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Numéro de publicationUS2312841 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication2 mars 1943
Date de dépôt28 août 1940
Date de priorité28 août 1940
Numéro de publicationUS 2312841 A, US 2312841A, US-A-2312841, US2312841 A, US2312841A
InventeursLewis Howard B
Cessionnaire d'origineB F Mcdonald Company
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Protective armor
US 2312841 A
Résumé  disponible en
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Revendications  disponible en
Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

l March 2, 194:3. H. B. LEWIS PROTECTIVE ARMOR Filed Aug. 28, 1940 Hownno a. Lewis M 'Arron/ver |.1ll llllllllullllll xiii--- i Patented Mar. 2, 1943 UNETED STATESPATENT @FFME PROTECTIVE ARMOR,

Howard B. Lewis, Venice, Calif., assignor to B. F.

McDonald Company, Los Angeles, Calif., a corporation of California 4 Claims.

This invention relates to a exible metal protector adaptable to the sole structure of shoes, boots and the like to prevent the penetration of sharp objects and, more particularly, to an improvement in a flexible metal protector which is inexpensive, suciently exible and affords adequate protection.

It is among the objects of this invention to provide a flexible metal protector such as may be made in the form of a sole which can be readily incorporated into the sole structure of shoes and boots and Without modification, which may be made of a material capable of providing ample protection against all hazards which may be encountered in idustrial use and which, itself, is inexpensive and adequately flexible to prevent discomfort by the addition of this protective means.

Other objects of this invention will become ap parent from a description of a preferred embodiment which is illustrated in the drawing and in which;

Fig. 1 is a plan view partly in section of a preferred .embodiment of my invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view of the same embodiment and illustrates the fabrication or assembly of the several parts used in the construction; and

Fig. 3 is a side elevationrof a shoe and partly in section showing the protector or armored sole interposed between the inner and outer sole of the shoe.

In adapting a metal protector to an ordinary construction of a shoe or boot, it is usually made in such a manner that it is formed as a protective or safety sole 4 and placed between the inner sole 2 and the outer sole 3 of a shoe I such as illustrated in Fig. 3. The safety sole generally extends the full length of the shoe, that is, it extends suiciently to include the heel 5 and thus is adaptable to protect the shoe I throughout its length, but should the heel itself serve as an adequate protector, it would not be necessary to extend the protective sole 4 further than to suiiciently lap the material of the heel.

My protective sole 4 includes a metal armorv or vplate which is preferably made of a noncorrosive metal and which affords ample protection for all uses. Because of my construction, it is not necessary that the material itself be of a nature that can be bonded to material in order to amply secure the metal in its proper protective position, although this characteristic, if present, can be utilized to an advantage. The material, which may be used,

can be a commercial stainless steel or carbon steel, or any other protective material and the selection will depend upon the results desired and the limits of cost in manufacture.

The protective sole incorporating my invention is made of a support I0 which is a fabric material impregnated with a bonding agent such as a phenolic resin or cellulose derivative material or rubberized fabric material. A plurality of metal elements Il made of thin flat sheet metal of suitable material and having some degree of flexibility are positioned on the support. A feature of this invention is that a material can be used, which may be a rigid metal material or material having a thickness that is not adequately flexible for use in shoes and boots, yet by fabricating in a certain manner the whole assembly is made sufficiently flexible so as not to interfere with the comfort of the article in which it is incorporated and it provides increased protection. Each of the elements ll should extend transversely across the sole, that is, extend across the width of the sole, but should terminate short of the full width of the fabric material to define a peripheral portion of fabric material extending beyond the protective metal layer and should be of such a width in thel direction of the length of the sole that the necessary or desired flexibility is provided. In other words, supplying the metal elements or strips Il of a narrower width to increase the number of strips or elements used in the construction will improve or increase the flexibility of the sole. Furthermore, the width of these members should vary to some extent depending upon their position in the sole. For instance, greater flexibility is required in the vicinity of the ball of the foot and in this location the elements should be made relatively narrower in width than in the location of the heel.

