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Numéro de publicationUS3199136 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication10 août 1965
Date de dépôt8 sept. 1964
Date de priorité8 sept. 1964
Numéro de publicationUS 3199136 A, US 3199136A, US-A-3199136, US3199136 A, US3199136A
InventeursGeorge Philip F
Cessionnaire d'origineGeorge Philip F
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Mop having disposable sheets
US 3199136 A
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Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

Aug. 10, 1965 F. GEORGE 3,199,136

MOP HAVING DISPOSABLE SHEETS Original Filed May 28, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 PHILIP F. GEORGE INVENTOR.

Aug. 10, 1965 F, GEORGE 3,199,136

MOP HAVING DISPOSABLE SHEETS I Original Filed May 28, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 f INVENTOR PHILI P F. GEORGE United States Patent arsena s Ill 1 33i HAVENG DHSPUSABLE SHEETS Philip F. George, 2 Dartmouth St., Worcester, Mass. Continuation of application Ser. No. 198,059, May 28, 1962. This application Sept. 8, 31964, Ser. No. 396,467 2 Claims. or. 15-231 This is a continuation of my co-pending patent application Serial Number 198,059, filed May 28, 1962, now abandoned.

This invention relates to a mop having disposable sheets and, more particularly, to apparatus arranged to facilitate the removal of dirt from fioors and other broad surfaces.

It is common practice to clean floors by using a mo; in conjunction with a plurality of receptacles, one receptacle containing a soap-and-water solution and the other a clear Water solution for rinsing. The mop is dipped into the soapand-water solution and applied to the floor to loosen and remove the dirt. When the mop is agai inserted into the receptacle containing the soap-and-water solution, the mop carries dirt into the solution and in a short while the solution becomes dirty so that it is necessary to throw it away and to replace it with clean cleaning fluid. Even when the cleaning solution is first used, the small amount of dirt released by the first mop insertion means that the floor is being was red with a suspension of dirt and the floor is dulled by the thin layer of dirt which remains when the floor dries. In the same way, if the mop is inserted in the rinsing solution, dirt is carried into the rinsing solution so that it must be disposed of at fairly frequent intervals. Even when a separate mop is used with the rinsing solution, the mop picks up dirt from the floor and releases it into the solution so that the rinsing solution must be replaced frequently. Not only is it time-consuming to replace the cleaning fluid, as well as the rinsing fluid, but such frequent replacement is expensive, since the detergent or soap is thrown away with the cleaning fluid and, if hot water is used in both the cleaning fluid and the rinsing fluid, the use of large amounts of hot water in an institution, such as a hospital, adds considerably to the cost of maintaining the institution. These and other diificulties experienced with the prior art apparatus and practice have been obviated in a novel manner by the present invention.

It is, therefore, an outstanding object of the invention to provide a mop having disposable sheets which will permit the use of a cleaning fluid or a rinsing fluid for an indefinite period of time.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a mop having disposable sheets on which the dirt is retained on a disposable element and is not introduced into the cleaning fluid.

A further object of the present invention is the provision of a mop having disposable sheets which is portable and which will permit the cleaning of floors and the like for long periods of time without replacement or disposal of the cleaning fluids.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a mop having disposable sheets in which the cleaning fluid and the rinsing fluid do not get dirty so that cleaning may take place for a long period of time for great distances from the source of water and other cleaning materials.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a mop whose head is provided with a plural-layer, disposable cover, wherein the cover may be removed readily to expose a clean surface when desirable.

A. still further object of this invention is the provision of a disposable mop cover consisting of a plurality of thicknesses of absorbent material which may be readily removed, a sheet at a time, to expose clean surface.

ice

Another obiect of the invention is the provision of apparatus for washing floors in such a manner that a thin layer of dirt does not remain on the floor when the water dries.

With these and other objects in View, as will be apparent to those skilled in the art, the invention resides in the combination of parts set forth in the specification and covered by the claims appended hereto.

