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Numéro de publicationUS2340582 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication1 févr. 1944
Date de dépôt26 déc. 1941
Date de priorité26 déc. 1941
Numéro de publicationUS 2340582 A, US 2340582A, US-A-2340582, US2340582 A, US2340582A
InventeursHarold Cushman Lee
Cessionnaire d'origineUnited Shoe Machinery Corp
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Shoe and method of manufacture
US 2340582 A
Résumé  disponible en
Images(4)
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Revendications  disponible en
Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

Feb. 1, 1944. L. H. CUSHMAN SHOE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE Filed Dec, 26, 1941 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fi s I, 1944. CUSIHMAN 2,340,582

snow AND. mm'non OF MANUFACTURE Filed Dec. 26, 1941 4 She ets-Sheet 2 Feb. 1, I944. w L. 'H. CUSHMAN 2,340,532 I SHOE AND METHOD OF mmimc'rmm Filed Dec. 26, 1941 4 She ets-Sheet s Fig.9

'Feb. 1, 1944. L. H.'CUSHMAN 2,340,582 SHOE AND METHOD OF MANvFXbTiJRE Filed Dec. 26, 1941 4 Sheets-Sheet 4' Patented Feb. 1, 1944 SHOE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE Lee Harold Cushman, Hamilton, Mass, assignor to United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Flemington, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application December 26, 1941, Serial No. 424,454

20 Claims.

This invention relates to shoes and to the manufacture of shoes and more particularly to the construction of shoe bottom parts by which they may be readily positioned in jigged relation to each other and to the last upon which they are assembled during the making of the shoe.

It is a matter of the utmost importance, in the manufacture of shoes and especially of the better grades of shoes, that the insole be positioned upon the last bottom in proper relation thereto and in such a manner as to obviate the possibility of the insole being shifted on the last, either intentionally or otherwise, for the reason that various operations such as toe lasting, side lasting, pulling-over, sewing and edge-trimming, are facilitated through proper positioning of the insole or of the outsole. Conversely, any malpositioning of the insole, either accidentally or through direct intervention of one of the operators on the shoe, is certain to render some or all of the subsequent operations much more difficult, it being not infrequently the case that the shoe, as a result of such displacement of the insole, is badly formed and has to be extensively cobbled or even disassembled and relasted. It is important also that the outsole be accurately located with respect to the insole and the upper, since such locating of the outsole facilitates such operations as outsole stitching, stitch indenting and edge setting.

It is an object of the invention to provide an improved shoe construction, and more particularly new sole units, which will expedite the assembly of shoe bottom parts in proper relation to each other.

It is another object of this invention to locate an insole on a last in such manner that it will not be displaced, also to facilitate the positioning of an outsole in predetermined relation to the insole and to the last, thereby insuring the' sole being spaced inwardly with respect to the 1 area to be engaged by the lasting margin of an upper when said parts are embodied in a shoe. The provision of insoles and outsoles of this construction facilitates greatly the operations of assembling and securing both soles to each other and to the upper, all in proper relation to each other.

In a preferred construction, an outsole member is provided with two or more jig pins in its central forepart and a jig pin or jig hole in its heel seat end for cooperation with an equal number of jig holes in the forepart of an insole and with corresponding jigging means in the heel seat end of the latter. Conveniently the jig pins on the outsole are carried by a plate of metal or of a plastic or other suitable material secured to the attaching or flesh surface of the outsole. If desired, this plate may extend from the forepart through the shank and into the heel seat end of the outsole, in which case a shank stiffener may be applied upon the shank portion of the plate and located thereon with reference to a scale carried by the exposed surface of said plate. The assembly of these parts may be carried a step further by placing a filler member over the jig pins at the forepart of the plate and then subjecting the assembled outsole, plate, filler and shank stiffener while adhesive- 1v secured to each other to a molding operation. thereby providing an outsole unit having jig pins, including a jig pin or a jig hole at its heel seat end, so that this unit may be readily assembled with respect to an insole on the last.

The invention contemplates also the provision of a jig plate unit including a flexible jig pin plate of the type described above as extending to the heel seat end of the sole members and having a scale to facilitate positioning of a shank stiffener thereon, the plate and the stiffener being bonded together and molded to make a unit which may be provided in quantity in lots of a range of sizes. Since the shank stiffener when applied serves to point out on the scale the size of the unit, the latter maybe readily selected for application to a sole member of the corresponding size.

