selecting a phone book function and a messaging function.
8. The mobile telephone of claim 7, wherein the array of selectable icons further includes icons for selecting at least one of a call register function, a counter function, a call diversion function, a tools function, and a telephone settings function.
9. The mobile telephone of claim 1, wherein the graphical user interface further includes a magnification function that alters the size of the selected icon.
10. The mobile telephone of claim 9, further comprising an input device that controls both a volume of the mobile telephone and the magnification function.
11. A method for operating a mobile telephone having a display, a navigational tool, and a graphical user interface controlling the display based upon signals received from the navigational tool, the method comprising:
controlling the display using the navigational tool, the navigational tool being in communication with the graphical user interface;
displaying on the display a first array of selectable icons associated with a first level of selectable functions on the display;
receiving a selection of one of the selectable functions by a nudging of the navigational tool in a first direction selecting one of the first array of selectable icons;
identifying the function of the selected icon textually on the display and not identifying the functions of the remaining selectable icons on the display; and
navigating from the display of selectable icons to a display of a second array of selectable icons associated with a second level of selectable functions in response to receiving a nudging of the navigational tool in a second direction that is not collinear with or parallel to the first direction.
12. The method of claim 11, wherein the second direction is orthogonal to the first direction.
13. The method of claim 11, further comprising animating the selected icon.
14. The method of claim 11, wherein the first level of selectable functions includes a phone book function and a messaging function.
15. The method of claim 14, wherein the first level of selectable functions further includes at least one of a call register function, a counter function, a call diversion function, a tools function and a telephone settings function.
16. A mobile telephone comprising:
a navigational tool and a graphical user interface for controlling a display; and
a top level screen on the display showing an array of selectable icons representing a top level of selectable functions, the top level screen showing that one of the selectable icons has been selected,
wherein the function of the selected icon is identified textually on the screen and the functions of the remaining selectable icons are not identified on the screen, and
wherein a user can navigate from the top level of selectable functions by nudging the navigational tool.
17. The mobile telephone of claim 16, wherein the array of selectable icons is a two-dimensional array, and wherein the selected icon can be selected by nudging the navigational tool.
18. The mobile telephone of claim 16, wherein the top level screen shows an icon representing a phone book and wherein the icon selecting the phone book is the default selected icon on the top level screen.
19. The mobile telephone of claim 18, wherein by nudging the navigational tool, the user can navigate from the top level of selectable functions to a second array of selectable icons representing a second level of selectable functions, and wherein the second level of selectable functions below the phone book function includes a consult feature allowing a display of the phone book entries and a draft feature allowing entry of new entries.
20. The mobile telephone of claim 16, comprising means for magnifying the selected icon.
Description
  • [0001]
    This application is a divisional of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/646,356 filed Dec. 28, 2006, which is a continuation of application no, 10/203,714 filed Mar. 3, 2003, which claims the benefit of International application no. PCT/GB01/00665, filed Feb. 16, 2001.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    This invention relates to a mobile telephone and in particular to a mobile telephone with an improved man machine interface. The term ‘mobile telephone’ used in this patent specification should be expansively construed to cover any kind of mobile device with communications capabilities and includes radio telephones, smart phones, communicators, and wireless information devices. It includes devices able to communicate using not only mobile radio such as GSM or UMTS, but also any other kind of wireless communications system, such as Bluetooth.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART
  • [0003]
    One of the problems facing the designers of mobile telephone user interfaces (often called ‘man machine interfaces’ or ‘MMIs’) is how to allow the user to comprehend the internal status of the mobile telephone. For example, to select or initiate a function (e.g. to open an address book function, enter a PIN security number or to alter the ring melody) a user has to understand that the status of the telephone is such that the function can be selected or initiated. A closely related problem is how to enable a user to confidently alter the internal status of the phone. This process can be thought of as the problem of how to enable a user to confidently navigate through the feature set of the telephone. Because many quite intricate operations have to be mastered early on for most mobile telephone users (setting security codes, altering ring melodies etc.), it is particularly important to facilitate the task of navigating to and activating features in the required way.
