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Numéro de publicationUS2144637 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication24 janv. 1939
Date de dépôt22 janv. 1935
Date de priorité22 janv. 1935
Numéro de publicationUS 2144637 A, US 2144637A, US-A-2144637, US2144637 A, US2144637A
InventeursHoward Smith F, Pugh Addie A
Cessionnaire d'originePugh Addie A
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Hot metal car
US 2144637 A
Résumé  disponible en
Images(4)
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Revendications  disponible en
Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

J. D. PUGH HOT METAL CAR Jan. 24, 1939.

Filed Jan. 22, 1935 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 @w #ggf @M4 NNN@ MN wk JanT 24, 1939. J. D, pUGH 2,144,637

HOT METAL CAR Filed Jan. 22, 1935 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Jan. 24, 1 D; PUGH HOT METAL CAR Filed Jan. 22, 1935 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Jan. 24, 1939. J, D. PUSH 2,144,637

HOT METAL CAR Filed Jan. 22, 1935 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 l;

Patented Jan. 24,y 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE HOT METAL CAR Pugh, Baltimore, Md.

Application January 22, 1935, Serial No. 2,955

17 Claims.

'Ihis invention relates to mobile containers for molten materials, generally designated hot metal cars and to methods of operating the same in the transportation and distribution of such materials.

The present application is acontinuation in part of my copending application Serial No. 722,555, led April 26, 1934.

Mobile containers of this general type which v are used for the transportation of molten material such as iron and steel from the point of origin in the steel plant to various points of destination, are well known in the art. These containers are mounted upon car structures for transportation along suitable trackways and are 'heavily insulated so thatthe material will remain in a molten state for long periods of time and be uid when the car reaches its destination or discharge point.v O-ne form of hot metal car of this type which has proved highly useful One. object of the invention is the provision of a hot metal car which has a. maximum capacity for a given weight, height and length. It is desirable, of course, to provide means for the transportation of large volumes of molten materials in a single batch. but without realizing excessive wheel loads upon the track Iand also without requiring a car of such length or height as to give rise to diculties in rounding curves or clearing the usual overhead structures` encountered on either standard railway or plant lines.

The hot metal cars of larger capacity give superior operating efficiencies over the smaller cars on account of the reduced unit radiating A surface and the increased heat conservation;

these thermal advantages permitting the delivery of hotter metal and a more fluid slag, re-

sulting in the maintenance of cleaner ladles and 55 as in the present case the lower unit cost of the (Cl. 10S-270) larger size of ladle rather enhances the operating advantages. These advantages are attained in the present case by the novel car structure in which the ladle is mounted directly on the trucks themselves Without the interposition of 5 car framing of any kind. In accordance with this invention, and for the purpose of permitting the container proper, which has the shape of a form of revolution with a horizontal axis, to have the largest possible diameter, the usual car unl0 der frame and end frames are dispensed with and the container itself is mounted directly upon Wheel supporting trucks.v This construction permits the maximum cross sectional area for any predetermined height limit of the container and 15 supporting means. The novel hot metal car constructed in accordance with the present invention carries no dumping mechanism such as in previous cars of this type, the metal being withdrawn from the container by either of the 20 two optional methods which will 'be later described, therebeing a great resulting saving in weight by reason of the omission of the heavy motor, gearingvand framing usually employed in self-dumping cars. 25

contents of the container, one of said means being described and claimed in my copending application to which reference has been made; 30 that means permitting the discharge of the entire contents of the container without necessitating the tilting of the container body itself and without the provision of any special dumping mechanism associated therewith. I'his mecha- 35 nism as pointed out in the priorv application, comprises essentially a sealing cover for a port formed in the wall of the container ator near its top, a discharge tube preferably carried by the cover, and means for introducing compressed 40 air or gas into the container above the level of the molten materials therein, the purpose being to eect the discharge of molten materials through the discharge tube under the complete control of the operator'. The sealing cover, dis- 45 charge tube and means for compressing gas are not carried by the car itself but positioned at the point of disposal or discharge so that such mechanisms add no weight or bulk to the car when it is in transit.