According to a preferred method of manufacturing a shoe, a last bottom is provided with a plurality of spring supported and depressible jig pins of a length to project into but not completely through corresponding jig holes in an insole whereby the latter may be located in jigged relation to the last bottom. In this case, an outsole is provided on its attaching or flesh surface with jig pins so located as to be insertable into the jig holes of the insole to locate the outsole on said insole, said. jig pins being of a length to depress the jig pins of the last to the level of the last bottom, thereby facilitating subsequent removal of the shoe from the last.

These and other important features and characteristics of the invention, together with novel combinations of parts, will now be described in detail in the specification and then pointed out more particularly in the appended claims.

In the drawings,

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a sole blank commonly referred to as a block sole;

Fig. 2 is a similar view of a pattern showing the shape to which the block sole of Fig. 1 is cut in the machine of Fig. 3; i

Fig. 3 is a somewhat diagrammaticview of the Work holding parts of a sole rounding machine; I v

Fig. 4 is a perspective view partly in section of a plate provided with jig pins;

Fig. 5 is a similar view of a smaller plate carrying one jig pin;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a shoe sole with the jig plates of Figs. 4 and 5 located in proper position on the sole;

Fig. '7 is a perspective view of an insole and an upper assembled on a last;

' Fig. 8 is a detail view showing portions of a last, an insole, and an outsole together with a jig pin plate, all sectioned, to show the relationship of the jig pin to the insole and to the last;

Fig. 9 is a plan view of an outsole with a different form of jig pin plate; 7

Fig. 10 is a. perspective view of a molded outsole unit comprising the plate shown in Fig. 9 together with a shank piece and .filler member assembled with an outsole and then bonded and molded together;

Fig. 11 is a perspective view of an outsole provided with jig holes, a portion in section to show that the jig holes extend part way only through the thickness of the sole;

Fig. 12 is a perspective view of an upper and an insole assembled on a last, the insole bein provided with jig pin plates in the forepart and heel seat ends thereof;

Fig. 13 is a view in side elevation and partly in section of an upper and an insole assembled on a last by means of depressible jig pins carried by the last, a shank piece and an outsole unit being also shown in spaced relation to the insole on the last; and

Fig. 14 is a side view, partly in section, of an upper, an insole, and an outsole unit all assembled on a last clamped against the pad of an outsole laying machine.

While various methods may obviously be employed in the manufacture of an outsole 20 (Fig. 6) to provide the latter with jigging means, such as jig pins andjig holes or depressions, this object may be conveniently accomplished at the time a sole is cut from a sole blank or block sole 22 (Fig. 1) in a sole rounding machine (Fig. 3) by providing one of the patterns 24 (Fig. 2) of such machine with conical projections 26 so that when a sole blank 22 is clamped between the pattern member 24 and a cooperating clamp ing member 28, the projecting conical portions 26 of metal members 30 (Fig. 3) will produce corresponding conically shaped depressions in the adjacent surface of the sole 20, one of these depressions bein shown at 3| in Fig. 8. It follows that each and every sole which is rounded in the machine shown in Fig. 3 with the aid of the pattern 24 will be provided on its flesh or attaching surface with jigging depressions which will serve to locate, in properly jigged relation thereon, a

jig pin plate or plates such as those shown at 32 and 34 in Figs. 4, 5 and 6, these plates 32 and 34 serving to position jig pins 36 in proper rela tion to the forepart portion and the heel seat portion of the outsole, it being understood in this connection that the plates 32 and 34 are provided with conically shaped jigging projections 35 (Figs. 4 and 5) receivable in the jigging depressions formed in the outsole by the conical projections 26 of the pattern member 24. The plates 32 and 34 are preferably bonded to the outsole 20 by a suitable adhesive. A conically shapedjigging projection on the under surface of the plate 32 is shown in the sectional view of portionsof the outsole 20, an insole 31, and the jig plate.32 in Figs. 8 and 13 of the drawings. Fig. 8 also shows a jig pin 36 extending upwardly from the plate 32 into a jig hole or opening in the insole 31.