The character of the invention, however, may be best understood by reference to certain of its structural forms, as illustrated by the accompanying drawings in which:

FEG. l is a perspective view of cleaning apparatus embodying the principles of the present invention,

FIG. 2 is an elevational view of a mop forming the present invention,

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a disposable cover used with the mop,

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of the cover taken on the line IV- i-i of PEG. 3,

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of a mop forming part of the apparatus,

FIG. 6 is a plan view of the mop,

FIG. '7 is a plan view of a cart forming part of the apparatus,

Referring first to FIG. 1, wherein are best shown the PEG. 8 is a vertical sectional view of the cart taken on the line VlllVlll of FIG. 7,

FIG. 9 is a perspective view showing a rack forming part of the apparatus and used on a receptacle,

PEG. 10 is a vertica sectional view of the rack taken on the line -X of PK}. 9, and

FIG. 11 is a generally-horizontal sectional view of the rack taken on the line XlXI of FIG. 9.

Referring first to HQ. 1, wherein are best shown the general features of the device, the cleaning apparatus, indicated generally by the reference numeral id, is shown as consisting of a cart ill on which are mounted three receptacles, l2, l5, and 2M. 6n top of the receptacle 13 is mounted a rack 15 carrying a mop l6. On the receptacle i4 is carried a rack 1'7 carrying a mop 18.

Referring to FIG. 2, it can be seen that the mop 16 consists of a handle 19 having at one end a head 21 around which is wrapped a cover 22..

In FlGS. 3 and 4 it can be seen that the cover 22 consists of a plurality of sheets 22, 23, 2 Z5, Z6, and The outer; .ost sheet 22. is typical of the rest. The sheet is provided with a large rectangular main body 28 formed of an absorptive paper material selected to have high wet strength and capable of permitting the flow of fluid therethrough while retaining dirt contained in the fluid. Extending from one side of the main body are two rectangular fingers 2% and 31, which are spaced apart a substantial distance. The finger 2 is provided with a tab 32 located adiacent the juncture of the finger to the main body, while the finger 31 is similarly provided with a tab 33. The tabs 32 and 33 are elongated members of considerable strength and extend laterally from the fingers a substantial distance. Each tab is cemented or otherwise fastened to its linger in such a manner that pulling strongly on the tab results in a tearing of the sheet or finger material rather than the separation of the tab from the material. All of the other sheets 23, 25, 2d, and 27 are similarly provided with fingers and tabs. All of the fingers underlying the finger 2?) are fastened together by a staple 34, while a similar staple joins all of the fingers underlying the finger 31. The staples 34 and 35 are the sole means joining the various sheets together into a unitary cover.

Referring now to FIGS. 5 and 6, which show the details of the mop it, it can be seen that the head 21 is provided with a rectangular steel plate 36 to the upper surface of which is attached a fitting 37. The handle 19 fits into a ferrule on the fitting and is locked in place by a fastener 41. Underlying the plate as are two blocks 42 and 43 formed or" a sponge-lire material which may be either a natural or an artificial sponge. This mate rial is capable of absorbing large amounts of fluid. The block d2 is cemented in a sheet steel cap 34 which is fastened to the plate 36 by screws 33 and Similarly, the block 43 is cemented in a cap 45 which is also attached by screws to the plate 36. Overlying the block 43 is a clamp 46 consisting of a first arm 47 whose free end is fastened between the plate 3-6 and the cap and held in place by the pressure of the screws which hold these two members together. The clamp is also provided with another arm 48, these two arms being biased into clamping relationship by a tubular spring 49. Overlying the block 42 are two clamps i and 52. which are exactly alike. The clamp 52 is provided with one arm 53 which is held between the plate 36 and the cap 4% by the screws which hold these members together. The clamp is provided with another arm 5 which extends upwardly at an angle to the arm 53, the arms being held in resilient clamping condition by a tubular spring 55. The clamp 51 is similarly fastened to the head 21. In FIG. 6 it can be seen that the clamp 46 is located centrally of the side of the plate 35 from which it extends, while the clamps 51 and 52. are spaced, the space being tie same as the distance between the fingers 29 and 31 of the cover 22.