The second method .of discharge may be applied to the unloading of either the entire contents of the container or of any portion thereof as, for example, the residue of slag remaining after the discharge of molten iron by the method Y above described. This method also provides for the inversion and cleaning of the container when necessary. The connection of the container with its supporting trucks is so designed in accordance with the present invention as to prevent relative bodily movement in a horizontal plane but to permit the lifting of the container from the trucks for the purposes of this second dumping method. The novel disposition of these parts permits the ready return of the container to its normal position after dumping.

In the various embodiments of the present invention illustrated and described in the present specification the hot metal car is moved to a point on its trackway until it is positioned directly opposite certain fulcrums or skids supported closely adjacent the track. In some cases the skids or fulcrums are moved toward the container for engagement therewith, and in others the exterior unloading means is mounted in a stationary position and adapted to be engaged by certain cooperating means on the container. When such Contact is made between the con# tainer and the tilting means, the container is lifted by means of a cable depending from an overhead crane, along a curved path about an axis passing between the points'of contact of the supplemental unloading means'and the cooperating portions of the container until it entirely clears the trucks and'may be thereafter rotated or rolled upon the unloading means until the port lin the body of the container, which is normally positioned uppermost, becomes lowermost. Any molten material or other substance which may be in the container is, of course, discharged when such inversion takes place and furthermore it is then possible to examine the container interiorly to ascertain the condition of the lining or for other purposes.

Closely involved with these features is the peculiar and noval construction of the supporting trucks and this becomes an important object of the invention. In the illustrated embodiment there are provided truck holsters of novel form which are particularly adapted for supporting the container for tilting or rotation, and for transmitting the draft forces of the train.

Other objects and features of novelty will be apparent from the following description when read in connection with the accompanying drawings in which certain forms of my invention are `illustrated by way of example.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of a hot metal car embodying the principles of my invention, with a portion thereofcut away to disclose certain features of the supporting trucks;

Figure 2 is a side elevation of the hot metal car, certain portions being cut away to better illustrate the truck construction and container supporting means;

Figure 3 is an end view of the car and associated unloading mechanism;

Figure 4 is a transverse vertical sectional view through a portion of the container and truck and showing the king pin and side bearing construction;

Figure 5 is a detail sectional view taken on line 5--5 of Figure v4; 1

Figure 6 is a similar detail sectional view taken through the corresponding side bearing at the other end o! the container;

Figure 'I is a fragmentary sectional view similartofFlgure 4 but illustrating a modification of the king pin bearing means;

Figure 8 is an end view of a hot metal car and unloading mechanism illustrating another embodiment of the invention;

Figure 9 is a similar view illustrating a further embodiment in which the container is rolled along stationary unloading means;

Figure 10 is a view in side elevation of another form of hot metal car of less capacity than those illustrated in the earlier iigures;

Figure 11 is an end View of the same car illustrating one unloading method;

Figure 12 is a fragmentary view in side elevation of one end of the truck and bolster support.- ing this car;

Figure 13 is a transverse vertical sectional view through the king pin and side bearings of the light weight car; and

Figure 14 is a plan view of one of the bolsters employed in this latter embodiment.

In the exemplary disclosures of the-present invention, there are illustrated and described hot metal cars of two capacities: one of a rating of 200 tons, being illustrated in Figures 1-9 inclusive; and the other of a 75 ton capacity which is shown in the remaining figures of drawings.

The larger of these cars will be described ilrst. In the pertinent figures of the drawings the container itself, designated generally by the reference numeral I0, has the shape of a form of revolution with a horizontal axis, and while it may vary in its adaptations, it may be conveniently formed with a central cylindrical portion II and two outwardly tapering frusto-conical portions I2 which terminate in the end casting I5. The container is lined with suitable well-known insulating material indicated at I6 in Figure 4 and is provided with spouts I1 having ports I8 through which the metal is adapted to be poured or otherwise removed as will be hereinafter described in detail.