Assuming that the outsole member shown in Fig. 6=is of the proper size, it may be readily assembled with respect to the insole 31 on last 40 (Fig. '7) by engaging jig pins 36 on the plate 32 with jig holes 42 in the forepart of the insole and jig pin 36 on plate 34 with a slot 44 in the heel seat end of said insole 31, it being understood in this connection that the jig pins 36 on the plate 32 locate the forward end of the outsole both laterally and longitudinally with respect to the forepart of the insole 3! and. that the jig pin 36 On plate 34 locates the heel seat end of the outsole transversely with respect to the heel seat end of the insole by engagement with the-slot 44 in the latter, a slot being used in place of a round hole in order that the sole may be readily positioned on the insole despite the fact that it does not necessarily conform thereto especially in the shank portions of the insole." The slot 44 is, therefore, necessary to permit a certain amount of adjustment of the rear end of the outsole with respect to the corresponding parts of the insole in the preliminaries of positioning and attaching the outsole.

In place of the two plates 32 and 34 provided with outsole 20 in Fig. 6, an alternative construction shown in Figs. 9 and 10 possesses certain advantages. Here a flexible plate 50 for an outsole member 5| is provided with jig pins 52 in theforepart and jig pin 53 in the rear end thereof, and is extended to provide a shank portion 54 and a heel seat portion 56 which latter carries the jig pin 53. In this construction, the plate 50 may be provided with scale marks 58 to assist in locating the forward end of a metal shank 1 stiffener 59 according to the size and style of the shoe in which this outsole unit will be employed, it being understood in this connection that the rear or heel end of the sole shown in Figs. '9 and 10 is not completed or shaped for one size only but that such sole member 5i may be utilized for sizes ranging between 3 and 9. In this case, the final shaping of the heel end of the sole takes place after the sole is attached to the shoe. If desired, the rear end of the shank stiffener 59 may be bifurcated to engage the jig pin 53 at the heel seat end 56 of the jig plate to locate said shank stiffener in proper relation transversely of the outsole 5|. A filler member 60 may be positioned upon the jig pins 52 at the forward part of the plate 5|] to fill in the space on the forepart of the insole inside the lines of the inturned upper. When outsole member 5|, plate 50, shank stifiener 59, and filler 66 have been assembled with the aid of a bonding or adhesive material, as just described, they may be molded at one operation into an outsoleunit in which the jig pins 52 not only locate certain of the parts mentioned in proper position relatively to each other, but the said jig pins also serve to locate such a molded outsole unit with respect to an insole 31' and an upper 62 assembled upon a last member as shown in Fig. 7. A useful alternative construction is provided by bonding together and molding into a unit the plate 51!, the shank stiffener t and (if desired) the filler member 69. Such a jig plate unit may be made in lots, each lot being of a different size from the others according to the position of the shank stiffener, the selected position of the latter determining the size in the'given range of 3 to 9, inclusive.

If desired, the outsole shown in Fig. 6 as provided with jig pin plates in the forepart and heel seat ends thereof may have, in addition to said jig pins and plates, jigging indentations for locating a shank stiffener in both transverse and longitudinal relation upon said outsole. To provide such jigging indentations, the pattern member 24 (Fig. 2) may have marking knives IE5 secured to the same surface which carries the conically shaped jigging projections 26. t will be clear that the marking knives Hi will provide two parallel lines or depressions in the flesh or attaching surface of the outsole 2D for locating a shank stiffener on the outsole in transverse relation thereto. Furthermore, another marking knife 72 may be provided on the pattern member 24 to produce a line or depression on the flesh or attaching surface of the outsole as a H gage mark for the forward end of a shank stiffener, should it be desired to secure a shank stiffener to an outsole to make an outsole unit somewhat similar to that shown in Fig. 10. It is possible, for example, to provide a molded out-- sole unit similar to that shown in Fig. 10 but utilizing an outsole having the spaced jig plates 32 and 3d of Fig. 6, if the outsole be provided with the jigging lines or indentations for the location of a shank stiffener on said outsole preliminarily to a molding operation in which the shank stiffener would be attached to the outsole both by a binder and by molding pressure.