FIGS. 7 and 8 show the details of the cart ill. The cart consists of a main body consisting of a square piece of fiat material. Extending around the main body 56 is a raised rim 57 having an upper edge extending a short distance above the upper surface 55 of the main body 56. The upper surface is provided with a raised rim 59 adapted to receive the receptacle 3; a raised rim 61 adapted to receive the receptacle 14; and a raised rim 62 adapted to receive the receptacle 12. The rims 59 and 61 are circular to match their receptacles which are shown as metal pails, while the rim Q32 is somewhat rectangular with rounded corners to match the receptacle 12 which is shown as a plastic waste basket. Extending from the underside of the main body 56 are three casters 63, 64, and 65. Mounted on the upper surface of the main body 56 is a thermostat element 66 from which extends an electrical cord 67 terminating in a plug 68. Also extending from the thermostatic element 65 are heating elements 69 and 71. The heating element 69 is embedded in the main body within the rim 59, while the heating element 71 is embedded in the main body within the rim 61.

FIGS. 9, 10, and 11 show the details of the rack 15. The rack consists of a wire basket 72 which opens upwardly and tapers inwardly somewhat in the downward direction. The basket is provided with a generally rectangular upper loop 73 and a spaced parallel lower loop 74, the latter being adapted to rest on the rim of the receptacle 13. The loops 73 and 74 are joined by other wire members which extend downwardly and then inwardly to form the bottom of the basket. One corner of the loop 74 is provided with a clamp 75, while an adjacent corner of the loop 74 is provided with a similar clamp 76. The side of the loop 72 opposite the corners of the basket which are provided with the clamps 75 and 76 is provided with a horizontal loop 77. Through this loop extends the lower end of an elongated supporting arm 78, the arm extending between the upper loop 73 and the lower loop 74 and being wedged between bottom wire elements of the basket. The outer end of the arm is provided with a downwardly-turned handle portion 79 and adjacent the handle portion is a clip In FIG. it can be seen that the clamp 76 is provided with two arms 32 and 63 which are held in biased condition by a tubular spring 84 so that they clamp a beaded rim 85 of the receptacle 13. A fastener 86 extends across the outer ends of the arms 82 and 83 and traps the wire loop 74 of the basket. The clamps 75 and 76, therefore, act

on the rack R5 as hinges, holding it in place over the top of the receptacle yet permitting it to be moved about a hinge line away from the receptacle to permit the mop to be inserted.

FIG. 11 shows that the clip til is held on the arm '78 by a fastener 87 and is of an angular configuration suitable for clamping and holding the handle 19 of the mop in the manner shown.

