Recherche Images Maps Play YouTube Actualités Gmail Drive Plus »
Connexion
Les utilisateurs de lecteurs d'écran peuvent cliquer sur ce lien pour activer le mode d'accessibilité. Celui-ci propose les mêmes fonctionnalités principales, mais il est optimisé pour votre lecteur d'écran.

Brevets

  1. Recherche avancée dans les brevets
Numéro de publicationUS3303924 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication14 févr. 1967
Date de dépôt29 sept. 1965
Date de priorité29 sept. 1965
Numéro de publicationUS 3303924 A, US 3303924A, US-A-3303924, US3303924 A, US3303924A
InventeursHartzell Jr Harry F
Cessionnaire d'origineKoppers Co Inc
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Belt training idler
US 3303924 A
Résumé  disponible en
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Revendications  disponible en
Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

Feb. 14, 1967 H. HARTZELL, JR 3,303,924

BELT TRAINING IDLER Filed Sept. 29, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 25 23/ INVENTOR.

HAPPY F. HAETZELL.

ilk S 6M Hg 3 1967 H. F. HARTZELL, JR 3,303,924

BELT TRAINING IDLER Filed Sept. 29, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

HAPPY E HAETZELL FIG. 5 gQ W his o4iZa rm;

United States Patent 3,303,924 BELT TRAINING IDLER Harry F. Hartzell, 3L, Allison Park, Pa., assignor to Koppers Company, Inc, a corporation of Delaware F iied Sept. 29, 1965, Ser. No. 491,098 11 Claims. (Cl. 198-202) This invention relates to material conveying apparatus and more particularly to apparatus for training a material conveying belt in a proper direction.

For a number of reasons, flexible conveyor belts which are relatively long often tend to move laterally and become misaligned, so that they run on either one side or the other of a desired aligned central longitudinal axial position on the carrying idlers. Such misalignment of the carrying flight, and the return flight as well, may be due to: improper alignment of the idlers with the head and tail pulleys; uneven settling of the idler supporting structures; improper belt construction; improper splices in the belt; uneven loading of the belt; and the like.

In order to correct such misalignment, it is standard practice to provide a relatively long belt conveyor with mechanical devices or training idlers which function to detect such misalignment and exert a correcting force against the belt whereby the belt is returned to a centered position on the idlers.

The present invention is unlike many devices that are available because it effectively trains a conveyor belt whether or not it is moving forward or backward. An embodiment of the invention includes a frame which is pivotally mounted in a fixed bearing for movement about an axis that is substantially normal to the belt. On the frame there are a plurality of idler rollers which are mounted for rotation about axes which, preferably, lie in a single vertical plane. Spaced apart first and second guide arms are pivotally mounted at the ends of the frame, on each side of the belt, and on each guide arm is mounted a guide roller which is rotatable about an axis that is generally normal to the guide arm.

Adjacent each set of guide arms and mounted to the frame is a cam plate which is slidable in a direction substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the belt. The cam plate has well rounded corners at each end which engage and coact with cam shaped lugs on each guide arm. Stops are provided to restrict the pivotal movement of the guide arms within desired limits.

On each cam plate there are a pair of spaced apart lugs which coact respectively with the teeth of a pair of sprocket wheels mounted on the outer ends of the idler rollers by means of one-way or over-running clutches. When the belt commences to move in one direction, the sprocket teeth of one of the wheels on each side of the belt, coact with one of the lugs to slide the cam plates into locking coacting relation with one of the guide arms on each side of the belt. The coacting guide arms are then fixed relative to the frame and urge the frame to pivot about the hearing when the misaligned belt engages one of the guide rollers mounted on the guide arms.

For a further understanding of the present invention and for further advantages and features thereof, reference may be made to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings which show, for the purpose of exemplification, a preferred embodiment of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a schematic plan view of a belt training idler embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is an end view of the embodiment of FIG. 1

looking in the direction of the arrow A;

FIG. 3 is a view along line HI-III of FIG. 2; FIG. 4 is a view along line IVIV of FIG. 2; and

"ice

FIG. 5 is a sectional view along line VV of FIG. 4.

