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Numéro de publicationUS2276582 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication17 mars 1942
Date de dépôt3 mai 1939
Date de priorité3 mai 1939
Numéro de publicationUS 2276582 A, US 2276582A, US-A-2276582, US2276582 A, US2276582A
InventeursKrevis Emil A
Cessionnaire d'origineKrevis Emil A
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Sanitary paper slipper
US 2276582 A
Résumé  disponible en
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Revendications  disponible en
Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

March 17, 1942. I E. A. KR'EVIS 2,276,582

SANITARY PAPER SLIPPER Filed May 3, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 March 17, 1942. K V 2,276,582

SANITARY, PAPER SLIPPER Filed May 5, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Mar. 17, 1942 UETE ST 4 Claims.

My invention contemplates and provides a novel sanitary paper slipper for use in locker rooms, shower rooms, physicians offices, clubs, hotels, Pullman cars, and in the home. It is well known that the common, contagious trichophytic skin infection known as Athletes foot is contracted most often by contact of the bare feet with the infected damp floors of public locker rooms and showers. The infection may, however, be contracted in seemingly safe surroundings. It is therefore desirable at all times to avoid contact of the bare feet with the floor, not only for ones own protection, but also to avoid transmitting the infection to others. Inexpensive paper slippers, which may be discarded after using, are not a new article of commerce, but to the best of my knowledge none of the slippers previously known to the art offers the advantages inherent in my novel construction nor has combined in it the varied advantages characteristic of the present invention. Certain problems in this art have never successfully been met at all. For instance, it has been the object of many previous patentees to provide a folding paper slipper having a tendency to cling to the foot of the wearer despite the manifold variations in the size of feet for which, nevertheless, one size of slipper may be provided. It is well known that this desiderata has not been met, for everyone has had to contend with the annoyance of losing the usual paper slipper while it is being worn.

A disadvantage of the paper slippers known to the art is their tendency to absorb moisture from wet floors because the slippers have usually been fabricated from porous absorbent paper. Ordinary paper slippers cannot, in fact, be worn at all under a shower, thereby creating the danger of their users contracting infections often present in locker rooms and like situations, because they become soggy and lose their shape and often wash down the drain and clog up the same, so that he is forced to doff his paper slippers prior to entering the shower bath.

Accordingly, one of the objects of my invention is to provide a sanitary paper slipper suitable for use in both wet and dry environments.

Another object of my invention is to provide an inexpensive paper slipper of substantial construction and appearance which may tastefully be decorated by the printing of artistic design-s thereupon.

Another object of my invention is to provide a sanitary paper slipper capable of being folded into a compact shape.

Another object of my invention is to provide a sanitary paper slipper capable of being folded into a shape lending itself to storing of a supply of these slippers in automatic vending machines or dispensing cases.

Another object of my invention is to provide a sanitary paper slipper presenting no sharp edges to the foot of the wearer.

Another object of my invention is to provide a sanitary paper slipper designed so that upon unfolding the slipper the natural tendency of the folds to resume their previous folded condition causes the slipper to hug the foot.

Other objects and advantages of my invention will become apparent upon reading the following specification, taken in conjunction with the appended drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of my paper slipper;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation thereof;

Fig. 3 is a developed plan view of my slipper looking at the foot contacting face of the sole;

Fig. 4 is a view of the partially folded heel portion of my slipper;

Fig 5 is a view of the heel portion of my slipper showing a progressive stage of the folding operation;

Fig. 6 is a view of the toe portion of my slipper partially folded, preparatory to final assemv;

Fig. 7 is a view of the heel portion of my slipper partially folded in the position usually assumed when the slipper is to be Worn, preparatory to final assembly;

Fig. 8 is a view of the heel portion of the com- "pleted slipper partially collapsed preparatory to I folding the slipper into a compact shape;

Fig. 9 is a plan view of my completed slipper folded fiat preparatory to folding the slipper along the middle;

Fig. 10 is a top plan view of my completed slipper folded into its most compact shape;

Fig. 11 is a bottom plan view of my completed slipper folded into its most compact form; and

Fig. 12 is a perspective of my completed slipper opened and ready to wear.

In all of the figures like reference numerals refer to like parts.

My novel sanitary paper slipper, whose general appearance is best suggested by Figs. 1, 2

and 12, may be manufactured from a single piece of strong paper, out and creased as in Fig, 3. The slipper is preferably made of impervious, waterproofed paper, but if it is intended for use only as a lounging slipper in hotels, in sleeping .cars, or at home, the paper need not be waterproofed, but is preferably a more decorative material, such as tinted stock, whose ornamental effect may be increased by judicious application of tastefully decorative colored printing.

