Recherche Images Maps Play YouTube Actualités Gmail Drive Plus »
Connexion
Les utilisateurs de lecteurs d'écran peuvent cliquer sur ce lien pour activer le mode d'accessibilité. Celui-ci propose les mêmes fonctionnalités principales, mais il est optimisé pour votre lecteur d'écran.

Brevets

  1. Recherche avancée dans les brevets
Numéro de publicationUS3200518 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication17 août 1965
Date de dépôt18 mars 1964
Date de priorité18 mars 1964
Numéro de publicationUS 3200518 A, US 3200518A, US-A-3200518, US3200518 A, US3200518A
InventeursRasmussen Richard E
Cessionnaire d'origineDon R Rasmussen, Rasmussen Richard E
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
French heel structure
US 3200518 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

Aug. 17, 1965 R. E. RASMUSSEN 3,200,513

FRENCH HEEL STRUCTURE Filed March 18, 19 64 FIG. I 22 1 FIG. 2

FIG. 4

INVENTOR. RICHARD E. RAsMUsSEN ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,200,518 FRENCH HEEL STRUCTURE Richard E. Rasmussen, Grosse Pointe Park, Mich,

assignor, by mesne assignments, to Richard E. Rasmussen and Don R. Rasmussen, Lafayette,

California Filed Mar. 18, 1964, Ser. No. 352,926 4 Claims. (Cl. 36-34) This invention relates to French heels for ladies shoes. Such heels range up to heights of 3" or more and, top to bottom, taper to a small diameter, usually less than /2", at the ground-engaging wear tab.

Shoes with French heels are notoriously unstable, and the wearer runs a substantial risk of injury through turned ankles, falling down, and the like. It is a familiar sight to see the wearers ankles wobble in an unsightly and precarious manner. Frequently, the wearer feels uncomfortably insecure in her high heeled shoes.

With the extremely small diametered heels and wear tabs presently in vogue, French heels cause denting and other damage to many types of flooring in homes, public buildings, and vehicles, particularly aircraft, where heels have been known to punch holes in the aluminum decking.

The object of the present invention is to provide a simple, inexpensive French heel structure improved to eliminate or greatly reduce the above hazards and disadvantages while, in general, retaining the graceful, delicate appearance of the conventional French heel.

The invention generally contemplates the use of a stabilizing member at the lower end of the French heel, this member having two laterally spaced wear surfaces which cooperate with the toe of the shoe to provide a three-area support for the wearers foot. The stabilizing member is adapted for use both in original manufacture of a shoe and as a replacement for the conventional wear tab.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary generally side elevational view of a shoe utilizing the present invention, parts being shown in phantom to illustrate structure.

FIG. 2 is a rear, generally elevational view of the shoe in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a generally elevational view of a stabilizing member separate from other parts of the heel.

FIG. 4 is a plan View of the stabilizing member shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary partly elevational view of a modified form of the invention.

FIG. 6 is a plan view of the stabilizing element illustrated in FIG. 5.

Shown in the drawings is a ladys shoe 10 having a toe portion 12, a shank portion 14, and a heel portion 16 supported by a French heel 18 according to this invention. The heel body 29 has an upper portion 22 of relatively large cross dimension and tapers in a downward direction to a relatively small cross dimension adjacent its lower end 24. The heel body has a generally horizontal downwardly facing shoulder 26 at its lower end. The heel body illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 is made of a material such as wood or a plastic into which a spike, nailing, or the equivalent can be driven.

Heel 18 has at its lower end a stabilizing member 28 which includes a load-bearing bipod fill. The bipod has an upwardly disposed, generally horizontal surface 32 which is dimensioned and configured complementally to shoulder 26 on the heel body. The two legs or feet 34 of the bipod extend downwardly and outwardly substantially symmetrically from surface 32 and terminate in downwardly disposed end faces 36. The lower central portion of the bipod is recessed upwardly as illustrated in FIG. 3, so that end faces 3d are isolated from each other. The upper end 38 of the recess is centrally aligned with upper surface 32 of the bipod and the region 40 between surfaces 32 and 38 has axially sturdy construction for a purpose to be described.