FIG. 1 illustrates a portion of a material conveyor belt 11 supported on a belt training idler 13 which includes a plurality of idler rollers 15; there being shown for the purpose of the embodiment three idler rollers 15a, 15b, 150. Both ends of the middle rollers 15c and the inner ends of the outer rollers 15a, 15b are journally mounted to supports 17, 19 fixed to a troughed support frame 21, which is pivotally mounted, as at 23, preferably in a central location, to a suitable fixable base member 25. The base member 25 extends generally transversely of the conveyor belt 11 and may be conveniently fastened in any suitable manner to other supporting structure.

The outer end portions of the support frame 21 carry pivot arm support plates 27, 29, disposed transversely to the frame 21, and pairs of guide arms 31a, 31b, and 33a, 3317 which are independently pivotally mounted by bolts 32 in spaced apart relation at the ends of the support plates 27, 29. On each guide arm 31a, 31b, 33a, and 33b, adjacent the free end thereof, is mounted a single upstanding guide roller, such as rollers 35a, 35b, 37a, and 37b.

The outer idler rollers 15a, 15b are inclined upwardly in the conventional manner, and are generally parallel to the upwardly inclined portions of the troughed frame 21, as shown in FIG. 2. The upper outer end of each idler roller 15a, 15b is provided with a hollow shaft 39, 41 which is secured to the rollers in a conventional manner for rotation therewith. The rollers 15a, 15b are journally mounted on a spindle shaft 43, 45 which extends through the hollow shafts 39, 41 and which is suitably joumaled at the lower inner end in the supports 17, 19 and at the outer upper end in outer support brackets 47, 49. The outer support brackets 47, 49 are conveniently secured to the frame 21 by bolts, cap screws, or by means of any other suitable type of fastener.

The hollow shafts 39, 41, being fixed to the rollers 15a, 15b respectively, rotate at the same angular velocity as the idler rollers. Two sprocket wheels 51, 53, and 55, 57, are mounted on the hollow shafts 39 and 41 respectively, and the hub of each of the sprocket wheels 51, 53 and 55, 57 is fitted with an over-running or one-way clutch of conventional type.

The over-running clutch which is marketed under the trademark Formsprag, has been found to be suitable. Of course, other apparatus may be found which are suitable for moving the cam plates in the manner described herein, in quick response to changes in direction of the movement of the belt 11.

Each of the sprocket wheels 51 and 55 transmits torque from its respective hollow shaft 39 and 41 through one of the over-running clutches as the rollers 15a and 15b rotate in the direction indicated by the solid directional arrow A in FIG. 1. Likewise, each of the sprocket wheels 53 and 57 transmits torque from its respective hollow shaft 39 and 41 through the other set of the over-running clutches when the rollers 15a and 15b rotate reversibly, that is in the direction of the dotted directional arrow B of FIG. 1.

The teeth 5911 on the periphery of the sprocket wheels 53, 51 and teeth 59b on the periphery of the sprocket wheels 57, 55 engage with lugs 61 and 63 respectively on cam plates 65, 67 which are slidably supported and mounted on the frame 21 adjacent the outer support plates 27, 29. The cam plates 65, 67 are mounted in such a manner that, when urged by a force acting on the lugs 61 or 63, they are free to slide in a direction substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the conveyor belt 11.

Preferably, each cam plate 65, 67 is provided with a tongue 69 which mates with a groove in the support frame 21, as may be seen in FIG. 5, and the linear travel of the cam plates 65, 67 is limited, preferably, by stop lugs 71a,

3 71b located on the underside of the cam plates 65, 67 which engage the sides of the support frame 21. In FIGS. 3 and 4, the belt 11 is moving in the direction of the arrow A and the cam plate 65 is shown in the farthest left position; the stop lug 71a engaging the right hand side of the frame 21.

The periphery of each slidable cam plate 65, 67 is provided with a pair of generously rounded corners 73a, 73b, as indicated in FIG. 4, which serve as cams to engage and actuate cam follower lugs 75a, 75b, 77a, and 77b on the guide arms 31a, 31b, 33a, and 33]; respectively. Each cam follower lug 75a, 75b, 77a, 77b is provided with a flat surface 79 which engages a vertical stop 81 that is fixed to the support plates 27, 29 and that limits the pivotal movement of the guide arms 31a, 31b, 33a, and 33b.