Referring to Fig. 3, the base of my slipper comprises the relatively narrow trapezoidal rear portion I and the broad inverted trapezoidal sole portion 3, joined to the rear portion I at downward fold 2. Throughout this specification I shall refer to folds as downward if the ridge of the fold extends upward from the plane of the figure being described, and as upward if the ridge of the fold extends downward from the plane of the figure.

A heel tab is joined to the extreme end of the rear portion I at upward fold 4. The outer side members 7, contiguous with the sides of rear portion I, are joined thereto at the upward folds 6. The side members I are provided with flaps 9 and I I, joined thereto at the upward folds 8 and I0, respectively. The inner side members I3 are joined to the outer side members I at upward fold I2, and bear flaps I5 and. I1 joined thereto at upward folds I4 and I 6, respectively. The side members I and I3 also contain upward and downward folds or creases I8 and 20, respectively,.

' at the crease I2 are not readily'torn because the turned over edge imparts great strength to the side edges of the slipper, and it presents a rounded edge to the foot, instead of the sharp edge of a single sheet of paper.

The completed heel portion is formed by interlocking and pasting together tab 5 and the two double tabs consisting of tabs 9 and I5, as illustrated in Figs. 5 and 7. By the application of a waterproof adhesive to one of the tabs 9, as illustrated by the dot 33 in Fig. 3, a very strong and rigid heel portion may thus be formed. I have found it advisable to prevent contact of the sharp edges of the inner side members I3 with the inner corners of folds 6 near the heel of the slipper. Therefore, the width of the side member is preferably decreased by indenting it as at 38 near the heel. By this expedient I prevent cutting of fold B when it is already moist, by the sharp edge of side members I3, which no longer touch folds 6.

The double inward creases formed by the nesting of folds 8 and I4 and the double outward creases I8 and 20 permit the composite rear portion of the heel portion to be collapsed as illustrated in Fig. 8. When the heel is collapsed the double tab 2I fits snugly against the inner side member I3. Because my slippers are preferably made in only one size, the length of the slipper is selected so that at least ninety-five percent of the adult population can wear them comfortably. To make the slippers long enough to wear by the remaining five percent of the adult population would make them difficult for the majority to wear. People with exceptionally long feet can wear the slipper as in Fig. 8, which gives more heel room than the unfolded heel.

The sole of my slipper is provided with lateral tabs 23 joined thereto at upward folds 22, and a toe cap 25. The top cap is of relatively broad trapezoidal shape somewhat wider than the sole portion 3. Its edges 24 are designed to be pasted over the outer surfaces of flaps 23, and over flaps I1 and II. The pasted area 34 of the cap 25 has been delineated in Fig. 3.

To allow the toe portion to be folded fiat, as well as to cling to the foot of the wearer, I provide two downward creases 28 and one upward crease 26 along the central portion of the toe cap.

When the toe portion of the slipper is assembled, as in Fig. 6, the lower edge of flap I! is guided into the rear end of fold 22. While flap I1 is held in this position, theadhesive bearing edge 24 of toe cap 25 is pasted over flaps II, I! and 23. Because flap I'! has been forced into alignment with fold 22, which is at an angle to fold B, a stress is set up in the material contiguous to flap II, which causes the forward end of the fold 6 to roll over and this causes an additional fold 36 (Figs. 9, 10 and 12) to be created. In Figs. 9 and 12 the original fold is noticeable as a line 6 a little above the new fold 36. As previously mentioned, this separate fold 36 may be incorporated into the blank, Fig. 3, which creates somewhat softened corners at the widest extremity of the shoe. This reduces the likelihood of a corner of one slipper scratching the inner part of the other ankle or foot when walking.

Tab 29 located at the extremity of the toe cap 25 is folded under the end edge 30 thereof to stiffen the exposed portion of said edge and to protect the foot against cutting by a single paper edge. The remainder of edge 30 is pasted across the width of tabs I! and I I, projecting under the edge of the toe cap 25. A perspective of the slipper assembled as described and ready for use is shown in Fig. 12

One of the advantages of my slipper construction is the ability compactly to fold the slipper into a bundle suitable for storing in and delivery from automatic dispensers. I have already described the manner in which the heel portion of my slipper can be collapsed by the manipulation of creases 8, I4, I13 and 20. When this has been done, as shown in Fig. 8, the side members I and I3 can be collapsed against the sole of the slipper, as shown in Fig. 9. The toe cap 25 is likewise collapsible into substantially co-planar' relationship with the sole, because the previously alluded to creases 26 and 28 take up the excess plan View of the slipper compactly folded as shown in Fig. 10 is readily recognized as the left portion of Fig. 9. The corresponding bottom plan view of the compactly folded slipper, corresponding to the right portion of Fig. 9, is shown in Fig. 11.

Because my paper slipper preferably is constructed of waterproof paper, it may be worn in the shower without danger of disintegration, but to avoid losing the slipper from the foot after water has accumulated in the slipper, I provide a plurality of apertures 32 at locations allowing water readily to drain out of the slipper.