The operation of the cleaning apparatus will now be readily understood in view of the above description. In order to clean the floor, a cleaning fluid is placed in the receptacle 13. This cleaning fluid may consist of a soapand-water solution or a solution of a detergent with water, which water would probably be hot. The receptacle 14 is partially filled with hot clean water which will be used for rinsing. The receptacle i2 is used to receive a sheet removed from the disposable cover 22; this sheet carrying dirt is disposed of by placing in the receptacle 12. With the racks 15 and 17 in place on the receptacles 13 and M and with the mops l6 and iii in place on the racks, the entire assemblage may be moved over the floor by grasping the handles of the mops and using them for steering and pushing. As the operator proceeds down a corridor, for instance, he will stop to clean a given area of floor. First of all, he will grasp the mop 16 and r move it from the rack 15. Then, by grasping the handle 79 of the supporting arm 72 of the rack 15, the rack will be hingedly moved about the clamps and 76 to a position away from the top of the receptacle. The mop i6 is then inserted in the cleaning fluid in the receptacle l3 and is wetted. Then, the rack is returned to operative position and the mop is pressed lightly in the rack to remove excess lluid. The mop is applied to the floor and moved around to loosen the dirt. The sponge-like blocks 42 and 43 have been filled with cleaning fluid, but the fluid is free to pass outwardly through the cover 22, since it is formed or" absorptive paper material. The mop is pressed on the floor, thus releasing the cleaning fluid from the blocks 42 and 43. After a small area of the floor has been thus cleaned, the rack is returned to its original position with the loop 74 resting on the rim of the receptacle 13. The mop is placed in the basket with the head in the basket and the handle in the clip 81. Before the mop 16 is returned to the rack, however, a layer of the disposable cover 22 is removed and placed in the receptacle 12. The mop (which now has no dirt in it) is returned to the rack 15 and pressed downwardly so that the cleaning fluid is returned to the receptacle 13. Then, the handle of the mop is placed in the clip 81. Then, the operator removes the other mop 18 from its rack 17 and rotates the rack about its hinge clamps so that the rinsing fluid receptacle 14 is exposed. The mop is inserted in the rinsing fluid so that the sponge-like blocks making up the head absorb a quantity. Then, the rack is returned and the mop pressed in the bask t to remove excess fluid. The area of the floor which has previously been cleaned with cleaning fluid is rinsed with the rinsing fluid. Before the mop is returned to the rack the operator removes the outer layer of the disposable cover 22. Thereafter, the mop head is placed in the rack 17 and pressed downwardly so that the rinsing fluid returns to the receptacle 14. Then, the handle of the mop is placed in the clip of the rack 17 and held in place.

If the floor still carries some moisture, it may be dried by making use of the mop 18 to absorb any remaining moisture. The outer layer of the disposable cover is always removed so that the dirt is no longer associated with the mop. The layer of cover is placed in the receptacle 12; the mop is returned to the rack 17, pressed downwardly against the bottom of the basket to return the fluid to the receptacle M, and then is clipped in place on the supporting arm of the rack.

If desired, as the operator moves the cart 11 and the rest of the cleaning apparatus along the corridor from one place to another, he may also insert the plug 68 in one of the electrical receptacles which, as is usual practice, is placed at convenient intervals in rooms and along corridors. In this way, with the thermostat 66 set for a predetermined temperature, the coil 69 maintains the cleaning fluid in the receptacle 13 hot, while the heating coil 71 keeps the rinsing fluid in receptacle 14 hot. Since the fluid which is squeezed out of the blocks 42 and 43 by pressure of the mop 16 on the bottom of the basket '7 2 passes outwardly through a disposable cover 22 which has no dirt on it (since the layer of dirt has been removed by the removal of the outermost sheet), the cleaning fluid in the receptacle 13 never gets dirty. In the same way, the rinsing fluid in the receptacle 14 never gets dirty. Since it is not necesasry to replace the cleaning fluid or the rinsing fluid, it is desirable to keep it hot and the coils 69 and 71 accomplish this purpose.

In order to remove a layer from the disposable cover 22, the operator picks up the mop, grasps the tab 32, and tears it across the finger 29. The portion of the outer sheet 22 through which the staple 34 passes remains behind with the rest of the cover. Then, he tears the tab 33in a similar manner, thus dividing the finger 31. In this condition the sheet 22 is only held along its opposite edge by the clamp 46. At that time, the operator tears the sheet from the clamp 46, leaving a small portion of the paper behind. This means that the sheet 23 is now the outermost sheet of the cover 22 and is clean, since the sheet 22' (which carried all the dirt) has been removed and dropped in the receptacle 12.