In operation, the conveyor belt 11 is reversible and moves forwardly in the direction of the arrow A, and reversibly in the direction of the arrow B. Initially, it is assumed that the belt 11 is traveling forwardly in the direction of the arrow A, and is substantially aligned on the idler rollers 15.

When the belt first commences to move in the direction of the arrow A, the hollow shafts 39, 41, which are secured to the rollers 15a, 15b, rotate. The sprocket wheels 51, 55 rotate also because of the action of the over-running clutches mounted in the hubs of the sprocket wheels, whereby the teeth 59a on sprocket Wheels 51, 55 engage the lug 61 and urge the plates 65, on both sides of the belt, towards the left, as viewed in FIG. 3; that is to say, the plate 65 moves in a direction opposite to the direction of movement of the belt 11.

As the cam plate 65 moves toward the left, as seen in FIG. 4, the cam-like corner 73b engages the cam follower lug 75b, of the roller supporting guide arm 31b, and the arm 31b, then rotates about its pivot axis in bolts 32 until the straight edge 79 engages the vertical stop lug 81. It will be understood by those skilled in the art, of course, that the cam plate 65 on the other side of the belt (see FIG. 1) also moves toward the left, under the influence of the sprocket wheel 57, and engages the cam follower lug 77b of the guide arm 33b. In this situation, both of the guide arms 31b, 33b are fixed and cannot pivot further, and the rollers 35b, 37!), mounted on the guide arms, are fixed in position relative to the frame 21 and the lateral edges of the belt 11.

Although the guide arms 31b, 33b are fixed, the other roller supporting guide arms 31a, 33a, are free to pivot about their respective axes in bolts 32 and are not restrained except that the amount of pivoting is limited purposely by the vertical stop lugs 81 and a pointed projection 83 on each guide arm which is engageable with the stop lug 81.

It should be apparent then, that the vertical rollers 35b, 37b and the guide arms 31b, 33b are operative to realign the conveyor belt whenever the same becomes misaligned and engages either rollers 35b or 37b. The othr rollers 35a, 37a are now inoperative and are freely pivotable within the limits mentioned previously.

FIG. 1 also illustrates the belt 11 in a typical misaligned position, shown by the dotted outlined form; the belt having moved laterally toward the upstanding guide rollers 35a, 35b. Actually, the longitudinal edge 85 of the belt 11, in the lower portion of FIG. 1, engages the fixed rollers 35b and the belt 11 then exerts a lateral force on the roller and guide arm 31b, which urges the entire idler roller assembly to pivot in a counterclockwise direction about the central pivot 23. The counterclockwise pivotal motion is suggested by the directional arrow C in FIG. 1. The idler assembly pivots in the direction of the arrow C until the transverse axis 87 of the idler rollers 15 assumes a biased position, indicated generally at 87a in FIG. 1. In this biased position, the idler rollers 15 exert a force on the moving belt 11, in a manner known to those skilled in the art, which urges the belt laterally away from the roller 35b and toward its initial centrally aligned position. As is known, when the belt moves laterally under the influence of this corrective force, the idler roller assembly pivots oppositely, or in the direction of the arrow D, and also returns to its initial transverse position.

In like manner, should the conveyor belt 11 move laterally into engagement with the other fixed guide rollers 37b (upwardly, as viewed in FIG. 1), then the entire idler roller assembly will pivot clockwise about the axis of the bearing 23, in the direction of the arrow D, and the idler rollers 15 will again exert a corrective force on the belt 11 urging it back toward the central aligned position, as explained previously.

Now, if it be assumed that the conveyor belt 11, after moving in the direction of the arrow A, has been stopped and then commences to move in the direction of the arrow B, the sprocket wheels 51, 55, acting through the other set of over-running clutches, immediately rotate in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 3. The teeth 59b on sprocket wheels 51, 55, being in contact with the lugs 63, immediately move the cam plates toward the right, as viewed in FIGS. 1 and 4. When the cam plates 65 move toward the right, the cam-like corners 73a engage and coact with the cam follower lugs 75a, 77a of the roller supporting guide arms 31a, 33a respectively, whereby the guide arms 31a, 33a and the rollers 35a, 37a become fixed relative to the support frame 21 and the edges of the belt 11.