The ladle or container III is mounted directly upon the trucks without the interposition of any car framing or platform. Each of the trucks 20 may be provided with ten wheels as shown and may comprise a properly equalized and balanced combination of a six wheel truck 2| and a four wheel truck 22. The six wheel truck is provided with an H-shaped bolster 23 having an intermediate portion 24 and four lateral projections 25 comprising spring seats for connection with the side frames of the six wheel truck. The four wheel truck 22 is provided withI an ordinary transverse bolster 21. The bolster 21 is provided at its ends with side bearings indicated at 28 and the large bolster 23 is provided with the side bearings 29. These bolsters are also provided respectively with center bearings 30 and 3I. Supported upon these side and center bearings is the superbolster which is shown partly in solid and partly in dotted lines in Figure 1, and very clearly in side elevation in Figure 2 of the drawings. This superbolster is provided with pins whichl enter the center bearings 30 and 3I and with corresponding side bearing portions disposed above the side bearings 28 and 29 and having rollers or other anti-friction means 36 interposed therebesuperbolster 35 is designed to receive suitable draft mechanism with which is associated the 'formed thev rounded 'king pins'46.

the time that the ladle is removed for dumping purposes. The exibility permits the free-articulation of the trucks on curved tracks and the spacers are not intended to sustain any of the load applied to the'draft gear since this is transmitted through the body of the ladle itself.

The frusto-conical portions I2 of the ladle are provided with saddles 45 centrally of which are It will be obvious to one skilled in the art to which this invention relates, that the saddles 45 which are of lrelatively small dimensions may be formed as 4an integral part of the wall of the container or one end of the car, are normally spaced slightly from the upper side bearing parts 41. This spacing or clearance between the side bearing portions on the saddle 45 and the roller bearings 50 is omitted at the opposite end of the car.' This feature is illustrated in Figures 5 and 6 of the drawings. This affords a substantially threepoint suspension of the ladle on the two car trucks and permits a certain flexibility or tilting of the relatively elongated car when rounding banked turns. This arrangement, it will be understood. is only necessary in the case of exceptionally long cars of great carrying capacity. The three points of suspension referred to are, of course, the king pin at the end of the car at which the wider spacing of the side bearings occurs and the two side bearings at the opposite end of the car.

The method of discharging the molten contents of the car by means of pneumatic pressure is quite similar to that described in my copending application to which reference has already been made and will only be briey referred to herein. The assembly which is adapted to be lowered in place upon the ladle; as by means of a crane stationed at the point of discharge, is indicated generally by the reference character 55. This assembly comprises the two cover plates`58 which are adapted 'to t tightly over the ports I8 and are connected by the yoke 51. Renewable seats 56' are applied to the spout ports in order to render the covers air-tight and self-sealing. These seats are preferablymade of a non-ferrous metal to which no molten metal will adhere and which may be readily cleaned. By means of suitable counterweighted lost motion connections between the cover and the latch means indicated at 58, the 'cover arrangement is locked securely into place upon the spouts. The counterweight in this case is shown at 59. These features are described in detail in my copending application'.

One of the covers 56 isprovided with a discharge tube 6U which extends nearly to the boti tom of the container and may be of any height` terminating at its upper end in the laterally directed spout 5I. The crane hack for raising and lowering the pneumatic discharge mechanism is indicated at 62. In the operation of this di."- charge means, compressed vair is introduced into the interior of the ladle preferably through the opposite cover 56 which, of course. is provided `with an air hose or pipe coupling. Suitable check valves and air jets such as described in the applcation referred to are provided for controlling the pressures and venting gases from the ladle. The discharge tube 60, 6I is provided at its upper end with an expansion chamber 65 which carries a.

hood 66 and is for the purpose of arresting any sparks or bubbles of molten iron which may be discharged at this point. With the covers clamped in position and the compressed air turned on, the molten metal will be forced out of the ladle and through the lower end of the discharge tube, thence upwardly through the tube and out at the spout 6I. Since the lower end of the tube extends to a point near the bottom of the interior of the ladle the pure metal will be discharged kiirst and the slag which floats thereon will be discharged last; or, if desired, the slag may be retained for subsequent disposalv at another point. Interruption of the discharge of molten material may be obtained by cutting off the air supply by a suitable controlling valve, and the pneumatic discharge device 55 may be removed by raising the crane hook 62 which will immediately unclamp the weighted latches orhooks 58 and permit the continued lifting of the hook 62, removing the entire device from the car.

