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Numéro de publicationUS2300635 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication3 nov. 1942
Date de dépôt16 nov. 1940
Date de priorité16 nov. 1940
Numéro de publicationUS 2300635 A, US 2300635A, US-A-2300635, US2300635 A, US2300635A
InventeursHenry Shepherd
Cessionnaire d'origineHenry Shepherd
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Heel
US 2300635 A
Résumé  disponible en
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Revendications  disponible en
Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

Nov. 3, 1942. H SHEPHERD HEEL Patented Nov. 3, 1942 irs eras i. OFFICE 3 Claims.

This invention relates to foot wear and relates more particularly to heels for shoes, boots, slippers, etc. A general object of this invention is to provide simple, practical and very long wearing heels.

Another object of this invention is to provide novel heels embodying wear taking parts which may be shifted` or turned fromtime to time to present new or substantially unworn wearing surfaces. Heels usually. wear or run down very rapidly at their rear or outer edges, this uneven wearing usually being excelerated in the case of rubber heels, and the heels whether they be of leather, rubber or other material, usually require reconditioning or replacement at short intervals. The present invention overcomes this difficulty of the conventional heels, providing novel heels which are very long lived by reason of their advanceable or turnable wear taking parts.

Another object of this invention is to provide -as rubber, which may be shifted vor turned from time to time to present new wearing surfaces and thus greatly prolong their lives and which may be easily replaced after extensive use.

Another object of this invention is to provide heels of the character referred to having simple yet very eiiective and dependable means for retaining or securing the replaceable and turnable caps or wear taking members to the heel bodies.

Another object of the invention is to provide heels of the character mentioned having simple releasable means for retaining the turnable wear taking cap members in various rotative positions so that the members may be advanced or turned from time to time to evenly distribute the wear, which means is optional and may be cut off or otherwise removed if it is desired to have the cap members automatically turn or advance by the action resulting from thc regular use of the shoes.

A further object of this invention is to provide improved heels of the character referred to which are inexpensive to manufacture and easy to install or embody in the foot wear.

The various objects and features of my invention will be fully understood from the `following detailed description of a typical preferred form and application of the invention, throughout which description reference is made to the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary side elevation of a shoe ,showingr a typical form of the'heel offtheinven- LEO tion with the heel and adjacent part of the shoe in vertical cross secti0n. Fig. 2 is a fragmentary elevation of the under side of the shoe and heel. Fig. 3 is an enlarged elevation view of the under side of the heel apart from the shoe and Fig. 4 is a perspective View of the replaceable turnable yielding cap member.

The heels of the present invention may be` varied in construction, materials, design and mode of attachment to adapt them for use on foot wear of diiierent kinds. In the following detailed description I will describe the typical form of the invention illustrated in the drawing, it being understood that this disclosure is not to be construed as limiting or restricting the scope of the invention.

The heel provided by this invention may be said to comprise, generally, a heel body It), a detachable and turnable yielding pad or member I I and means I2 for removably and turnably securing the member I I to the heel body IQ.

The heel body I0 is adapted to be attached to the shoe S or embodied in the shoe either at the time of manufacture of the shoe or as a replacement for the original shoe heel following the fabrication of the shoe. The heel body I0 may be formed of any selected rather hard rigid material. In practice the body ID may be formed of laminated leather, a suitable thermo-plastic material, wood, or the like. The shape of the body I0, of course, depends to a large extent upon the shape and type of shoe S. As shown. the body I0 is of conventional design being rounded at its rear edge to present a curved surface I3 which conforms generally to the rear part of the shoe Sand having ilat generally parallel upper and lower sides.

In accordance with the invention a socket I4 is formed in the under side of the body It] to receive the pad or cap member II. The socket I4 is formed in the rear portion of the body I0 to be open at the rear end of the heelbody. As illustrated, the socketv I4 is cylindrical having a cylindrically curved side wal1 I5 which dies out at the opposite sides of the heel body I0 Where the curved body surface I3 merges with the side surfaces of the body. The rear surface I3 of the body I0 may be cylindrically curved and the socket wall I5 may be concentric with and may be of the same diameter of curvature as the surface I3 and the-wall I=5 may die out where the surface I3 merged-with the 'side surface of the body I 0. The upper wall of the socket I4 is preferably iiat and generally horizontal to be parallel withthe under side ofthe heel body I0,

-ient shock and jar absorbing element.

In the preferred construction the socket I4 is quite large in diameter to occupy the major portion of the heels under side and is located to leave but a small portion of the heel body I to present a lower surface at the forward part of the heel.