Thereafter, should the belt 11 while traveling in the direction of the arrow B, become misaligned and move laterally to bring the edge into engagement with either the roller 35a or roller 37a, then the interaction of the belt edge with the roller 35a or 37:: would cause pivoting movement of the roller assembly in the direction of the arrows D or C, as the case may be. And so, as explained previously, a corrective force acting between the belt 11 and the rollers 15 urges the belt laterally toward its initial centrally aligned position.

In accordance with the present invention, pivotally mounted guide arms and belt engaging rollers supported thereon, on opposite sides of the conveyor belt, are automatically fixed relative to the support frame of the belt idler apparatus immediately the belt moves in one direc tion, and another pair of opposite guide arms and rollers are automatically fixed relative to the idler supporting frame immediately the belt reverses and moves in the op posite direction.

That the positioning of the respective opposite pairs of guide rollers occurs automatically, whether the conveyor belt is moving forward or backward, is significant in main. taining a reversible conveyor belt in a substantially cen= trally aligned position.

While the embodiment illustrated discloses a troughed frame and supporting idler rollers, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the invention is not so limited but is applicable to pivoted idlers supporting a flat return flight, a flat carrying flight, and the like.

A significant feature of the present invention is the automatic fixing of an opposed pair of guide arms and the edge engaging rollers mounted thereon by means of the slidable cam plates which also disengages simultaneously the other opposed pair of guide arms and renders them freely pivotable, within preselected limits, and inoperative. The operative rollers on the fixed guide arms are automatically disposed in a position relative to the frame which is directionally opposite to the direction of movement of the belt whereby when the edge of the misaligned belt engages one of the operative rollers a corrective force couple acting about the pivot axis of the frame urges the frame to pivot to a biased position relative to the axis of the belt.

Although the foregoing describes the invention with a certain degree of particularity, it is understood that the present disclosure has been made only by way of an example and that various modifications and changes may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as hereinafter claimed.

What is claimed is:

1. A training idler for use with a material conveyor belt comprising:

(a) a frame pivotal about an axis substantially normal to said belt;

(b) an idler roller rotatably supported on said frame for alignably supporting said belt;

(c) a guide arm pivotally mounted to said frame adjacent each end thereof on opposite sides of said belt;

(d) a guide roller rotatably mounted on each guide arm end portion;

(e) guide arm fixing members slidably mounted on said frame;

(f) means automatically operable in response to the rotation of said idler roller to move said guide arm fixing members in the direction opposite the movement of said belt and into fixable engagement with said guide arms; and

g) means to fix said guide arms so that the rollers mounted thereon are disposed in a position relative to said frame that is opposite in direction to the direction of movement of said belt, whereby when said belt becomes misaligned and one edge thereof engages one of said fixed rollers, said frame and the idler roller mounted thereon are pivoted into a biased relation to said belt and said idler roller then exerts a force on said belt which urges said misaligned belt into alignment.

2. A training idler for a reversible material belt conveyor comprising:

(a) a frame pivotal about an axis substantially normal to a belt moving in a first direction;

(b) a plurality of idler rollers rotatably supported on said frame for alignably supporting said belt;

() spaced apart first and second guide arms pivotally mounted to said frame adjacent each end portion thereof on opposite sides of said belt;

(d) a guide roller rotatably mounted on each guide arm end portion;

(e) guide arm actuating members mounted slidably on said frame for movement substantially parallel to the axis of said belt;

(f) means automatically operable in response to the rotation of said idler roller to move said guide arm actuating members in the direction opposite said first direction and into engagement with a first one of said guide arms on each side of said belt whereby said engaged guide arms pivot;

(g) means to fix the thus engaged first guide arms and the rollers mounted thereon in position relative to said frame whereby when said belt becomes misaligned and one edge thereof engages one of said first fixed rollers, said frame and said idler rollers are pivoted into a biased position and said idler rollers exert a force on said belt which urges said misaligned belt into alignment;

(h) means to move said guide arm actuating members in said first direction when said belt is moving in a second direction opposite to said first direction, and into engagement with a second one of said guide arms on each side of said belt whereby said second guide arms pivot; and

(i) means to fix the thus engaged second guide arms and the rollers mounted thereon in position relative to said frame whereby when said belt becomes misaligned and one edge thereof engages one of said second fixed rollers, said frame and said idler rollers are pivoted into a biased position and said idler rollers exert a force on said belt which urges said misaligned belt into alignment.