The alternative method of unloading which involves rotatably removing` the -ladle from the car trucks will now be described. As depicted in Figures 1, 2 and 3 of the drawings there may be disposed alongside the track at the proper point a bifurcated runner 18 which is adapted to receive the molten material from the car and discharge it into the transfer ladles 12. Upon either side of the runner 1li are installed the spaced stands 15 which are located at the same distance apart as the ends I5 of the transporting ladle I0 of the hot metal car. These stands are provided. 'with the fulcrum members 11 which project toward the track upon which the car is adapted to travel; and the stand is also provided at its upper vportion with the toothed rack 18. One of the end castings I5 of the container is clearly' shown in Figure 3 of the drawings. Upon the upper half or more of their peripheries they are provided with the toothed `sectors and pro- `jecting downwardly and outwardly from their lower portions are the legs BI which are provided with concave seats 82. As the hot metal car approaches the delivery station the substantially cylindrical fulcrum projections 11 pass into the concavities 82 of the legs 8| and at this point the car is brought to a standstill. The members 11 are preferably provided with tapered and pointed projectile-like noses in order to be guided accurately into engagement with the leg portions 82. In order to rotate the ladle to dumping position the hooks 84, which are adapted to be raised by a suitable crane at the deliverystation, are made to engage the lugs 85 which project from the cylindrical portion II of the ladle as shown clearly both in Figures 2 and 3 of the drawings. As the ladle is lifted by an elevation of the hooks 84, the container is rotated about the fulcrum 11 as a center and the toothed segments 88 are brought to mesh with the racks 18 on the stands now be described. Thel king pins 46 which are received within the center bearings or sockets 48 of the car trucks are constructed, as clearly illustrated, with the lower portions thereof of less diameter than the upper, the king pins assuming an inverted dome shape which may be nearly hemispherical as shown in Figure 4 of the drawings or may be conical or of a similar downward tapering configuration. This arrangement permits the ready tilting or rotation of the car about an exterior fulcrum without interference of the king pin with its bearing or any other portion of the supporting trucks. As already indicated, the shape of each of the king pins may be hemispherical,. conical or of any other down- -wardly converging conilguration. The limitation of the profile of the king pins may be expressed as follows: All points on the surface of the pin remote from the fulcrum point shall lie within a circle drawn through the uppermost point of contact of said surface with the bearing socket about the fulcrum point as a center. The radius and arcs of this circle are indicated in certain of the figures of drawings at R. When the container is rocked about the axis represented by the fulcrums 11, the king pins, upon being lifted, will be freely drawn out of their recesses in the truck bolster and during the final lowering movement will freely enter the recesses; yet there is close engagement of the king pin surfaces with the correspondingly curved surfaces of the king pin re'- ceiving recesses at the center bearing of the bolster. The king pins are symmetrically formed in order that the container may be rocked in either direction from the trucks when being inverted.

An alternative form of center bearing for the superbolster 35 is suggested in Figure '7 of the drawings. A socket portion 81 is formed in the bolster and ball bearings 88 are retained therein by means of the annular ring 89 which also centers the king pin and receives horizontal loads from the draft gear and other sources.

In Figure 8, an unloading station is provided which employs extensible and retractible racks for engagement with toothed rings or segments on the car. A pair of these racks is provided as at and each of these racks has toothed portions 9| which may be downwardly curved as at 92 at their forward ends. The unloading racks are adapted to mesh with the annular toothed rings provided at the ends I5 of the ladies shown in Figure 8. The racks are supported for substantially horizontal movement upon the rollers 96 and 91, the horizontal flange 98 being provided at the rear end of each of the racks and being v retained and guided by the small superposed roller 99., The forward ends of the racks vare provided with undersurfaces which are inclined gradually as at |00 and more abruptly as at |0|. The projection and retraction of the racks may be accomplish@ by any suitable driving means (not shown) which is made to actuate the screw |04 which transmits the force to the racks by means of the slide block |05 inthe linkage |06. A portion of the stationary stand for supporting this operating mechanism is indicated at |01. The dotted line position of the rack shown in Figure 8 represents the retracted position thereof wherein the forward end is supported by the roller 91 contacting the inclined lower edge |00. As the racks are projected toward the hot metal car, which is brought to rest at the proper points along the tracks adjacent the unloading station, they are moved upwardly toward the toothed rings 95 of the container, gradually at first as thel portion |00 moves along the roller and more abruptly as` the portion |0| rides upon the roller so that the teeth of the rack 9| are brought into proper engagement with those of the ring 95. By means of the hook |09 which engages the proper connections H0 on the remote side of the container, the container may be rolled upon the racks until it is completely inverted as indicated in the dotted line position This tilting and rolling movement is permitted by the similar downwardly tapering conformation of theking pin ||2, the center of curvature of the profile of which is substantially at the points of initial meshing contact of the racks and toothed segments.

