Recherche Images Maps Play YouTube Actualités Gmail Drive Plus »
Connexion
Les utilisateurs de lecteurs d'écran peuvent cliquer sur ce lien pour activer le mode d'accessibilité. Celui-ci propose les mêmes fonctionnalités principales, mais il est optimisé pour votre lecteur d'écran.

Brevets

  1. Recherche avancée dans les brevets
Numéro de publicationUS2502545 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication4 avr. 1950
Date de dépôt19 août 1946
Date de priorité19 août 1946
Numéro de publicationUS 2502545 A, US 2502545A, US-A-2502545, US2502545 A, US2502545A
InventeursWellborn Starnes R
Cessionnaire d'origineWellborn Starnes R
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Cigarette filter tip
US 2502545 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

April 1950. s. R. WELLBORN Y 7 ,5

CIGARETTE FILTER TIP Filed Aug. 19, 1946 INVENTOR. 57l/2/VE6 ,e. WELLBOE/V Patented Apr. 4, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT orrica- CIGARETTE FILTER TIP Starnes R. Wellborn, Nashville, Tenn. Application August 19, 1946, Serial No. 691,442

Claims. 1

This invention relates to a filter tip for cigarettes and has for one of its objects the production of a filter tip which will produce a cooler smoke involving the virtues of a long cigarette holder, while at the same time avoiding the inconvenience of using such a cumbersome device.

A further object of this invention is the proluction of a filter tip which will reduce to a minimum tobacco stain upon the smokers teeth and prevent tobacco particles from contacting the teeth of thesmoker.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will appear throughout the following specification and claims.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the tip, with the top half of the roll out diagonally away through the center, for the purpose of illustrating the improved center closure. .7

Figure 2 is a perspective view of a portion of the corrugated strip, and the companion strip, located at the end of the roll and at the circumference.

Figure 3 is an end view of the completely rolled tip illustrating the circuitous smoke passage and center closure, the endwhich lies adjacent the tobacco in the cigarette being shown, and the strips of paper being indicated by a single line to avoid cumbersome illustration.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary end elevational view of the folded portion which provides the center closure.

Figure 5 is a perspective view of the tip in the process of being rolled by means of tweezers, or other instrument, each layer of paper being indicated by a single line.

Figure 6 is an edge elevational view of a modifled form wherein the outer and the inner corrugated strips are formed from one continuous strip of paper.

By referring to the drawing, it will be seen that l designates the transverse corrugations which extend in a continuous uninterrupted pattern throughout the principal portion of the strip I, but gradually diminished at both ends as at 2 and 3 to the same flatness as the companion strip 6. (See Figures 2 and 3 of the drawing.) This is necessary so that no direct air passage will exist at the ends of the strips.

As shown in Figures 1 and 4, the centrally located fiat end 3 of the corrugated strip and the companion strip are provided with about one half of the width folded fiat once over as at 4. The remaining width of that portion which has not been folded will naturally assume a round shape 2 in cross section as at 5, upon which the strips of material, paper and the like, will roll. The flat fold 4 of the core, formed by portions 4 and 5, will block the direct passage of air through the center of the roll, thus forming a self-contained closure of the tip.

As shown in Figure 4, the combined strips which form the closure at 4, fit fiat one against the other at the start of the process of rolling. Because of the flattened portion 4 of the core being of greater width than the diameter of the rounded portion 5, it will be found upon completion of the roll, that the flat portion 4 will be compressed in such a manner to form a bowed or substantially shaped formationnote Figure 3.

If desired an adhesive material 55 may be used and applied to the inner surfaces of the flat fold t to secure the faces together.