As the work progresses, it may be necessary because of the removal of sheets to place a new cover 22 on the head of the mop. For this purpose, the fingers 29 and 31 of the new cover may be clamped in the clamps 51 and 52, respectively. The sheets of the entire cover are loose except for the parts which are held together by the staples 34 and 35; these sheets are stretched across the bottoms of the blocks 42 and 43 and the opposite edges are clamped in the clamp 46. It should be noted that, in removing the outer layer or sheet from the disposable cover 22, it is not necessary for the operator to touch a portion of the sheet which is covered with dirt. Normally, the dirt would be in the center portion of the main body 28 of any given sheet. The outer edges of that main body, including the fingers 29 and 31, would be free of such dirt, although, of course, they might contain cleaning and rinsing fluid.

It can be seen then, that, since it is not necessary to replace the cleaning fluid in the receptacle 13, a considerable saving will be experienced because of the fact that much less soap or detergent will be used. In the case of both fluids, the use of hot water is substantially reduced which, in the case of a large institution, means a great saving in cost of operation. The major saving, of course, is in labor, since the operator may continuously perform the cleaning operation on the floor without returning (as is the usual case) to a sink at one end of the corridor. In other words, he may progress continuously along a corridor and through a building without the necessity of returning to the point where his hot water and supplies are located. This is particularly'true if the heating elements as and 71 are used, so that the cleaning fluid and the rinsing fluid are maintained in a hot condition.

One interesting benefit of the present invention is that the sponge blocks 42 and 43 are not subjected to wear. In cleaning floors, the abrasive nature of the floor is quite considerable and the sponges wear out, not so much from the contact with cleaning fluid but mainly because of the mechanical abrasive action on the floor on the sponge-like material. In the present case, the abrasive action is provided by the disposable paper sheets and, if desired, the sheets may be treated or impregnated to increase this abrasive quality so that they clean the floor better. However, the normal absorptive paper material usually has fibres which are adequate to act in an abrasive manner when used for cleaning. Since a new sheet of material is continuously being presented in accordance with the practice of the present invention, these abrasive fibres will not have an opportunity to be worn down before a sheet is disposed of, so that the cleaning should take place in a very effective manner.

It should be understood that the mop with its disposable cover may be used as a dust mop, by applying a spraytype cleaning compound.

It is obvious that minor changes may be made in the form and construction of the invention without departing from the material spirit thereof. It is not, however, desired to confine the invention to the exact form herein shown and described, but it is desired to include all such as properly come within the scope claimed.

The invention having been thus described, what is claimed as new and desired to secure by Letters Patent is:

it. Cleaning apparatus, comprising (a) a mop having an elongated handle and a head,

(b) a substantial body of material capable of absorbing and holding large quantities of fluid secured to the head,

(c) clamping means associated with the head,

((1) a cover substantially surrounding the said body and held in place by the said clamping means, the cover consisting of a plurality of layers of paper having high wet strength and capable of passing fluid but not passing dirt contained therein,

(e) localized means for retaining the sheets together until such time as it is desired to remove a layer, each layer being formed with at least one finger by which it is grasped by the said clamping means, and

(f) a tab extending from the intermediate portion of each finger to aid in removal of a layer.

2. Cleaning apparatus, comprising (a) a cover adapted substantially to surround a body of a mop and to be held in place by a clamping means, the cover consisting of a plurality of layers of paper having high Wet strength and capable of passing fluid but not passing dirt contained therein,

(b) localized means for retaining the sheets together until such time as it is desired to remove a layer, each layer being formed with at least one finger by which it is grasped by the said clamping means,

(0) and a tab extending from the intermediate portion of each finger to aid in removal of a layer.

No references cited.

CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner.

Citations hors brevets
Référence
1 *None
Référencé par
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Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis15/231, 219/433, 15/247, 219/386, 15/118, 392/441, 219/217, 15/228, 15/260
Classification internationaleA47L13/58, A47L13/20, A47L13/256, A47L13/10
Classification coopérativeA47L13/58, A47L13/20, A47L13/256
Classification européenneA47L13/256, A47L13/58, A47L13/20