Whereas in the foregoing description of the shoe bottom parts, the outsole has been provided with jig pins for cooperation with jig holes in the insole, in locating the outsole in jigged relation to the insole, it will be understood that the jigging means may be rearranged so that the insole is provided with jig pins adapted to be received in correspondingly placed jig holes in an outsole member. Upon reference to Figs. 11 and 12, it will be observed that the insole is provided with a jig plate 82 having jig pins 84 and that these jig pins extend clear through the ,1

plate 82 to provide corresponding jig pins 85 for locating the plate 82 on the insole 80 by engaging corresponding jig holes in the latter. It will be understood, of course, that the jig pins 84 need not extend through the plate 32 since the construction of the plate 82 may be that of DIOVidiIlg jig pins extending from its opposite surface in predetermined relation to the insole and to the plate 82 without regard to continuity in the pins upon opposite surfaces of the plate. In Fig. 12, a heel seat jig pin 8! is carried by a separate plate 88. In order that an outsole member 30 may be readily located in jigged relation with respect to the insole 8D, the outsole is provided with jig holes 82 which extend only part way throu h the thickness of the outsole and with a slot 94 in the heel seat end thereof which extends entirely through the thickness of the outsole since this heel seat end will subsequently be covered by other parts of the shoe, including the heel. While as stated, the jig holes 92 extend only part way through the thickness of the outsole, having been made of suitable depth as by a drilling operation, it is of course possible to have them extend entirely through the thickness of the outsole. In the latter case, the jig pins 84 will be longer and of a material corresponding in wearing resistance to the substance of the outsole so that the outsole and the jig pins will wear away equally, thereby avoiding a condition which might be produced as a result of having pins of more wear-resisting quality projecting from the surface of a worn sole.

In assembling the outsole 80 (Fig. 11) upon the insole unit 83 including the jig plates 82 and 88 (Fig. 12) the said outsole 90 will be positioned by engaging the jig holes 92 with the jig pins 84, the heel seat end of the outsole being positioned transversely of the insole by engaging the slot- 94 therein with the jig pin 81' projecting from the plate 88 at the heel seat end of the insole.

The insole members shown in Figs. 7 and 12 may be provided with their jig openings in any suitable manner. However, for production of such insoles in quantity, a special machine may be used for making jig holes in proper locations in insoles, as disclosed in United States Letters Patent No. 2,257,132, granted September 30, 1941,

upon application of A. R. Schoenky. Furthermore, the insoles of Figs. 7 and 12 are located on their respective lasts by an operator as a preliminary to securing each insole in place on the last by means of an insole tacker such as that shown in United States Letters Patents Nos. 1,106,393 and 1,312,557, granted August 11, 1914, and August 12, 1919, respectively, on applications filed in the name of Fred L. MacKenzie.

For accuracy and speed in locating an insole on a last, the latter is preferably provided with depressible jig pins such as those shown at it and I!!! in Figs. 13 and 14. In this case, each jig pin N10 or IE]! is provided with a collar Hi2 fixed thereto to engage a spring I04 seated in a socket or pocket in a last 195, the socket being preferably lined with'a metal member or shell :05. Projecting from the other surface of the collar 32 isa pin or shaft 108 extending through the-spring I04 and having a head I It slidable in a socket of reduced size extendin in alinement with the larger sleeve-lined socket. It will be readily understood that the insole member 31 may be readily assembled with the last 185 by engaging the jig holes in the insole with the jig pins H35 and HH. These latter are long enough to project only part way through the thickness of the insole for a reason which will be evident as this description proceeds. It will be noted that jig pin Hill is stouter than pin ml, since pin IE0 is called upon to take the thrust of the toe lasting operation in which there is a marked tendency to shift the insole in a direction from front to rear of the last.

At its heel seat end the last I is provided with a heel seat pin I [2 which is fixed to the last. In this case, therefore, the jig hole in the heel seat end of the insole extends clear through the thickness of the latter, said pin H2 being of a length to serve as positioning means not only for the insole 31 but also for a shank stifiener H4 and an outsole member H6, the latter having a slot H8 in its heel seat end for engagement with the jig pin I I2.