One of the important features of my invention is the method of folding and assembling the paper slipper. This method is of great importance from the standpoint of both manual and machine fabrication of the slippers. To deviate therefrom results usually in ruining the slipper,

because the separate steps of folding and pasting must be performed in their right order if the proper shape is to be imparted to the slipper.

The first step in assembling the slipper is to apply a dot of adhesive 33 to tab 9 of the blank shown in Fig. 3. Inner side members l3 are then folded over onto outer side members 1, without however allowing tab IE to adhere to tab 9 bearing the adhesive. Center tab 5 is next interleaved, as in Fig. 4, with the non-adhesive bearing pair of tabs 9 and I5, and these three tabs are then interleaved between the adhesive bearing set of tabs 9 and I5. To secure proper adhesion the resulting heel portion structure is collapsed and pressed into the position illustrated in Fig. 4 until the adhesive has dried, which requires about one minute.

The heel portion having been formed, assembly of the toe portion of the slipper is properly begun. It is necessary that the heel portion be assembled first as it is impossible to give the proper shape to the slipper, for instance, by deviating from fold 6 to produce new fold 38 as previously described, until the set of the heel portion is determined. To give the proper shape to the toe portion, the heel portion is first completely collapsed so that the side members lie flat against the sole. Tabs I! are then adjusted into fold 22 behind tabs 23, and tabs H, I! and 23 are also pressed fiat against the sole. Adhesive having been applied to the toe cap 25 over the area denoted 24 in Fig. 3, the toe cap is applied to the assembly, flap 3| being held during this process to prevent expansion and to align the toe cap with the flaps to which it is to be fastened. After holding the toe cap against the sole and the appurtenant tabs for about one minute the adhesive has set and the slipper has taken on its final form.

It is to be noted that the final shape of the slipper is taken on during the step of forming the toe portion. For this reason it is necessary that this last step be carefully conducted so that the toe portion of fold B be properly rolled over into new fold 36. That is the secret of getting the proper shape, and it depends upon having an accurately prefolded heel portion, as well as upon aligning the edges of tabs H with folds 22.

Although I have described a preferred embodiment of my invention, I do not wish to be limited thereto, but consider my invention to lie in the abstract relation of elements constituted to provide, among other things, a collapsible self-adjusting heel portion, double form fitting sides, and a triple reinforced expanding toe, and in the method of folding and assembling the slipper to arrive at a predetermined form by following a set sequence of assembly.

I claim:

1. In a paper slipper a substantially fiat base portion forming a sole, the front of the base portion being bounded by two lines meeting at the center of the base with an obtuse angle between them, a toe portion formed on the forward end of said base portion and folded back along said two lines at the front of the base, means connecting the sides of the toe portion to the sides of the base, the material at the rear of the toe portion when folded back being greater in width than the base, the toe portion having two folds therein extending lengthwise, the two folds in the toe member and the angular folds between the front of the toe member and the front of the base portion permitting the toe member to be folded into a plane adjacent to the base portion and of a width equal to that of the base portion.

2. In a paper slipper a base portion forming a sole, a toe portion formed on the forward end of said base portion and folded backwardly above said base portion, the rear of the toe portion being folded under to reenforce the rear edge of the toe portion and prevent its cutting the wearer's foot, a side portion formed on each side of said base portion, means for attaching the forward ends of the side portions to the rear of the toe portion, the upper edges of the side portions being folded inwardly to reenforce the side portions and to prevent the side portions from cutting the sides of the wearers foot.

3. In a paper slipper a base portion forming a sole, a toe portion formed on the forward end of said base portion and folded backwardly above said base portion, the rear of the toe portion being folded under to reenforce the rear edge of the toe portion and prevent its cutting the wearer's foot, a side portion formed on each side of said base portion, means for attaching the forward ends of the side portions to the rear of the toe portion, the upper edges of the side portions being folded inwardly to reenforce the side portions and to prevent the side portions from cutting the sides of the wearers foot, a heel portion formed on the rear of said base portion folded to a vertical position, means for attaching the heel portion to each of said side portions, the upper edge of the heel portion being folded inwardly to reenforce the heel portion and to. prevent cutting the wearers heel.

4. In a paper slipper a base portion having seven substantially straight extremities, the sides of the base portion comprising two pairs of substantially straight folds, one on each side extending from the front to a position substantially at the ball of a wearers foot, and one on each side extending from said latter position to the rear of the base portion, the front of the base portion comprising two folds at an angle to one another, the rear of the base portion comprising a single heel fold extending across the base portion, all of said folds being foldable into planes substantially parallel with the base portion and within the width and length of the base portion.

EMIL A. KREVIS.

Référencé par
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Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis36/9.00A
Classification internationaleA43B3/10
Classification coopérativeA43B3/106
Classification européenneA43B3/10D