In Figure 9 there is shown an unloading arrangement in which the unloading racks are stationary and the portion of the track H5 adjacent the unloading station is movable laterally as by means of the supports IIB. These racks are indicated at I1 and are shown mounted upon the stationary pedestals H8. The forward faces 9 of the racks are provided with teeth which face .toward the container and are adapted to be engaged by the teeth 95 formed on the end discs I5 of the car when the track sections I|5 are moved laterally toward the unloading station.

' The ladle is then rotated by means of the crane hoists already described until it is brought to its 1Inverted position as indicated in the description of the preceding embodiments.

As adapted to ladies or cars of smaller capacities, the invention is illustrated in the embodi-v ment shown in Figures 10-14 of the drawings. This example is that of a 75 ton ladle which is also directly mounted upon the car trucks, thus affording the proportionate economies and reduction in weight as already described in connection with the 200 ton car. In this disclosure, the ladle indicated generally by the reference character |25 is of the same .general configuration as the larger ladle, having an intermediate cylindrical portion |26 and end portions |21 of substantially frusto-conical shape. The end caps or castings |29 are provided with trunnions |30 for the attachment of crane hooks under certain circumstances and at their lowermost points are formed with the tapering king pins |32.

This smaller car is adapted to be mounted upon two four-'wheel trucks |35 disposed at the ends thereof. Substantially T-shaped bolsters |38, shown to best advantage in the plan view of Figure 14 of the drawings, are mounted upon the springs |31 by means of the spring seat portions |38. The transverse portions of the bolster members |36 are provided with center bearing members |40 which are designed to receive the tapered king pins |32 of the ladle and the4 side bearing tracks |42 which receive the barrel shaped roller side bearings |45. The end castings |29 of the ladle are provided with `the laterally extending braced bearing portions |41 which rest upon the side bearing rollers |45 and are curved in substantial conformation to the peripheries of these rollers for a purpose to be hereinafter explained. The longitudinal portions |49 of the bolster members |36 are adapted to contain suitable draft gearing just as in the previously described embodiment and the couplers |50 Iare suitably connected thereto. Y

The two trucks |35 are adaptedr to be properly spaced apart, during the absence -of the ladle from its transporting position, by means of the tie rod |52 which is adjustable in length as by means of the turnbuckle |53. The warping of the car due to unevenness of track levels as in rounding banked turns is sufficiently permitted in a car ofthis length by means of the bolster supporting springs |31, and further means such as the described three-point suspension ofthe 200 ton car is not necessary in this instance.

The forward end |49 of the bolster |36 containing the draft gear may be given additional supporting means by the coiled springs |55 which lie beneath the flanges |56 and rest uponthe cross bar |51 suitably secured to the ends of the trucks |35 as at |58.

Of course, pneumatic discharge apparatus may be employed in connection with this car similar to/that described in case of the embodiment of l larger capacity.

The dumping arrangement in this case, however, diiers in some particulars from that of the larger car. The intermediateportion |26 of the ladle is provided with the :two ears |60 which are provided with the cylindricalgbearing portions |6|. Downwardly projecting ears or lugs |63 are also provided at thlower part of the intermediate portion |26 for the engagementof the hook of a dumping crane. Upon elevation of the crane hook applied to the projection 163 *the ladle is rotated about the side bearing roller |45 upon the opposite side of the car to that upon which the engaged lug |63 is disposed. The side bearing members |41 on the ladle -,roll upon the curved surfaces of the roller |45 as the ladle rotates and the tapered king pin |32 moves out of its center bearing |40 clearing the walls thereof on account of the particular design of the king 4 pin described herein. It will be noted that the Walls of the king pin may be either curved or inclined just so that the lowermost portion of the side remote from the initial fulcrum point describes an arc which does not intersect any portion of the supporting bearing. The tilting of the ladle through a few degrees will bring the lugs or ears |60 into operative contact with the bearings |65 carried by the stands |66 mounted at the side of the track. This connection |60, |65 then becomes the fulcrum of the rotating ladle and further movement brings the ladle to the position |68 shown in dotted lines in Figure 11 of the drawings. It will thus be seen that during a short initial portion of the dumping movement of the ladle in this embodiment, the side bearings |45 form the fulcrum and during the latter portion of the dumping movement the fulcrum point is transferred to the bearing |65 on the stationary dumping stand.