3. A training idler for a reversible conveyor belt comprising:

(a) a frame pivotable about an axis substantially normal to said belt;

(b) an idler roller rotatably mounted on said frame for supporting said belt in a normally aligned position transverse the axis of said roller;

(c) guide arms pivotally mounted on said frame on each side of said belt and supporting belt edge engaging means adjacent the ends of said arms; and

(d) means automatically operable in response to the rotation of said idler roller and slidable on said frame for coacting with a guide arm on each side of said belt and fixing the edge engaging means mounted thereon each in a position relative to said frame that is opposite in direction to the direction of movement of said belt, whereby as said moving belt becomes misaligned and one edge thereof engages one of the fixed edge engaging means, said frame pivots about said normal axis and said idler roller is biased with respect to said belt and exerts an alignment corrective force on said belt tending to urge said belt into said normally aligned position.

4. A belt training idler as set forth in claim 3 further characterized in that:

(a) the rollers supported by said guide arms are maintained at the same level when contacting the edge of said belt irrespective of the direction of movement of said belt.

5. A training idler as defined in claim 3 further characterized in that:

(a) the rotational axis of the rollers supported by said guide arms are substantially normal to the adjacent longitudinal edge of said belt.

6. The invention set forth in claim 3 further characterized in that:

(a) the guide arms on each side of said belt are pivotal about axes which are substantially parallel and perpendicular to the belt.

7. The invention set forth in claim 3 further characterized in that:

(a) the guide arms on both sides of the belt are individually pivotally mounted and alternately operative when the moving belt reverses its direction of movement.

8. A training idler for use with a conveyor belt adapted to travel in first and second opposite directions comprismg:

(a) a bar disposed transversely of said belt and mounted for pivotal movement about an axis sub stantially normal to said belt;

(b) roll means rotatably mounted on said bar for alignably supporting said belt and relative to which said belt may become misaligned;

(c) first and second spaced apart guide arms individually pivotally mounted to said bar on each side of said belt;

(d) means mounted on said guide arms engageable with the edge of said belt;

(e) cam plates slidably mounted to said bar; and

(f) clutch actuated sprocket wheel means mounted on said roll means and engageable with said cam plates as said belt moves in said first and second directions, said cam plates moving oppositely to the movement of said belt into engagement with a guide arm on each side of said belt and fixing said belt edge engaging means in relation to said transverse bar whereby as said belt becomes misaligned with respect to said roll means and contacts a fixed edge engaging means, said roll means is moved to a biased position with respect to said belt and exerts a force on said belt urging the same toward an aligned position relative to said roll means.

9. In a belt training idler for supporting a conveyor belt including a transversely disposed frame pivotally mounted 7 I for movement about an axis substantially normal to a portion of the belt and roller means rotatably mounted on said frame for supporting said belt, the improvement comprising:

(a) a plurality of guide arms independently pivotally mounted to said frame on each side of said belt;

(b) means mounted on each guide arm for engagement with the edge of said belt;

() means slidably mounted on said frame for engagement with and fixing at least one guide arm on each side of said belt; and

(d) sprocket wheel means actuatable by said roller means engaging said frame mounted slidable means whereby, as said belt moves in a given direction, said frame mounted slidable means moves in the opposite direction and fixedly engages one of said guide arms on each side of said belt relative to said frame, the edge engaging means mounted on said fixed guide arms being disposed relative to said frame in a direction opposite the given direction of movement of said belt, whereby as said belt becomes misaligned with respect to said roller means and engages a fixed edge engaging means, said frame is pivoted into biased relation with respect to said belt and said roller means exerts a force on said belt urging the same toward an aligned position relative to said roller means.

