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Numéro de publicationUS3308560 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication14 mars 1967
Date de dépôt28 juin 1965
Date de priorité28 juin 1965
Numéro de publicationUS 3308560 A, US 3308560A, US-A-3308560, US3308560 A, US3308560A
InventeursJones James P
Cessionnaire d'origineEndicott Johnson Corp
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Rubber boot with fibreglass instep guard
US 3308560 A
Résumé  disponible en
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Revendications  disponible en
Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

March 14, 1967 P, JONES RUBBER BOOT WITH FIBREGLASS INSTEP GUARD 2 Sheets-S bset 1 Filed June 28, 1965 INVENTOR J'AMEJ R f /v ATTORNEYS J. P. JONES RUBBER BOOT WITH FIBREGLASS INSTEP GUARD March 14, 1967 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 28, 1965 INVENTOR JAM/E: x J'dA/Ej BY K V/ W ATTQRNEYJ United States Patent 3,308,560 RUBBER BOOT WITH FIBREGLASS INSTEP GUARD James P. Jones, Binghamton, N.Y., assignor to Endicott- Johnson Corporation, Endicott, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed June 28, 1965, Ser. No. 467,462 8 Claims. (Cl. 36-4) This invention relates to improved safety footwear and more particularly to improved safety rubber boots.

Rubber boots are frequently worn under adverse and hazardous conditions as by firemen, rescue and demolition workers and in manufacturing operations such as metal plating, metal cleaning and the like. Under these conditions it is desirable not only to afford protection from water, acids, alkali, solvent and other liquids, but also to protect the feet from falling objects and impacts. Heretofore, rubber boots have been provided with metal toe boxes to protect the toes from falling objects but no satisfactory protection has been provided for the metatarsal and instep portions of the foot.

It is a prime object of the present invention to provide an improved safety rubber boot Which not only affords protection against liquids but also protects the toe, metatarsal and instep portions of the foot of the wearer against falling objects and impacts.

Further objects include the provision of an improved safety boot of the above character having the improved features referred to above which is relatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture; in which the appearance is not adversely affected by the safety features; and which can be worn in the usual manner without in any Way disturbing the comfort of the wearer.

My invention contemplates the provision of an improved safety rubber boot of the type having a sole assembly with an elastomeric outsole and an upper having a toe portion, a metatarsal portion and an instep portion and formed of an outer layer of elastomeric material sealed to the outsole and having a liner in at least the toe, metatarsal and instep portions. A metal box toe is provided in the upper inside the toe portion so as to rest directly on the sole assembly. A metatarsal and instep guard is also dis-posed inside the upper and has depending sides resting on and supported by the sole assembly. The forward edge of the guard overlaps the metal toe box and is preferably spaced upwardly therefrom. Thus, the metatarsal and instep guard finds additional support from the box toe when a force is applied thereto. In addition, the overlapping portion of the guard may shift relative to the box toe when the boot is flexed.

In a preferred form of my invention the metatarsal and instep guard is made from a fibreglass reinforced resin and it has a liner in the form of a yielding pad.

In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a safety rubber boot embodying my invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view in the direction of the arrows on the lines 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view in the direction of the arrows on the line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the metatarsal and instep guard showing it separated from the shoe; and

FIGS. 5 and 6 are cross-sectional and fragmentary longitudinal sectional views, respectively, corresponding to FIGS. 2 and 3 but showing a modified form of boot having a shield of puncture-resisting material incorporated in the sole assembly.

My invention is particularly applicable to rubber boots and in the accompanying drawings I have illustrated the invention as being incorporated in a safety rubber boot.

3,308,560 Patented Mar. 14, 1967 The specific embodiment shown in FIG. 1 is a knee-length boot but it will be appreciated that the boot may be of any length.

The illustrated boot comprises generally a sole assembly 10 and an upper 12. The upper comprises a leg-enveloping tubular portion 14 extending from the foot portion to approximately the knee portion of the wearer. The leg-enveloping portion 14 may be made in the usual manner of an outer layer of elastomeric material in sheet form, such as natural or synthetic rubber and an inner layer or lining made of a suitable fabric, such as canvas or rubberized canvas adhesively secured to the outer layer.