The heel body I0 may be tacked or nailed to the sole I6 of the shoe S. There may be vmarginal rows of nails I'I driven through the forward part of the heel body into the shoe sole structure. In accordance with the invention the upper wall of the socket I4 has a number of dimples or depressions I8. in size and shape. trated there are two annular rows of depressions I8, the rows being concentric with the socket wallv` I and the heel body surface I3. Nails I9 may The depressions I8 may be alike k In the particular case illusinvention the groove 2| is under cut, that is, its side walls flare or diverge upwardly and its mouth or entrance is restricted. As shown, the groove 2| has curved or concave side walls merging with a. concave upper wall so that it is practically cylindrical in transverse cross section with a restricted mouth or open lower side. It is to be understood that the groove 2| is continuous and substantially uniform in transverse cross section.

The ridge 22 is formed to fit or occupy the groove 2|. The ridge 22 is preferably of the same cross sectional shape as the groove 2| and is proportioned to rather closely fit the groove. The

In accordance with the invention the ridge 22 is formed of a combe driven through the body |0 fromthe socket I4 to assist in securing the body to the wall I6 and these nails may be located to have their heads or lower ends in the depressions I8. In the particular case illustrated there is` a nail III driven through the body I0 from each depression I8, it being understood that this is not always necessary-or desirable. When the nails I9 are driven through the body III from the depressions I8 the upper wall of the socket I4 is left smooth and without nail heads and hammer marks. Further, the depressions I8 provide a convenient means for spacing and locating the nails I9.

The member II is a, replaceable wear taking element and in most instances is a yielding resil- The member I I occupies the socket I4 so that its lower surface forms the principal active portion of the under side of the heel. In the preferred construction the member I I is designed and proportioned to t the socket I4 being a substantially disc-shaped member having a cylindrically curved `periphery which is adapted to fit against the cylindrically curved wall I5. The member II preferably has a flat smooth upper surface for bearing on the upper wall cf the socket I4 and its lowerY surface may be substantially horizontal to lie flush with the under side of the heel body II'I.

'v-The lower face of the member II may have any selected type of nish, design, pattern or tread. The replaceable and turnable heel member I| may be formed of different materials. In most instances it will be preferred to form the member `II of rubber, rubber composition, synthetic rubber, or material of this character combined with 'or reenforced by fabric.

The member II may be quite soft or yielding to be effective in absorbing the jars and shocks usually accompanying walking. The member II is a simple, inexpensive, one-piece element and forms a ush continuation of the heel body I0 when in the active position. In this connection it will be observed that the periphery 2 of the member II may lie flush with and may form an even continuation of the rear surface I3 of the heel body Il).A

The means I2 removably and turnably secures the member II to the heel body I0. The -means I2 comprises a groove 2| in the upper wall of the socket I4 and a tongue or ridge 22 on the upper side of the member II for cooperating with the groove. The groove 2| is circular or annular and is preferably concentric with the sockshape or cross section. In accordance with the pressible resilient material. Where the member is formed of rubber, rubber composition, synthetic rubber, or the like, the ridge 22 is formed integral with the member. The compressible resilient ridge 22 is adapted to be forced into and out of the groove 2|. In attaching the member I| to the body III the member II is first centrally located in the socket I4 and is then pressed or hammered, or both, to cause the ridge 22 to enter the groove. 'Ihe rounded or flared major portion of the ridge 22 is compressed as the ridge is forced into the groove 2| and following its passage through the restricted mouth of the groove expands to occupy or fill the flared upper part of the groove. This secures or keys the member I I to the heel body I0. While the ridge 22rather closely fits the groove 2| as above described, the fit is not so tight that the member II cannot turn. The flared ridge 22 engaged in the under cut groove 2| securely and dependably attaches the member II to the body I0 and yet allows the member to turn' with respect to the heel body. The large diametered ridge 22 engaged in the groove 2| keys or secures the member to the heel body I0 along or adjacent the edge portions of the member assuring a dependable connection.

When the member II is to be removed or detached it is pried from the body I0 to pull or disengage the ridge 22 from the groove 2|. The prying action may be'started at one point by a suitable tool engaged between the body I0 and the member I I and when the ridge 22 has started from the groove 2| the member may be readily pulled free. The attaching ridge 22 engaged in the groove 2| allows the upper side of the member II to flatly and evenly bear on the upper wallof the socket I4 so that the member has full or ample bearing on the body I0. spaced depressions I8 reduce the total area 0f engagement between the upper side of the member and the body IIJ and thus increases the shock absorbing and jar absorbing capacity of the member II. When the wearers weight is applied to the heel the yielding resilient material of the member II may extend or bulge into the depressions I8 increasing the give or compression of the member II. The depressions I8 are distributed or spaced throughout the upper face of the member and greatly increase the resiliency and yieldability of the member.