Means are provided for securing stabilizing member 28 to heel body 18; and by way of example, a spike or stud 42 projects axially upwardly from upper surface 32 of the bipod into the interior of the heel body as shown.

Feet 34 project outwardly of the heel body in a direction lateral of the toe-heel direction of the shoe. Means are provided for securing the stabilizing element in this general orientation; and for this purpose, the spike 42 is shown as being provided with serrated portions 44, 46 or the equivalent which non-rotatably engage the material of the heel body. I

in the form of the invention shown in FIGS. 14, bipod 34 is provided bodily with a covering of a relatively tough, wear-resistant material such as rubber or a suitable plastic The portions of this plastic coating underlying bipod surfaces 36 provide wear tabs 50. A thin layer 52 of the plastic material may be provided over upper surface 32 of the bipod as shown in FIG. 2 for direct engagement with shoulder 26. Bipod 34 may be provided with notching in its surface portion as illustrated in FZGS. 2 and 3 to improve the bond between the bipod and plastic coating 48.

From FIG. 1, it will be seen that stabilizing element throughout its height has a toe-heel dimension which is substantially the same as that of lower end portion 24 of the heel body. in other styles of heels, the heel body tapers outwardly somewhat at its lower end region 24, and for use with such shoes, the stabilizing element would be configured to complement the taper of the lower end of the heel body.

To assemble stabilizing element 28 to heel body 20, stud 42 is driven upwardly into the heel body by means of a hammer or similar tool, and the hammering force may be applied to upper surface 38 of the recess in the lower part of the bipod. Portion 40 of the bipod transmits the hammering force to the stud so that the stud is forced up into the heel until shoulder 32 or plastic coating thereon is brought firmly into abutment with shoulder 26 at the bottom of the heel body. The existence of a thin layer of the plastic material over surface 38 does not interfere with this process.

To those versed in the art, it will be obvious that a stabilizing element 28 and heel body 2% can be assembled either in original manufacture of the shoe or in subsequent repair of a shoe. If the shoe is originally equipped with a stabilizing element 28, it may be bodily replaced when worn; if not, a portion of the bottom of the heel body may be trimmed off to compensate for the slightly added height of the stabilizer over a conventional wear tab, and then the stabilizing element is applied to the heel body in the manner described above.

In use, wear tabs 50 provide laterally isolated supports which will operate with the toe portion of the shoe to provide a three-area contact with the ground, thereby stabilizing the shoe against lateral tipping. This eliminates or greatly reduces the danger of injury through the turning of ankles or falling. Moreover, the total area in contact with the ground is materially increased so that the danger of damage to floor surfaces and the like is materially reduced. At the same time, the low contour and the configuration of the stabilizing element in the toe-heel direction maintains the delicate, stylish appearance of the heel.

The form of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6 is in general similar to that illustrated in FIGS. 1-4, except that heel body 29a and stabilizing element 28a are shown as being all metal. Upwardly projecting stud 42a comprises a screw threaded into an opening 54 in heel body a. The screw has a headSd which engages against the top surface 38:; of the recess at the under side of bipod a to facilitate snugly engaging upper surface 32a against shoulder 26a at the bottom of the heel body.

' Stabilizing element 28a has a pair of ribs Stir which project upwardly into complemental notches in the bottom of the heel body as shown in FIG. 5. This arrangement serves to secure stabilizing element 23a in its lateral orientation relative to the toe-heel direction of the shoe. Wear tabs a are illustrated as being individual tabs secured to end faces 36a on the bipod by suitable means such as an adhesive.

This form of heel is assembled by inserting screw 42a into opening 54 and by means of screw head Sdbringing upper surface 32a of the stabilizing element into firm engagement with shoulder 26a. As in the form discussed above, this can be done either in original manufacture or upon repair. This form of heel in use has the same advantages as those discussed above with respect tothe form illustrated in FIGS. 1-4.