  • [0004]
    In addition, mobile telephones offer a very wide (and ever increasing) range of functions. The design of an effective MMI which can be (a) easily navigated by novices yet is (b) flexible enough to enable a large number of functions to be included, is a very challenging task. In fact, it is widely acknowledged that few mobile telephone owners regularly use any but the most basic telephone features because current MMIs are difficult to fully understand. Hence, the technical problem of effectively enabling the user to understand the internal status of the mobile telephone has to date been inadequately addressed.
  • [0005]
    One of the reasons why many conventional MMIs are inadequate is that mobile telephones are small handheld devices which generally include small display screens. The size of display screens, even for PDA type devices, is far too small to handle a rich and effective MMI, such as the Apple Macintosh Operating System MMI. As a consequence, MMI designers have tended to use text based MMIs, even though the superiority of graphical user interfaces has long been accepted in the desktop computing environment.
  • [0006]
    Conventionally, the small display size has also meant that several hierarchies of functions have to be offered to a user: the interface can be thought of as having many layers, with the user having to first locate the correct top level function and then, within that function, progressively drill down (sometimes through 3 or more layers) to complete the required task. Hence, for example, if a user wishes to enter a new telephone number into an address book stored on the mobile phone, he has to locate a top level function, typically called ‘Address Book’. He then selects that function and is presented with a list of second level functions relevant to the ‘Address book’ top level function. These second level functions typically include options for reading the contents of the Address Book, entering a new number and password protecting access to the address book. Say the user selects the option for entering a new number; he then is presented with a third level screen display asking him to complete various fields with the contact information.
  • [0007]
    With pure text based, multi-level MMIs, it can be very difficult for users to build up an understanding of the structure of the MMI; without understanding, it is very difficult to navigate extensively.
  • [0008]
    Very recently, some manufacturers have introduced GSM mobile telephones which are beginning to move away from the text only MMI. For example, the Philips Xenium telephone can display several icons on screen: Nokia and Mitsubishi have GSM telephones which can display one icon on a screen at a time. Reference may also be made to some PC operating systems and applications, in which a contextual help system is used: when the user places the mouse arrow over an icon, folder etc. for more than a couple of seconds, a help call-out or balloon appears with an explanation of the function of the icon, folder etc.
  • [0009]
    It is particularly important that the physical device(s) used to control navigation are not only easy to operate but also that the way in which they are controlled intuitively matches up with the navigation tasks to be accomplished. Conventionally, these navigation devices are 4 separate buttons (for example, for Up, Down, Accept and Reject). A user has to carefully select the correct button. That generally means that the user has to take his eyes off the screen. In some devices, a single rocker switch will overlie 4 separate buttons. But rocker switches can also require a user to take his eyes off the screen and instead concentrate on selecting and using the navigation button correctly. That in turn makes it far harder, especially for the inexperienced user, to follow and concentrate on the MMI. Where the MMI is difficult to follow anyway (as with text based, multi-level conventional GSM telephones, for example), navigation devices which require a user to take his eyes off the screen can be difficult to use.
  • STATEMENT OF THE INVENTION
  • [0010]
    In accordance with a first aspect of the present invention, a mobile telephone comprises:
  • [0011]
    (i) computing means for storing representations of one or more icons; and a
  • [0012]
    (ii) display operable to be controlled by the computing means to display one or more icons;
  • [0013]
    characterised in that the display is operable to show an array of several icons, the arrangement of the array altering as a user navigates through the array in a manner that visually indicates that the status of the computing means is such that the function associated with a single icon can be selected or initiated.
  • [0014]
    Typically, there will be an array which is a linear array of icons. A single icon is then distinguishable from the other icons by, for example, being at a prominent position within the array, such as at one end or the middle of the array. A circular array is also a possible option. The function associated with that single icon can be readily selected or initiated using a navigation tool such as a joystick. The icon itself can be thought of as being ‘selectable’. The selectable icon may also have displayed in proximity to it a word or words describing the function of the icon to (i) give it even greater prominence and (ii) to make its function explicitly clear.
  • [0015]
    The icons in the array may be animated so that their positions on the display alter as a user navigates through them. For example, the icons in the linear array can be animated to appear to move forward along the line of the array as different icons become selectable, i.e. as the user navigates along the line.
  • [0016]
    Preferably, selecting an icon in an array causes some or all of the other icons in the array to alter in appearance and/or position. The alteration may be an animation in which the other icons appear to twist or revolve and turn into different icons. This may act as an indication that one is changing levels (e.g. from a top level function to a second level function) and aids understanding of the MMI.