These protective elements or flat pieces of metal are arranged over the support lll in a successive manner in the direction of the length of the insole to dene a layer of metal over the area of sole to be protected and they are arranged in relation to each other so that each strip overlies or overlaps its adjacent strip a certain amount. The extent of overlap will depend again upon the position of the strip in the sole. It is necessary that this amount of overlap be suicient so that when the sole is iiexed to its maximum the amount of overlap will be sumcient to continue a complete layer of metal over the soleand not allow any gap to exist between the pieces. It is apparent that the extent of overlap needed can be readily determined and this requirement does not lessen or interfere with the extent of flexibility. Providing an excess of overlap of material Will not destroy the advantageous results gained by the application of this invention.

In order to adequately and securely position the metal strips or elements in their proper protective and related positions, pieces or strips of fabricated material I2 which may be similar to that used in providing the overlying layer or support are fastened or patched to the support in a particular manner and extend completely across the Width of the support. The Width, or dimension of the strip in the direction of the length of the sole, of each of these strips may depend upon the position of the strip upon the support and the Width of the metal strip which it is to retain and secure. For most purposes, these strips can be of about the same width and be large enough so that they are attached to the peripheral portion of the support I extending beyond the protective strips II and `thus define pockets. The base of the strip forming the bottom of the pocket iS to beof a suiicient size so that by its engagement with an underlying strip or the support ID it is able to restrain its metal insert against movement in that direction.

Referring specifically to Fig, 2, a fiat metal strip I la, is positioned onto the fabric layer or support I0 and retained in position by means of a fabric strip I2a. The support IS is shaped similar to the shape of the soles 2 and 3 of the shoe and the portion represented in Fig. 2 is that of the heel portion. The fabric strip I2a impregnated with a bonding agent extends the full width of the support I0 and it extends and is attached to the peripheral portion of the support in the direction of the length of the support a distance suiicient so that it is securely bonded to the support and the Vfree or unattached portion accommodates the metal strip I Ia. The next or adjacent metal strip I Ibis positioned over the fabric strip IZa securely bonded to the support I Il through the under strip which in turn is attached to the support. A similar strip I2b overlies the metal strip I Ib and holds it in place by engagement with the underlying fabric material. Successive strips I Ic and -I `I d are held in place vby their respective fabric strips I2c and I2d. In manufacturing practice, the fabric strips I2 would probably be tacked in place and the metal elements or inserts placed in position onto the support I0 and then by the application of heat and pressure the fabric material would the support Ill. After the application of heat and pressure the Whole assembly is made compact and unitary while containing a protective plate or armor which is flexible in nature and provides the necessary protection against injury by penetration of sharp objects. The peripheral portion of fabric material which completely surrounds the sole is utilized in fastening or attaching the sole to the sole of the shoe as by means of sewing or nailing.

In manufacture, the metal strips I I are placed onto the support Ic by means of a method comparable to shingling, that is, starting from one Vvside of the support one of the metal strips Il is l5 companying fabric strip I2 and then another positioned onto the support followed by its acmetal strip is positioned adjacent the first metal strip and so as to overlap this strip. Its fabric' strip is then placed over the second metal strip. This method is followed until the length of the sole is sufficiently covered, The other layer I3 is then positioned over` the assembly. The whole be bonded together so that the support contains in .addition to its fabric strip |10 the overlying transversely extending strips I 2 and carry the protective layer of a plurality of metal strips secured in proper related position.

While this assembly just described may be used as `the protective means, it is preferred to use a second fabric layer overlying the strips I2 and referred toas fabric layer -I3 of material and of 65 a size and shape similar to layer Il! and bonded to the strips I2 and to the layer IIJ. With this the full Width the layer I3 is `bonded directly to 75 assembly is then set to form a unitary sole.

With this arrangement a single metal layer is provided which is so constructed that the protective layer is retained in its proper position relative to the fabric layers and the sole of the shoe and is adequately retained and secured in this position during use while supplying the necessary flexibility required for such an installation and providing adequate protection A further advantage of this invention is that materials can be selected which themselves do not bond to impregnated material, but it is obvious that should material be used that in itself is bondable, it would additionally secure the elements in their proper relative positions. One of the purposes of this invention is to provide an arrangement or construction which in itself does not depend upon the bond of the metal material to the support and which is capable of retaining the metal layer in its proper position without impairing the comfort of a shoe.