1 claim:

1. In a French heel for ladies shoes having a heel body of relatively large cross dimension adjacent its upper end and which tapers to a relatively small cross dimension adjacent a generally horizontal shoulder at its lower end, improved structure comprising,

a stabilizing member having an upwardly disposed generally horizontal surface dimensioned and configured substantially complementally to said shoulder,

said stabilizing member having legs which extend downwardly and outwardly of said horizontal surface in opposite directions which are lateral to the toeheel direction of said shoe,

said laterally extending legs being disposed substantially symmetrically relative to a central vertical plane extending in said toe-heel direction,

each of said laterally extending legs having a downward outward end which terminates at a downwardly disposed generally horizontal face,

said stabilizing member having a lower central portion between said legs which is upwardly recessed so that said faces are isolated from each other,

said stabilizing member having means projecting upwardly from said horizontal surface in generally vertical alignment with said recessed portion,

said upwardly projecting means engaging within said heel body and providing a fastener by which said stabilizing member is secured to said heel body with said shoulder and upwardly disposed surface interengaged,

said stabilizing member and heel body having means cooperable to secure the same against relative rotation about a vertical axis, whereby to maintain said laterally extending legs in their lateral orientation relative to said toe-heel direction,

and means providing said downwardly disposed faces with ground-engaging wear surfaces which. are laterally spaced apart, whereby to stabilize said shoe against lateral tilting.

2. The improved structure defined in claim 1 wherein said upwardly recessed portion of said stabilizing mem-' ber has a downwardly disposed central face positioned above the first-saiddownwardly disposed faces and between said legs, said central face being adapted to receive upwardly directedforce by which said stabilizing member is applied to said heel body, said stabilizing ember having portions extending between said central face and upwardly disposed surface adapted to transmit said force to facilitate interengagernent of said shoulder and surface.

3. The improved structure defined in claim lwherein said downwardly and outwardly extending legs 'of said stabilizing member are provided bodily with a wear coating, said wearcoating providing said spaced-apart wear surfaces.

4. Fora Frenchheel shoe wherein the heel body has a relatively large cross dimension adjacent'its upper end and tapers to a relatively small cross dimension adjacent a generally horizontal shoulder at its lower end,

a stabilizing member having an upwardly disposed generally horizontal surface dimensioned and configured substantially complementally to said shoulder on a shoe with which said stabilizing member is adapted to be used, a 7

said stabilizing member having legs which extend downwardly and'laterally outwardlyof said horizontal surface in opposite directions, 7

said laterally extending legs being disposed substantially symmetrically relative to a central vertical plane through said stabilizing member,

each of said laterally extending legs having a downward outward end which terminates at a downwardly disposed generally horizontal face,

said stabilizing member having a lower central portion between said legs which is upwardly recessed so that said faces are isolated from each other,

said stabilizing member having means projecting upwardly from said horizontal surface,

said upwardly; projecting means being adapted to be engaged within the heel bodyof a shoe with which said stabilizing member is adapted to be used and thereby providing fastening means by which said stabilizing member is adapted to be secured to such heel body with the shoulder thereon and said upwardly disposed surface interengaged,

said stabilizing member having means engageable with portions of such heel body and operable to secure said stabilizing means substantially non-rotatably to such heel body with said laterally extending legs in lateral orientation relative to the toe-heel direction of such shoe,

and means providing said downwardly disposed face with ground-engaging wear surfaces which are laterally spaced apart, whereby to stabilize such shoe against lateral tilting.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES. PATENTS JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner. FRANK H. COHEN, Examiner.

Citations de brevets
Brevet cité Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
US2908089 *24 juin 195713 oct. 1959Ciaio Joseph AShoe heel construction with replaceable top lift
US3041744 *23 janv. 19613 juil. 1962Pincus BraunerLift and dowel for ladies' shoes
US3074187 *12 févr. 196222 janv. 1963Klein William HHeel lift
US3106791 *16 nov. 196015 oct. 1963Essex Products IncReinforcing heel insert and heel
Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis36/34.00R, D02/966
Classification internationaleA43B21/00, A43B21/36, A43B21/24
Classification coopérativeA43B21/24, A43B21/36
Classification européenneA43B21/24, A43B21/36