  • [0017]
    The present invention envisages a GSM mobile telephone embodiment in which a line of icons is displayed on a display: one of the icons is clearly selectable by for example being at the head of the line and being the only icon with explanatory text associated with it, typically in a balloon format. As a user navigates through the displayed line of icons, the identity of the selectable icon changes; this is reflected in the positions of the icons altering so that the selectable icon moves to the head of the line. This approach makes it very clear (i) which icon is selectable at any time and (ii) where that icon sits in relation to other icons at the same functional level (e.g. only first level icons will be present in one line). First level icons typically relate to the following functions: phonebook; messages; call register; counters; call diversion; telephone settings; network details; tools; voice mail and IrDA activation.
  • [0018]
    A zoom (i.e. magnification) function is preferably also provided by which a user can cause the size of the icon and/or the word or words explaining the function of that icon displayed on the display to be altered. The zoom function may be controlled by a volume up and a volume down button.
  • [0019]
    In one embodiment, the data representing an icon is stored in memory; the same data can be used to display the icon at normal size (typically 16.times. 16 pixels) and also at one or more different sizes, such as an extended size (64.times.64). This scalability removes the need to store multiple representations in memory and therefore saves memory; instead a software algorithm alters the displayed size of the icon.
  • [0020]
    In another aspect, there is provided a mobile telephone comprising:
  • [0021]
    computing means for storing representations of one or more icons: and a
  • [0022]
    display operable to be controlled by the computing means to display one or more icons;
  • [0023]
    characterised in that the display is operable to show an array of several icons, the appearance and/or position of some or all of the icons in the array altering as a user selects an icon to visually indicate that the status of the computing means is changing.
  • [0024]
    The alteration may be an animation in which some or all of the icons appear to twist or revolve and turn into different icons.
  • [0025]
    In a final aspect, there is provided a mobile telephone in which the idle screen alternates with an alert screen, each screen appearing for a pre-determined time. This leads to the layout of the idle screen not being cluttered with any kind of alert messages: conventionally, an alert message will be included together with the idle screen (e.g. ‘1 missed call’; ‘You have a SMS’), but that clutters the screen and can obscure important branding information. In the present embodiment, the idle screen is shown for 5 seconds, and then an alert screen for 5 seconds if there are any alerts. The screens alternate until the user reads or reviews the alert screen in some way. Accessing the alert screen can take the user directly to the menu(s) which allow the user to respond to the alert. Hence, if the alert is that a SMS message has come in, once the user has seen that alert screen, is he offered a direct route into reading the message and/or responding to the message.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0026]
    The invention will be further described with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:
  • [0027]
    FIG. 1 is a plan view of a mobile telephone in accordance with the present invention;
  • [0028]
    FIG. 2 is a side view of a mobile telephone in accordance with the present invention;
  • [0029]
    FIG. 3 is a plan view of the possible movement which a joystick may make;
  • [0030]
    FIG. 4 is a screen shot showing a top level screen;
  • [0031]
    FIG. 5 is a screen shot showing the top level screen displayed when a user navigates down one step through the top level screen functions shown in FIG. 4;
  • [0032]
    FIG. 6 is a screen shot showing the second level screen displayed when a user navigates one step deeper into the Phone Book function shown as selected in FIG. 4;
  • [0033]
    FIG. 7 is a screen shot showing the second level screen displayed when a user navigates down one step through the second level screen functions shown in FIG. 6 (i.e. down through the Phone Book functions);
  • [0034]
    FIG. 8 is a screen shot showing the second level screen displayed when a user navigates down one further step through the second level Phone Book functions shown in FIG. 7;
  • [0035]
    FIG. 9 is a screen shot showing the second level screen displayed when a user navigates up one step through the second level Phone Book functions shown in FIG. 8;
  • [0036]
    FIG. 10 is a schematic showing the effect of zooming on icon size;
  • [0037]
    FIG. 11 is a schematic showing the effect of zooming on menu text size;
  • [0038]
    FIG. 12 is a schematic showing the effect of zooming on message text size;
  • [0039]
    FIG. 13 is a screen shot showing how the idle screen alternates with the alert screen.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0040]
    Referring now to FIG. 1, a GSM mobile telephone is shown generally at 1. It includes the conventional features of a display 2, a start call button 4, an end call button 3 and numeric keys indicated generally at 6. Start call button 4 is commonly labelled with a green telephone handset shown off-hook or marked with the word ‘SEND’. End call button 3 is commonly labelled with a red telephone handset shown on-hook or marked with the word ‘END’. In addition, it also includes a joystick 5, which can be more clearly seen in FIG. 2 as comprising a short cylindrical member up standing from the front face of the telephone 1. As shown in FIG. 3, the joystick can be readily pushed by a user in one of 4 different directions. Joysticks of this kind are available from ITT Canon (ref. TPA 413G).