10. A training device for maintaining a travelling belt in a preselected line of travel comprising:

(a) a roller for supporting said belt extending generally transversely of said belt and journally mounted in means adapted for rotation about an axis perpendicular to said belt;

(b) guide means displaced from said roller adapted to engage and coact with an edge of said belt;

(c) means automatically operable in response to the rotation of said idler roller and laterally movable in a direction substantially opposite and parallel to the direction of travel of said belt and engageable with said guide means whereby the same is fixed relative to said roller mounting means; and

(d) means connecting said guide means and said roller mounting means for applying to said roller a force derived from the force exerted by said belt against said guide means when the same travels in a line different from said preselected line whereby said roller is biased with respect to said belt line of travel and said biased roller applies a corrective force to said belt and the same returns to its preselected line of travel.

11. A training device for maintaining a moving belt in a preselected line of travel comprising:

(a) roller means extending generally transversely of said belt and rotatably mounted in means adapted for rotation about an axis substantially normal to said belt;

(b) guide means displaced from the axis of said roller adapted to engage and coact with an edge of said belt;

(c) linkage connecting said guide means and said roller supporting means adapted for applying a force to said roller derived from the force exerted on said guide means when the same is contacted by said belt as it travels in a line different from said preselected line of travel and said roller is biased with respect to said belt and said roller applies to said belt a corrective force urging said belt to said preselected line of travel; and

(d) means operable in response to the rotation of said idler roller and automatically movable translationally in a direction opposite the direction of movement of said belt and engageable with said guide means to fix the same in a location with respect to the axis of said roller on the side thereof opposite the direction of travel of said belt.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,821,291 1/1958 Schott 198-202 2,892,534 6/1959 Ogden 198202 3,066,547 12/1962 Evans et al 198202 X 3,246,736 4/1966 Lo Presti 198202 EVON C. BLUNK, Primary Examiner.

M. L. AJEMAN, Assistant Examiner.

Citations de brevets
Brevet cité Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
US2821291 *9 févr. 195528 janv. 1958Link Belt CoBelt training idler
US2892534 *27 juin 195730 juin 1959Goodman Mfg CoConveyor belt training assembly
US3066547 *14 déc. 19594 déc. 1962Link Belt CoBelt training idler
US3246736 *5 mars 196219 avr. 1966Goodman Mfg CoTwo direction shock absorbing troughing idler assembly
Référencé par
Brevet citant Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
US3719098 *22 mars 19716 mars 1973Olin CorpPulley belt assembly
US3731550 *3 janv. 19728 mai 1973Whirlpool CoBelt shifter for a variable speed drive
US4629062 *29 août 198316 déc. 1986A. D. Smith Harvestore Products, Inc.Belt trainer apparatus for a conveyor
US5222594 *31 mars 199229 juin 1993Bridgestone CorporationTwist correction device for pipe conveyor
US5293988 *26 févr. 199315 mars 1994Bridgestone CorporationTwist correction device for pipe conveyor
US5458230 *16 mars 199417 oct. 1995Balcar; James E.Center loading conveyor assembly
US6116410 *26 mars 199812 sept. 2000Svedala Trellex AbDevice for steering a conveyor belt
US6186317 *28 mai 199713 févr. 2001A/S Techno TrackBelt steering assembly for centering of conveyor belts
US6405854 *6 oct. 199818 juin 2002Tru-Trac Rollers (Pty) LimitedBelt tracking assembly
US6431348 *16 janv. 200113 août 2002Svedala Trellex AbDevice for steering a conveyor belt
US796712922 sept. 200828 juin 2011Martin Engineering CompanyConveyor belt training idler with a locking mechanism
WO2009016484A1 *31 juil. 20085 févr. 2009John Pear CumberlegeTraining idler roller assembly for a heavy duty conveyor belt
WO2010033892A1 *21 sept. 200925 mars 2010Martin Engineering CompanyConveyor belt training idler with a locking mechanism
Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis198/806, 198/808, 474/106
Classification internationaleB65G39/10, B65G39/16
Classification coopérativeB65G39/16
Classification européenneB65G39/16