As shown in Figure 2, and beginning at the line of fragmentation, the transverse corrugation i, whichis of a serpentine formation, travels in continuous approach to within the terminal area indicated by the dotted line 9-9. The terminal area is located adjacent the tobacco when rolled within a cigarette and is located near the periphery of the roll as shown in Figure 3. By following the arrows shown in dotted lines in Figure 2, through the corrugations, the open air and smoke passages may be traced. Smoke and air travel along the line of least resistance and therefore, normally the smoke will only be drawn into the corrugated passageway through the first entrance i0. Should however this entrance become ineffective because of its being clogged with tobacco muck or tobacco particles, the second entrance will then become the most direct passageway and will perform the same function as did the first passageway or entrance iii. Should the second entrance H become ineffective, the third entrance i2 will then perform the same function, and so on, using as many such entrances i3 and I4 in the terminal areas as desired, with the eventual diminishing of the corrugations to the end of the strip. The extreme outer end of the companion strip will hold the roll in firm rolled shape by use of an adhesive at H- as shown in Figure 3.

From the foregoing description it should be noted that I have produced a filter tip for cigarettes having a self-contained center closure within the roll of corrugated paper, together with an intermediate companion strip of flat paper, and wherein the center closure comprises a component part of the two paper strips. Furthermore, it should be noted that an efilcient terminal area of the, circuitous passaged paper strip has been provided, for the purpose oi insuring an unobstructed passage of cigarette smoke, especially when the corrugations are made very small in size.

It will be noted further by considering Figure 2, that the passages I 6 to 20 are provided with communicating passages 2| intermediate the ends thereof to provide alternate smoke inlets should one inlet become stopped, and at the same time providing the continuous passage or communica tion between the corrugations at a point inset from the entrance openings In to H inclusive.

As shown in Figure 6, the outer strip 22 and the inner corrugated strip 23 are formed from a continuous strip of paper being folded back upon themselves as at 24. The folded end as at 24 is the end which forms the self-contained center closure, and the sealing adhesive 25 is applied to the opposite end similar to the adhesive l shown in Figure 2.

By noting Figure 2, the direction of travel of the smoke should be understood, the outlet passage 28 leading to the smoker's mouth indicated at one end of the strip and the inlet passages from the cigarette being indicated ID to it inclusive.

The present invention is an improvement upon my previous application Serial Number 573,553, filed January 19, 1945,- now Patent No. 2,462,446. and relating to a Built-in circuitous smoke passage.

What is claimed is:

1. A cigarette filter tip comprising an outer sheet of material and an inner sheet of material in the form of a roll, one sheet having serpentine circuitous corrugations extending substantially throughout the length of the sheet to provide a lengthy smoke passage having a smoke inlet passage near the periphery of the tip leading from a cigarette, and a smoke outlet passage near the center ,of the tip leading to the mouth of the smoker, the inner ends of the sheets of said roll providing a central core having a closed end to provide a self -contained center closure.

2. A cigarette filter tip comprising an outer sheet of material and an inner sheet of material rolled together, one sheet having serpentine circuitous corrugations extending substantially throughout the length of the sheet to provide a lengthy smoke passage having a smoke inlet passage near the periphery of the tip leading from a cigarette, and a smoke outlet passage near the center of the tip leading to the mouth of the smoker, the inner ends of the sheets when rolled providing a central core having a folded compressed and flattened end to provide a self-contained center closure.

3. A cigarette 'filter tip comprising an outer sheet of material and an integral inner sheet 0! material, the inner sheet having serpentine circuitous corrugations extending transversely thereof and substantially throughout-the length of the sheet to provide a lengthy smoke passage having a smoke outlet passage near the center of the tip, and a series of the corrugations near one end of the last mentioned sheet having open ends providing a plurality of smoke inlet passages adiacent a cigarette and located near the periphery of the tip, said last mentioned series of corrugations having communicating passages inset from the open ends to insure a free intake of smoke through the corrugations should one of the said openings become clogged.

4. A cigarette filter tip comprising an outer sheet of material and an integral inner sheet of material in the form of a roll, one sheet having serpentine circuitous corrugations extending substantially throughout the length of the sheet to provide a lengthy smoke passage having a smoke inlet passage near the periphery of the tip leading from a cigarette, and a smoke outlet passage near the center of the tip leading to the mouth of the smoker, the inner ends of the sheets when rolled providing a central core having a flattened end to provide a self-contained center closure.