  • [0041]
    The MMI allows fast, intuitive navigation to take place. That is best appreciated from FIGS. 4 to 9. FIG. 4 is a screen shot showing a top level screen; the Phone Book icon is readily understood by a user to have been reached since it is (a) at the top of its line, (b) is coupled with the cartoon style call out including the explanatory text ‘Phone Book’ and (c) no other icons include explanatory text. Hence the user is informed that the internal status of the telephone is such that Phone Book functions can be selected. (From a theoretical perspective, the mobile telephone can be though of as a state machine; effectively representing the actual state to a user and enabling the user to alter the condition of the state machine is the task of the MMI).
  • [0042]
    In FIG. 4, the next icon down the line is a telephone with an arrow. This represents the ‘Diversion’ function. To reach the Diversion function, the user nudges the joystick down. FIG. 5 shows the result: the Diversion function is shown at the top of the line, accompanied by a call out balloon stating ‘Diversion’. Coupling the downwards nudge of the joystick with moving downwards through a line of icons makes navigation easily understood and readily achieved without any need for the user to takes his eyes off the display.
  • [0043]
    Returning to FIG. 1, the Phone Book function can be selected by simply nudging the joystick to the right; this takes the user to the Phone Book related features depicted in FIG. 6—a second level set of functions/features. The user is going deeper into the levels now, so that a nudge to the right is a natural way of expressing this movement. Each of the four top level icons appear to twist around through 180 degrees when the joystick is nudged to the right. Four icons appear to continue twisting around, but these are now icons of the second level functions related to the Phone Book function. These 4 new icons appear to rotate through 180 degrees to yield the FIG. 6 display.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 6 shows that the ‘Consult’ feature has been reached since the associated icon plus call out is at the top of the line. The ‘Consult’ feature can be selected simply by nudging the joystick to the right again. A phone book would then be displayed. If a different Phone Book feature is needed, then the user has to navigate down the list of second level Phone Book icons. One nudge down of the joystick takes the user to the display shown in FIG. 7: the feature ‘Draft’ has now moved to the top of the line and is accompanied by the call out ‘Draft’. This icon) plus the other icons further down, appear to move up the line. The ‘Draft’ function can be readily selected with a nudge to the right. A further nudge down however takes the user down the line of Phone Book features to yield the FIG. 8 display, in which the ‘Own number’ feature has been reached. Moving up through the second level Phone book features is achieved through nudging the joystick up, as shown in FIG. 9. Returning to the top level screen (i.e. as depicted in FIG. 4) is achieved through nudging the joystick to the left.
  • [0045]
    Appendix 1 shows a more comprehensive list of the icons and/or words displayed on the display 2 for different levels. It therefore lists the features and functions which can be navigated to and from using the joystick. As explained above, a nudge to the right takes one down into a deeper level of the system (e.g. across a row from top to second level). The higher level icons twist around to reveal the icons of the lower level functions. Nudging left takes one up a level (e.g. across a row from third level to second level). The lower level icons twist around to reveal the icons of the higher level functions. Nudging down takes one down through the items at the same level (down a column) that are associated with the same immediately higher level function. The icons in the line appear to move upwards. Nudging up takes one up through the items at the same level (up a column) that are associated with the same immediately higher level function. The icons in the line appears to move downwards.
  • [0046]
    A zoom function is also provided by which a user can cause the size of the icon and/or the word or words explaining the function of that icon displayed on the display to be altered. The zoom function is controlled by a volume up (FIG. 1, at 7) and a volume down button (FIG. 1, at 8). The user can zoom in and out as shown in FIG. 10; in addition the user can select that the word or words explaining the function of one or more icons is/are not displayed (FIG. 10, bottom right). This gives an uncluttered look to the display, which can be more appealing to a more experienced user. Also, it liberates screen space for more icons, which again can be appealing to more experienced users. Another earlier use of the volume controls to control a zoom function may be useful even where icons are not associated with any kind of explanatory text at all and such an embodiment is within the scope of a further aspect of the invention.