In order that the outsole I I6 may be assembled in jigged relation to the insole 31 on the last I05, the said outsole I I 6 is provided at its forepart end with a jig plate I20 (Fig. 14) carrying jig pins I22, I24 for engagement with the corresponding jig holes in the insole 31. To facilitate this engagement it is necessary that the jig pins I00, IOI should not project clear to the surface of the insole but should stop short of such surface, as heretofore described. On the other hand, the jig pins I22, I24 should be of a length to engage and depress the jig pin I and IOI to a point such that the ends of the latter are even with the surface of the last bottom, as clearly shown in Fig. 14. It follOws then that th pins I22, I24 serve not only to locate the outsole in jigged relation to the insole but to depress the jig pins I00 and IOI so that they will not interfere with the operation of removing the completed shoe from the last. In thi construction of the last I05, there may be also provided a jig pin I26 (Fig. 13) in the vicinity of the ball line of the last for engagement with the insole 31, the arrangement being such that a jig pin I28 on the metal shank piece II4 engages in the jig hole in the insole correspondin to the jig pin I 26 to locate the shank stiffener, said jig pin I28 also depressing 'the jig pin I26 to the surface of the last bottom. In this construction, therefore, the depressible jig pins in the last bottom serve to locate the insole accurately in jigged relation to the last by engagement with jig holes in said insole, these jig holes serving also in cooperation with jig pins on the outsole to locate the outsole in jigged relation to the insole and to the last. Furthermore, by the provision of the jig pins shown in Fig. 13 a shank stiffener is located in jigged relation to the insole and also to the outsole by means of the stationary jig pin H2 and also by means of the depressible jig pin I26 which is adapted to be engaged by the jig pin I28 at the forward end of the shank stiffener II4. It may be desirable to utilize a filler member such as that shown at I2I (Fig. 13) in which case the jig plate I20 may be dispensed with and the jig pins I22 and I24 arranged to be carried by small independent plates, such as plate 34 in Figs. and 6 andplate 88 in Fig. 12, bonded to the outsole IIS by adhesive. It follows that all of the bottom parts of the shoe are assembled in properly jigged relation to each other.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. That improvement in shoemaking which consists in providin an insole, an outsole, and an upper having a lasting margin, one of said soles having a plurality of jig holes spaced inwardly with respect to the area to be engaged by the lasting margin of the upper when said parts are embodied in a shoe and the other sole having a corresponding number of jig pins arranged for engagement within said jig holes, assembling said upper with said insole upon a last, lasting the shoe and securing the lasting margin of the upper in overlasted position upon said insole only in locations spaced outwardly from said jig holes, laying said outsole over said lasting margin, and interengaging said jig pins and said jig holes thereby positioning the outsole in jigged relation to the insole and the upper while the last remains in the shoe.

2. That improvement in shoemaking which consists'in providing an insole, an outsole, and an upper -having a lasting margin, the insole having a plurality of jig holes spaced inwardly with respect to the area to be engaged by the lasting margin of the upper when said parts are embodied in a shoe and the outsole having a corresponding number of jig pins arranged for engagement within said jig holes, assembling saidupper with said insole upon a last, lasting the shoe and securing the lasting margin of the upper in overlasted position upon said insole. laying said outsole over said lasting margin, and interengaging said jig pins and said jig-holes thereby positioning the outsole in jigged relation to the insole and the upper.

3. In the manufacture of shoes. the method which comprises providing a plurality of interacting positioning means in relation to a last bottom and to an insole to locate the insole on said last bottom, providing jig holes in the insole, placing the insole in position on the last with said holes opening on the exposed surface of said insole, assembling upon the lasted insole an outsole having jig pins receivable in said jig holes, locating said pins Within said holes thereby positioning the outsole in jigged relation to the insole and to the last, and securing the outsole to the insole with the aid of said jig pins and holes.

4. In the manufacture of shoes, the method which comprises providing a plurality of interacting positioning means in relation to a last bot tom and to an insole to locate the insole on said last bottom, providing jig' holes in the insole in both the forepart and heel seat portions thereof, placing the insole in position on the last with said holes opening on the exposed surface of said insole, assembling with the lasted insole an outsole having jig pins in both the forepart and the heel seat end of the outsole for entry into corresponding .jig holes in the insole, and locating said pins within said holes thereby positioning the outsole in jigged relation to the insole and to the last.

5. In the manufacture of shoes, the method which comprises providing a plurality of interacting positioning means in relation to a last bottom and to an insole to locate the insole on said last bottom, placing the insole on the last with the aid of said interacting positioning means, providing an outsole and the exposed surface of the insole on the last with interacting jig holes and jig pins so that the outsole may be located in jigged relation to the insole and to the last, then assembling said outsole on said insole, and subsequently securing the outsole to said insole with the aid of said jig pins and holes.

6. In the manufacture of shoes, the method Which comprises providing a plurality of depressible jig pins in both the forepart and the heel seat portions of the bottom of a last, locating an insole having corresponding jig holes by engaging said pins in said holes, providing a member having pins receivable in the jig holes of the insole to locate said member in jigged relation to the insole, the last-mentioned pins being of a length to depress the jig pins of the last bottom to the level of such bottom, and assembling said member with the last and insole and thereby depressing said first-mentioned pins to free the insole therefrom.