5'. A cigarette filter tip comprising a sheet'of material in the form of a roll having an inner and an outer end, said sheet-having a lengthy serpentine circuitous smoke passage extending substantially throughout the length of the sheet, said sheet also having a smoke inlet passage leading from the cigarette and communicating with the circuitous passage, and having a smoke outlet passage leading to the mouth of the smoker and communicating with the circuitous passage, the inner end of the sheet of the roll providing a central core having a closed end to provide a selfcontained closure.

STARNES R. WELLBORN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Citations de brevets
Brevet cité Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
US973890 *2 sept. 190925 oct. 1910John W SurbrugMouthpiece for cigarettes and the like.
US1476955 *23 janv. 192211 déc. 1923Pars William M DeTobacco pipe
US1967586 *8 juil. 193324 juil. 1934Minton Paul HAbsorbent filter for smoking appliances
Référencé par
Brevet citant Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
US2599604 *13 juil. 194910 juin 1952Jordan V BauerFilter element
US2866465 *22 mars 195430 déc. 1958Cigarette Components LtdPaper tubes
US2869858 *1 août 195620 janv. 1959Metal Textile CorpVibration and shock absorptive cushion element
US2916038 *23 févr. 19548 déc. 1959American Viscose CorpTobacco smoke filter
US3025963 *13 mars 195820 mars 1962Richard L JohnstonProducts useful as filtering devices and methods of making them
US3149941 *30 déc. 195722 sept. 1964Cons Electrodynamics CorpChromatography apparatus
US3319793 *8 juin 196516 mai 1967Joseph B MasaschiCord wound filter element
US3346121 *13 août 196510 oct. 1967Corning Glass WorksFilter and method for its production
US3480149 *8 mars 196725 nov. 1969Gen Motors CorpFlat casing filter device
US5435870 *16 juin 199325 juil. 1995Ipics CorporationFilter element and manufacture method thereof
US5543007 *6 avr. 19956 août 1996Nippondenso Co. Ltd.Filter element manufacturing method
US5896860 *3 déc. 199727 avr. 1999Lockett; Wilson IraSmoking filter
US634808510 nov. 199919 févr. 2002Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter arrangement and methods
US636837413 juin 20009 avr. 2002Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter arrangement and methods
US65175986 juin 200111 févr. 2003Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter element having flange and methods
US653384515 févr. 200218 mars 2003Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter arrangement and methods
US659934415 févr. 200229 juil. 2003Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter arrangement and methods
US66101266 juin 200126 août 2003Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter element having sealing members and methods
US685214128 mai 20028 févr. 2005Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter element having center piece and methods
US687819022 août 200312 avr. 2005Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter element having sealing members and methods
US69602455 mars 20031 nov. 2005Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter arrangement and methods
US699474422 juil. 20047 févr. 2006Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter arrangement and methods
US699796824 août 200414 févr. 2006Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter element having sealing members and methods
US70485001 mars 200423 mai 2006Donaldson Company, Inc.Silencer for ventilation system and methods
US72527043 févr. 20067 août 2007Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter arrangement and methods
US729717330 nov. 200420 nov. 2007Donaldson Company, Inc.Gas turbine air intake system with bypass arrangement and methods
US73933751 févr. 20061 juil. 2008Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter element having sealing members and methods
US769116625 juin 20086 avr. 2010Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter element having sealing members and methods
US79766015 avr. 201012 juil. 2011Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter element having sealing members and methods
US808382527 févr. 200627 déc. 2011Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter arrangement and method
US824670711 juil. 201121 août 2012Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter element having sealing members and methods
US860881820 août 201217 déc. 2013Donaldson Company, Inc.Filter element having sealing members and methods
DE102008026552A1 *3 juin 200810 déc. 2009Marco Systemanalyse Und Entwicklung GmbhFilter for cleaning hydraulic fluid, has winding strip used as filtering material, where winding strip is made of wire mesh, wound to dual Fermat's spirals and provided with cylindrical peripheral contour
Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis131/339, 55/498, 210/487, 210/494.1, 55/521, 55/520
Classification internationaleA24D3/04, A24D3/00
Classification coopérativeA24D3/045
Classification européenneA24D3/04C