  • [0047]
    FIG. 10 also shows how icons can be made to overlap, thereby allowing more icons to fit onto a display without destroying legibility. This purely text based implementation is illustrated at FIG. 11 for menu navigation. Zooming is also very useful when reading, text, such as in a SMS message. This is shown in FIG. 12.
  • [0048]
    Again, the use of the volume controls for zooming is intuitive, removes the need for additional zoom-specific keys and therefore saves cost and reduces the apparent complexity of the telephone. Arranging for the zoom In and zoom Out functions to be controlled by the volume keys is also attractive since it enables a user to perform a zoom at any stage in the navigation process (except during a call or in idle, where speaker and ringer are respectively managed by these keys). This is particularly helpful in enabling an inexperienced user to experiment with and therefore learn the structure of the navigation system.
  • [0049]
    The zoom function may alter in dependence on the selected mode or function of the mobile telephone to give one or more zoom settings optimised for the selected mode or function. For example, when editing text the zoom can magnify an amount that is most relevant to seeing text clearly (and multiple zoom settings can be provided and accessed through multiple nudges of the zoom button). A different zoom amount may be appropriate for zooming into the normal icon based menus, and another for zooming into text only menus. The zoom function works particularly well with the mobile telephone of the first aspect of the present invention.
  • [0050]
    The data representing an icon is stored in memory; the same data can be used to display the icon at normal size (typically 16.times. 16 pixels) and also at one or more different sizes, such as an extended size (64.times.64) using a software algorithm. This scalability removes the need to store multiple representations in memory, which is a valuable resource.
  • [0051]
    FIG. 13 shows the idle screen: the idle screen alternates with an alert screen, such as a Missed SMS screen, or a Voice Mail screen or a Missed Call Alert. This leads to the layout of the idle screen not being cluttered with any kind of alert messages: conventionally, an alert message will be included together with the idle screen (e.g. 1 missed call’; ‘You have a SMS’), but that clutters the screen and can obscure important branding information. In the present embodiment, the idle screen is shown for 5 seconds, and then an alert screen for 5 seconds if there are any alerts, as illustrated in FIG. 13. The screens alternate until the user reads or reviews the alert screen by pressing OK on the joystick. The phone will then display a static alert screen with one icon for every pending event (missed call, received SMS, . . . ). In FIG. 13, the alert screen shows the Missed Call icon. This can be accompanied with the words “Missed Call’.
  • [0052]
    Accessing the alert screen can take the user directly to the menu(s) which allow the user to respond to the alert. Hence, if the alert is that a SMS message has come in, once the user has seen that alert screen, is he offered a direct route into reading the message and/or responding to the message.
  • [0000]
    APPENDIX 1
    Second level
    functions Third level functions Fourth level functions
    Top level (all icons are task (Words only, unless (Words only, unless
    functions specific) otherwise stated) otherwise stated)
    Phone Book Icon + word Open up address book
    Icon + words ‘Consult’
    ‘Phone Book”
    Icon + word ‘Draft’ Enter Name
    Icon + word ‘Own Display Own Number
    Number’
    Icon + word Display storage info
    ‘Capacity’
    Icon + word Enter restriction PIN
    ‘Restrict’
    Icon + word Enter your business
    ‘Business Card’ card details
    Message Icon + Icon + word ‘Write Create New Write Message
    word “Messages’ Message’
    User pre-defined Select a pre-defined
    message
    Icon + words ‘In List in-coming
    Box’ messages
    Icon + words ‘Out List outgoing messages
    Box’
    Icon + words Displays storage info
    Capacity
    Icon + word Service Center Message Center Number
    ‘Settings’
    Validity Period Select validity period
    option
    Message type Select message type (e.g.,