'7. In the manufacture of shoes, the method which comprises providing a plurality of depressible jig pins in the bottom of a last, locating an insole having corresponding jig holes by 'engaging said pins in said holes, providing a shank stiffener having a jig pin receivable in one of the jig holes in the insole to locate the stiffener on the insole, said last-mentioned pin being of a length to depress one of said depressible pins to the level of the last bottom, and assembling said shank stiffener with the insole on the last and thereby depressing one of said first-mentioned tioning said outsole unit in proper jigged relation to an insole attached to a last and having jig holes therein, said outsole unit also having at its heel seat end an elongated opening for engagement with a jig pin at the heel seat end of the last.

9. A method of preparingan outsole unit which comprises providing the wooden pattern of a sole rounding machine with conical projections so that an outsole clamped in the machine for rounding operations, by which a sole is formed substantially in final shape, is at the same time provided with conical depressions in its attaching surface in predetermined relation to the forepart and the heel seat contours of the sole, providing a plate or insert having conical projections on one surface thereof to enter said conical depressions in the surface of the outsole for locating said plate on the outsole, said plate having jig pins on the other surface thereof to locate the outsole unit in jigged relation to a corresponding insole, and assembling said plate with the outsole.

10. A method of preparing an outsole unit which comprises providing the wooden pattern of a sole rounding machine with conical projections so that an outsole clamped in the machine for rounding operations, by which a sole is formed substantially in final shape, is at the same time provided with conical depressions in its attaching surface in predetermined relation to the forepart and the heel seat contours of the sole, providing a plate or insert having conical projections on one surface thereof to enter said conical depressions in the surface of the outsole for locating said plate on the outsole, said plate having jig pins on the other surface thereof to locate the outsole in jigged relation to a corresponding insole, assembling said plate with the outsole, and providing said outsole on its attaching surface with a jig pin plate at the heel seat end thereof, said plate having a conical projection for projection into a conical depression formed in said outsole at the time of the sole rounding operation, whereby said outsole is provided with jig pins in predetermined relation thereto in both the forepart and heel seat part thereof.

11. An outsole unit including an outsole having secured to its attaching surface a plate having jig pins projecting from its surface for engagement with corresponding jig holes in an insole, a filler member located on said plate by said jig pins, said plate having further a shank portion extending into the heel seat end of the outsole, said shank portion of the plate being substantially of the same width as a metal shank piece to be assembled therewith, and a metal shank piece located on the shank portion of the flexible plate in predetermined relation to the ball line of the outsole, said outsole, flexible plate, and shank piece being conformed to each other and bonded together, whereby there is provided an outsole unit ready for laying upon an insole in place on a last.

12. A method of making shoes which includes positioning an insole on a last by jig pins associated with the last and removably engaging corresponding jigholesin the forepart of the insole, securing the insole temporarily to the last, providing an outsole with jig pins extending from the attaching surface thereof, and locating the outsole on the insole and on the last by means of said outsole jig pins projecting into jig holes in the insole.

13. A method of making shoes which includes positioning an insole on a last by jig pins associated with the last and removably engaging corresponding jig holes in the forepart of the insole, securing the insole temporarily to the last, providing an outsole with jig pins extending from the attaching surface thereof, locating the outsole on the insole and on the last by means of said outsole ig pins projecting into jig holes in the insole, and finally providing said outsole with a jig pin in the heel seat end thereof and the insole with a corresponding elongated opening in its heel seat end whereby the outsole is positioned on the insole in jigged relation to both the forepart and heel seat portions of said insole.

14. In the manufacture of shoes, the method which comprises, providing a plurality of depressib-le jig pins in the bottom surface of a last, providing an insole with corresponding jig holes whereby the insole is located on the last by jig pins entered into said holes, and finally providing an outsole with jig pins projecting from the attaching surface thereof to enter the jig holes in the insole whereby the outsole is properly located with respect to the jigged insole, the jig pins on the outsole having the function also of depressing the last pins to the level of the last bottom thereby facilitating the subsequent removal of the substantially completed shoe from the last.