Another advantage of my invention is that it permits a variation in the degree of flexibility throughout the length of the sole so that greater flexibility can be provided in the vicinity of the ball of the foot and less can be provided in the heel as represented in Fig. 2. This is accomplished, as heretofore mentioned, by pro-per selection of a width of protective strip vand using narrower strips where greater flexibility is desired.

'Also, by arranging the metal strips so that the overlying and underlying strips of each metal element extend across the full width of the element to form in effect two complete layers of protective metal, metal strips of less thickness can be used and this provides a more flexible layer. Obviously, this complete overlap of each element can be accomplished by providing or positioning the elements in relation to each other so that this amount of overlap occurs. l

I have explained the principle and modeof operation of my invention, and have illustrated and described what I now consider to represent its best embodiment. However, I desire to have it understood that, Within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practicedotherwise than as specifically illustrated and described.

I claim:

l. A flexible protector metal sole having a portion of greater flexibility than the remaining portion comprising a fabric support impregnated with a bonding agent, a fabric material bonded to the support and having thin nat receiving portions extending transversely of the sole and successively along the length of the sole, a thin flat insert of protective metal in each of the receiving portions and arranged to overlap an adjacent insert to define a continuous layer of flexible protective metal and the inserts being narrower in width at the location of greater flexibility.

2. A protective sole having a portion of greater ilexibility than the remaining portion comprising a pair f layers of fabric material impregnated with a bonding agent, a plurality of relatively thin metal elements extending transversely of the sole and having a width in the direction of the length of the sole depending upon the location of the element relative to its position on the sole, the elements being arranged in overlying relation, the metal elements being of a length less than the width of the sole at their respective locations to dene a peripheral portion of fabric material extending beyond each end of the metal elements, the narrower elements being positioned in the portion of the sole of greater flexibility, and means bonded to the layers to accommodate each of the metal elements to retain and secure the elements in overlying relation' and in their respective position, and comprising a plurality of fabric layers extending transversely of the sole and successively arranged along the length of the sole and defining a pocket for each metal element, and each layer being bonded securely to each overlying layer and to its peripheral portion retaining its element i-n proper position.

3. A fiexible protective sole comprising a soleshaped fabric sheet, a plurality of narrow thin metal strips extending transversely of said sheet with their ends spaced inwardly from the adjacent edges of the sheet and with their longitudinal marginal portions disposed in overlapping relation with one another, a plurality of separate fabric strips extending transversely across substantially the full width of said sheet with their longitudinal marginal portions disposed in overlapping relation with one another, said fabric strips being disposed between said metal strips in overlapping engagement therewith and each fabric strip extending outwardly in all directions beyond the edges of one of the metal strips engaging it to provide a projecting side portion lying in face-to-face relation with an overlapping fabric strip, a second sole-shaped fabric sheet overlying said strips, and means bonding together the engaging faces of the fabric strips and sheets to thereby form closed fabric pockets in which the metal strips are retained.

4. A flexible protective metal sole having a portion of greater flexibility than the remaining portion, comprising a fabric support, a fabric material attached to the support and having thin flat receiving portions extending transversely of the sole and successively along the length of the sole, a thin flat insert of protective metal in each of the receiving portions and arranged to overlap an adjacent insert to denne a continuous layer of flexible protective metal, and the inserts being narrower in width at the location of greater flexibility.

HOWARD B. LEWIS.

Référencé par
Brevet citant Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
US2920008 *22 mars 19575 janv. 1960Gentex CorpLaminated protective sole
US78146866 mars 200719 oct. 2010Nike, Inc.Lightweight and flexible article of footwear
US8024872 *7 janv. 200827 sept. 2011Raymond Anthony PettisShoe sole protector
US8458928 *24 août 201011 juin 2013Nike, Inc.Lightweight and flexible article of footwear
US867159313 mai 201318 mars 2014Nike, Inc.Lightweight and flexible article of footwear
US20100313447 *24 août 201016 déc. 2010Nike, Inc.Lightweight And Flexible Article Of Footwear
Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis36/30.00R, 36/73
Classification internationaleA43B7/32
Classification coopérativeA43B7/32
Classification européenneA43B7/32