The means I2 further includes an optional and removable structure for releasably holding the member II in selected rotative positions. .The -uper side of the member I I is provided with one or more cogs, lugs or buttons 23 for cooperating with the depressions |8. In the form of the invention illustrated there is a single projection of button 23 on the upper side of the member The button 23 is preferably yieldable and resillent. Where the member I I is formed of rubber, rubber composition, synthetic rubber, or the like, the button 23 may be an integral part of the member. The button 23 is preferably, though not necessarily, spaced outwardly beyond the ridge 22 to cooperate with the outer row of depressions I8. The button 23 is formed or shaped to fit the depressions I8. Thus in the construction illustrated the button 23 is partially spherical or dome-like to fit the concave or partially spherical depressions I8. The engagement of the button 23 in a depression I8 operates to hold the member II against turning. When it is desired to advance or turn the member I I to present a new or unworn surface at the wearing part of the heel assembly, the member II is forcibly turned so that the button 23 is forced out of its depression I8. When the member II turns the button 23 engages in the next depression I8 or an adjacent depression to again hold the member II against rotation. In the event it is desired to have the member II automatically advance or turn the button 23 is ground olf, cut off or otherwise removed to leave the upper side of the membar II plain. In some cases it may be desired to provide or manufacture members I I with buttons 23 and members II without buttons 23 to meet the demand for both types.

It is believed that the utility and practicability of the heel provided by this invention will be readily understood from the foregoing detailed description. The heel body I0 is readily applied to the shoe either at the time of manufacture or as a replacement heel body. Following the application of the body I0 to the shoe the member II is secured to the body. This is done as described above by forcing the tongue 22 into the undercut groove 2 I. Where the member I I is provided with the button 23 it is turned and brought to a position where the button engages in one of the depressions I8 to hold the membe against turning. The upper side of the member I I bears on the upper wall of the socket I4 and the ridge 22 engaging in the groove 2| retains the member in this position. When the member II is formed of rubber, or the like, it constitutes an effective jar and shock absorbing cap for the heel. The spaced dimples or depressions I8 opposing the upper side of the member I I make the member Il more yielding and resilient. After extensive use the rear under surface parts of the member I I may be worn or run down. The member I I is then turned to bring a new or substantially unworn under surface part to the rear of the heel. The member I I may be forcibly turned to disengage the button 23 from its depression I8 and the button engages in another depression to retain the member II in the new position. The heel is thus conditioned for further use.

The member II may be turned from time to time to present new wearing surfaces thus giving the member I I and the heel generally a very long effective life. With extended use the member I I may become worn down throughout its circumference. In this case the member I I may be pried free and replaced by a new member I I. The forward part of the body I0 which is exposed at the under side of the heel receives but little Wear and the heel body may receive several replacement members II before it is excessively Worn. If it is desired to have the member II turn automatically as the wearer walks the button 23 is not employed or if the button is formed on the member I I it is ground 01T or otherwise removed. The member II engaged in the socket It is dependably supported against dislodging forces and has little or no tendency to warp. The continuous bulged ridge 22 engaged in the under cut groove 2| of large diameter dependably retains the member in place.

Having described only a typical preferred form and application of my invention, I do not wish to be limited or restricted to the specific details herein set forth, but wish to reserve to myself any variations or modifications that may appear to those skilled in the art or fall Within the scope of the following claims.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A heel of the character described comprising a body, the under side of the'body having a circular undercut groove and spaced depressions, a yielding turnable cap member on the under side of the body covering the depressions, a circular ridge on the upper side of the member shiftably fitting the groove to turnably retain the member on the body, and a button on the member engageable in the depressions to hold the member in selected rotative positions.

2. A heel comprising a heel body having a socket in its under side, the upper Wall of the socket having a curved undercut groove and spaced depressions, a cap member in the socket, a curved flaring ridge on the member engaged in the groove to turnably secure the member to the body, and a button on the member engageable with the depressions to hold the member in different rotative positions.

3. A heel comprising a heel body having a socket in its .under side, the upper wall of the socket having ya curved undercut groove and spaced depressions, a yielding resilient cap member, a curved ridge on the member adapted to be forced into the groove to removably and turnably secure the member in the socket, and a button on the member cooperable with the depressions to releasably hold the member in selected rotative positions.

HENRY SHEPHERD.

Référencé par
Brevet citant Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
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Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis36/36.00R, 36/39
Classification internationaleA43B21/433, A43B21/00
Classification coopérativeA43B21/433
Classification européenneA43B21/433