Comparisons between the hot metal cars constructed in accordance with the present invention and others designed to perform similar functions make it very apparent that the present type of car is a most economical one to construct, operate and maintain.`1t has been found that, as compared with hot metal cars which carry power dumping means for instance, there is a most substantial saving in weight for al1 capacities and sizes ofcars and that the actual saving in weight increases with increase in carrying capacity. Thus a typical car constructed in accordance with the present invention, having a capacity of 75 tons, may be designed to weigh as low .as about 900 pounds for each ton of carrying capacity, and the same type of car designed to carry 200 tons of molten material may Weigh only about 800 pounds for each ton of carrying capacity. The reverse is true with respect to cars of the motor dump type, for instance, one of these cars having a capacityof '15l tons weighing approximately 1260 pounds per ton of carrying capacity (as compared with 900 pounds) and a car having 200 tons "capacity weighing about 1450 pounds for each ton of carrying capacity or, in other words, increasing in weight at a faster rate than increasing in capacity. The saving in first cost and cost of operation and maintenance is obvious.

It will be seen that, in its broader aspects, the present invention is applicable to all of the illustrated and merely exemplary embodiments as well as to many other variations which may be proposed, and, in any event, is only to be construed as limited in its scope by the following claims.

Having. `thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

l. A car'for the transportation of hot metal or the like comprising a container and a mobile support therefor, the support including wheeled trucks having recesses, respectively, for the reception of king pins, a container normally resting on said trucks and having king pins rigid therewith, each of which projects within one of said recesses, the trucks being revoluble about the vertical axes of the king pins, and the king pins and recesses being so shaped as to permit ready removal of the container from the support by an upward rocking movement along a curved path about an axis located at one side of the container.

2. A hot metal car or the like comprising a pair of wheeled trucks, a container provided adjacent the ends thereof with king pins received within cooperating sockets in said respective trucks, side bearings between said container and said trucks which together with said king pins comprise` the sole means of connection between said container and said trucks, said king pins being of some downwardly tapered coniiguration at least in a transverse plane whereby said container may be readily tilted or rotated about a fulcrum disposed laterally of said king pins for dumping purposes.

3. A hot metal car or the like comprising a pair of wheeled trucks, a container provided adjacent the ends thereof with king pins received within cooperating sockets in said respective trucks, side bearings between said container and said trucks which together with said king pins being transmitted through said container and king pins.

4. A hot metal car or the like comprising a pair of wheeled trucks, a container provided adjacent the ends thereof vwith king pins received within cooperating soc ets in said respective trucks, side bearings between said container and said trucks which together with said king pins comprise the sole means of connection between said container and said trucks.

5. A hot metal car or the like comprising, in combination, a plurality of wheeled trucks each provided with a bolster and a center bearing, a container provided with a king pin adapted to be received by said center bearing, and draft gear carried by said bolsters and disposed in substantially the same horizontal line as said king pin and center bearing connection.

A6. A hot metal car or the like comprising, in combination, a pair of multiple wheeled trucks each comprising a pair of smaller trucks having holstersv resiliently mounted' thereon, a superbolster supported by the bolsters through the intermediary oi center and side bearings, a container provided with a king pin adjacent each end thereof and adapted to be pivotally supported by bearings in the respective superbolsters.

7. A hot metal car or the like comprising, in combination, a pair of multiple wheeled trucks each comprising a pair of smaller trucks having -bolsters resiliently mounted thereon, a superbolster supported by the holsters through the intermediary of center and side bearings, a container provided with a king pin adjacent each end thereof'and adapted to be pivotally supported by bearings 'in the respective superbolsters, and draft gear carried by said superbolsters.