15. In the manufacture of shoes, the method which comprises, providing a plurality of depressible jig pins in the bottom surface of a last, said last having also a fixed jig pin in its heel seat portion, providing an insole with corresponding jig holes whereby the insole is located on the last by jig pins entered into said holes, providing a shank piece having a jig pin at one end and a slot at the other end whereby one end of said shank piece may be located by entering the jig pin into a jig hole in the insole, the other end of the shank piece being engageable with the fixed jig pin projecting through the insole at the heel seat end thereof, and finally providing an outsole with jig pins and a jig hole whereby said jig pins may be utilized to locate the outsole in jigged relation to the insole by entering said pins into the jig holes in the insole, the jig hole in the outsole being threaded upon the jig pin at the heel seat end of the last, whereby the insole, shank piece and outsole are all located in jigged relation to each other and to the bottom of the last.

16. In the manufacture of shoes, the method which comprise providing a last having jig pins depressibly mounted in its bottom surface in the forepart of the last and in the ball area thereof, and also a fixed jig pin in the heel seat end of the last, providing an insole having jig holes to engage said jig pins whereby the insole is properly located on the last, then assembling with the insole a shank piece having a jig pin to em gage the jig hole of the insole in the ballarea thereof and to depress the depressible jig pin in such areawhereby theforward end of the shank piece is properly located, the shank piece having a slot in its rear end to engage the fixed jig pin at the heel seat end of the last, and finally assembling with the insole and shank piece an outsole having applied to it attaching surface a member having jig pins projecting therefrom to engage in the jig holes in the forepart of the insole to locate the forepart of the outsole in proper relation thereto, said jig pins on the outsole also operating to depress the depressible jig pins to the level of the bottom of the last, said outsole also having a slot at it heel seat end to engage the fixed jig pin at the heel seat end of the last, whereby the insole, the shank piece and the outsole are all located successively in jigged relation to each other and to the last.

17. A jig plate unit comprising a flexible member carrying at its forepart a plurality of jig pins for entry into corresponding jig openings or holes in an insole, said flexible member being adapted to extend through the shankportions of an insole and outsole into the heel seat end jig pins for entry into corresponding jig openings or holes in an insole, said flexible member being adapted to extend through the shank portions of an insole and outsole into the heel seat end thereof and having atthe heel seat end a jigging means for cooperation with jigging means in the heel seat end of said insole, and a shank stifiener, said flexible member having further a scale in the ball region thereof for indicating the size position of the shank stifiener which will be located on said flexible member in the shank portion thereof with the aid of said scale, said flexible member and shank stiffener being conformed to each other and bonded together, and said scale also showing the size number of the completed jig plate unit.

19. A shoe including an insole, an outsole, an upper having a lasting margin, and a plate having jig pins projecting from its surface, one of said soles having a corresponding number of previously formed jig holes spaced inwardly with respect to the area engaged by the lasting margin of the upper and forwardly of the instep of the shoe, and the other sole having said jig pin plate bonded thereto with said jig pins engaged in said jig holes to hold the soles in jigged relation to each other, said relation being determined by the interengagement of the jig pins with the previously formed jig holes.

20. A shoe including an insole, an outsole, and an upper having a lasting margin, the insole having a plurality of previously formed jig holes spaced inwardly with respect to the area engaged by the lasting margin of the upper and forwardly of the instep of the shoe, and the outsole having a corresponding number of jig pins secured thereto and engaging in said jig holes to hold the soles in relation to each other, said relation being determined by the entering of the jig pins into the previously formed jig holes.

LEE HAROLD CUSHMAN.

Référencé par
Brevet citant Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
US2467388 *30 nov. 194619 avr. 1949Simon Kamborian JacobMethod of stiffening the toe portion of shoes
US2558317 *18 nov. 194626 juin 1951Schwartz Russell PlatoShank piece for shoes
US3186113 *30 août 19621 juin 1965United Shoe Machinery CorpAttachment of shoe insoles to lasts
US4420894 *19 avr. 198220 déc. 1983Joel GlassmanSnap shoe
US8393028 *23 avr. 200912 mars 2013Nike, Inc.Method of manufacturing footwear having sipes
US20100269271 *23 avr. 200928 oct. 2010Namkook KimMethod of Manufacturing Footwear Having Sipes
Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis36/19.5, 12/146.0BP, 36/30.00A, 12/103, 12/141, 12/142.00F, 36/171, 12/128.00D, 36/76.00R, 36/22.00R
Classification internationaleA43D11/00
Classification coopérativeA43D11/006
Classification européenneA43D11/00B