    fax, email, x400,standard
    text, telex
    Delivery Report Select ‘on’ or ‘off’ options
    Reply via same Select ‘on’ or ‘off’ options
    Melody Select Melody option
    Icon + words ‘Cell Receive CB Select cell broadcast ‘on’
    Broadcast’ or ‘off’
    Call Register Icon + words ‘Missed Lists missed calls
    Icon+ words Calls’
    “Call Register’
    Icon + words Lists received calls
    ‘Received calls’
    Icon + words ‘Dialled Lists dialed calls Send message to; Call
    calls’ number; Forward calls to;
    Save number; Options to
    select; then takes you to
    appropriate screen
    Icon + words ‘Delete’ Lists Missed calls,
    Received calls, Dialled
    Calls, All calls
    Counters Icon + Icon + word ‘Time’ Last call; all calls out; Display time count data
    word ‘Counters’ all calls in; Clear timers
    Divert Icon + Unconditional; all Activate; de-activate Voice, fax, data all options
    word ‘Divert’ unanswered; if busy, and status check to select, then takes you to
    if no reply; if not phone book to select
    reachable number to receive
    diversions
    Settings icon + Icon + word List of various
    word ‘Settings’ ‘Language’ language options to
    select
    Icon + words ‘Alert Icon + words All cases; number stored;
    tones’ ‘Melodies’ Number not stored;
    messages; Alarm to be
    selected; then gives lists of
    melodies to select
    Icon + words ‘Key On, Off and DTMF tones
    Tones’ to be selected
    Icon + words ‘Deep On or off to be selected
    Silent’
    Icon + words ‘Ringer 3 ranges to be selected
    Volume’
    Icon + words ‘Auto On or off to be selected
    key lock’
    Icon + word Change PIN and Enter PIN required
    ‘Security’ Disable PIN options
    Icon + word ‘Time & Displays time and Date Alter time and date
    Date’
    Icon + word ‘Auto- On of off to be selected
    answer’
    Icon + word ‘Hot Lists hot keys
    keys’
    Icon + word Select 1-3 contrast
    ‘Contrast’ scale
    Network Icon + Icon + word barring Select outgoing, incoming,
    word ‘Network’ ‘Services’ barring password
    Call waiting Activate, de-activate,
    status check
    Identification See call ID; call incognito;
    see connected ID; connect
    incognito; status check
    Auto-redial On or off to be selected
    Change network
    Preferred networks Lists preferred
    networks
    Registration mode Lists automatic,
    manual, force network
    Demonstration Give a demo of the
    Icon + word phone
    “Demonstration’
    Tools Icon +
    word ‘Tools’
    IrDA Icon +
    words ‘IrDA
    Activation’
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Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis455/414.2, 715/781, 715/727, 715/835
Classification internationaleG06F3/0482, G06F3/0338, H04M3/493, H04M1/725, H04M1/247
Classification coopérativeH04M1/72583, G06F3/04817, G06F3/0338, G06F3/04842, G06F3/0482, H04M1/72522, H04M1/72547, G06T13/80
Classification européenneG06F3/0338, G06F3/0482, H04M1/725F1, H04M1/725F4
Événements juridiques
DateCodeÉvénementDescription
9 juil. 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: VTECH MOBILE, LTD., UNITED KINGDOM
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:DEBAST, CHRISTOPHE;REEL/FRAME:022934/0400
Effective date: 20010302
Owner name: DONOVAN DEVELOPMENTS LIMITED, VIRGIN ISLANDS, BRIT
Free format text: PURCHASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:VTECH MOBILE, LTD.;REEL/FRAME:022928/0660
Effective date: 20020311
Owner name: DONOVAN DEVELOPMENTS LIMITED, VIRGIN ISLANDS, BRIT
Free format text: NUNC PRO TUNC ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:VTECH MOBILE, LTD.;REEL/FRAME:022928/0656
Effective date: 20030815
21 juil. 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: VTECH TELECOMMUNICATIONS LIMITED, HONG KONG
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:DONOVAN DEVELOPMENTS LIMITED;REEL/FRAME:022973/0841
Effective date: 20090717
13 déc. 2010ASAssignment
Owner name: MOTOROLA MOBILITY, INC, ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MOTOROLA, INC;REEL/FRAME:025673/0558
Effective date: 20100731
12 mai 2011ASAssignment
Owner name: MOTOROLA, INC., ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:VTECH TELECOMMUNICATIONS LIMITED;REEL/FRAME:026265/0665
Effective date: 20100105