8. A hot metal car or the like'comprising, in combination, a wheeled car truck, center and side bearings thereon, a tiltable container carried thereby and provided with a hemispherical king pin seated in a similarly shaped socket'inthe center bearing. 1

9.. A hot metal car or the like comprising, in combination, a wheeled car truck, center and side bearings thereon, a tiltable container carried thereby and provided with a hemispherical king pin seated in a similarly'shaped socket in the center bearing, and a plurality of anti-friction members contained within said socket for rotatably supporting said king pin.

10. A unit of railway rolling stock of the class described comprising a pair of Wheeled trucks each provided with side and center bearing members, an elongated load container supported at each of its ends by one of said trucks, center bearing members on said container resting -on the center bearing members of said respective trucks and side bearing members cooperating with the side bearing members on said trucks, the side bearing member on said container and one of said trucks being provided with a substantial clearance therebetween, but no clearancel being provided between the side bearingmember of the container and the other truck, whereby the necessary flexibility is provided to permit weaving of said unit upon an uneven track.

11. The combination of a hot metal car or the like with means for discharging the contents thereof comprising a container mounted upon wheeled supporting trucks, cooperating side and center bearing elements on said trucks and said container, said side bearings including convex anti-friction rollers permitting rotation of said container about said rollers as a fulcrum for unloading purposes. ,Y g

12. The combination of a hot metal car or the like with means for discharging the contents thereof comprising a container mounted upon wheeled supportingtrucks, cooperating side and center bearing elements on said trucks and lsaid container, said side bearings including convex anti-friction rollers permitting rotation oi' said container about said rollers as a fulcrum for unloading'purposes, said center bearings comprising king pins and cooperating sockets therefor, the transverse curvature thereof being substantially centered about said rollers whereby.

upon rocking movement of the container about said rollers said center bearing elements may be readily parted.

13. A car for transporting hot metal and the like comprising a container member and a mobile supporting member, the container member normally resting upon the supporting member, one of said members having a plurality of projecting elements which normally project within corresponding recesses in the other, the interengaging elements and recesses being disposed beneath the container and preventing relative bodily rectilinear movement of the said members in any direction in a horizontal plane but permitting the container member to be lifted from the supporting member along a curved path about an axis positioned to one side of the container, whereby when the container is in its normal position for travel and the projecting elements and recesses are engaged, draft stresses may be transmitted through the elements between the container and the mobile supporting member.

14. A car for transporting hot metal or the like comprising a plurality of wheeled car trucks, a

container having means rigid therewith adapted to directly engage and bear upon said trucks, whereby the trucks directly support the container, and means for preventing relative rectilinear movement of'said container and trucks in a horizontal plane, whereby draft forces may be transmitted between said trucks through said container, said container being freely removable from said trucks by the application of lifting forces thereto.

15. A car for transporting hot metal or the like comprising two spaced car trucks, a container having means rigidly secured thereto which is adapted to engage cooperating means rigid with the car trucks, respectively, whereby the trucks directly support the container, said cooperating means rigid with container and trucks respectively permitting the container to be freely removed from the trucks by the application of lifting forces to the container, while permitting the trucks to swivel relatively to the container and preventing relative rectilinear movement of the container and trucks upon the application oi' draft forces.

16. A car for transporting hot metal or the like including a wheeled car truck, a hot metal container, and means for connecting said container to and mounting it directly upon said truck, said means comprising interengaging members rigid with the container and truck respectively which permit the truck to swivel with respect to the container while preventing relative rectilinear movement thereof.

17. A hot metal car or the like comprising, in combination, two wheeled trucks each provided with a bolster and a center bearing, and a container having king pins rigidly secured to its undersurf ace adjacent the container ends, said king pins being adapted to be received by said center bearings, and draft gear carried by said holsters.

JOHN` D. PUGH.

Référencé par
Brevet citant Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
US4591064 *6 déc. 198427 mai 1986Westerwaelder Eisenwerk Gerhard GmbhFreight container
US5090773 *15 avr. 199125 févr. 1992Bernard GuillaumeDump truck with interfitting polygonal dump body and supporting cradle
DE1196821B *14 nov. 196015 juil. 1965Amsted Ind IncVerfahren und Vorrichtung zum Vergiessen von Stahl mittels Druckgas unter Verwendung einer Giesstrommel
Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis105/261.2, 105/362, 414/384, 105/272
Classification internationaleB22D41/12, B22D41/00
Classification coopérativeB22D41/12
Classification européenneB22D41/12