The outer layer may be made of a rubber sheeting alone but is preferably made, in the usual manner of boots of this type, from a plurality of piles of laminated rubber sheeting and fabric. The laminated layers of fabric lining and of elastomeric sheet material and fabric are wrapped into tubular form and preferably overlapped at the rear of the boot with the overlapping layers suitably secured together by adhesive or by vulcanization, or both.

The adhesive which may be employed in laminating the layers together and also in securing the overlapping layers together should be compatible and adhere to rubber, metal and cloth, and for this purpose I prefer to use a natural or synthetic rubber cement.

At its lower end the leg-enveloping portion 14 is suitably secured to the foot-encasing portion 15 in the usual manner by suitable adhesive, vulcanization, or both With the foot-encasing portion preferably overlapping the legenveloping portion. The foot-encasing portion of the upper is also of conventional design and appearance and has a forward toe portion, intermediate metatarsal and instep portions and a rear heel portion. As in the case of the leg-enveloping portion, the foot-encasing portion is made of an outer layer of an elastomeric material shown at 16 in FiGS. 2, 3, 5 and 6 and an inner layer of lining material 17 made of a suitable fabric, such as canvas or a rubberized fabric.

The outer layer is preferably made of a plurality of laminated piles of natural or synthetic rubber sheet material and fabric. The several layers of material are laminated together by an adhesive as explained above. The elastomeric material of the foot-encasing portion is sealed directly to the elastomeric material of the leg-enveloping portion.

The sole assembly 10 consists of an outsole 18 made of an elastomeric material, such as natural or synthetic rubber, and an inner sole 2%) with a filler 22 disposed therebetween. 4

The outsole is preferably molded from natural or synthetic rubber and preferably has suitable serrations and thread formed on the lower surface thereof to minimize the danger of slipping. A heel 19 is molded directly to the outsole or is suitably secured thereto by an adhesive, vulcanization, or both. The inner sole 20 may be made from laminated layers or fabric and rubber or from rubberized fabric. The filler may similarly be made of laminated layers of rubber and fabric or from rubberized fabric. All of the layers are laminated together as by rubber cement. The outsole is preferably sealed directly to the outer elastomeric layer of the upper, as by rubber cement, vulcanization, or both. A reinforcing strip of natural or synthetic rubber, preferably serrated on its outer surface, is secured around the lower portion of the boot at the point of juncture between the outsole and the upper, as shown, as by rubber cement, vulcanization, or both. In addition, a reinforcing tip 26 of natural or synthetic rubber, preferably extends around the front of the toe of the boot, as shown, to provide additional reinforcement. The tip 25 likewise is preferably serrated on its outer surface and is secured to the upper, to the strip 24 and to the outsole as by rubber cement, vulcanization, or both.

The rubber boot as described above is illustrative of one type of rubber boot to which my invention is applicable. It should be understood that the boot may be made by any known boot manufacturing procedures and that my invention may also be applied to other types of safety rubber boots.

The improved safety features incorporated in my boot comprise both a toe box 28 in the toe portion of the upper and a metatarsal and instep guard 30 in the metatarsal and instep portion of the upper.

The toe box is preferably made of a relatively rigid high-impact metal material, such as stainless steel, bronze or hard aluminum alloy, and it is preferably positioned between the elastomeric outer layers of material and the lining. It is of arched configuration so as to provide clearance for the toes and it extends downwardly at the front and sides of the toe portion of the upper so as to rest directly upon the sole assembly of the boot to be supported thereby. Thus, when an impact is imparted to the toe portion of the boot as by a falling object, the force is received by the metal toe box and transmitted directly to the sole assembly, thereby preventing damage or injury to the toes of the wearer. An additional layer of soft lining material may be provided between the lining 17 and the metal box toe 28 so as to protect the toes from injury.

The metatarsal and instep guard 30 is also made of a relatively rigid, strong material which will withstand impacts and, for this purpose, the guard may be made of a metal similar to that used in the box toe. However, I prefer to make the guard from a fibreglass reinforced resin such as a phenolic resin, polystyrene, or the like.

The guard is of a generally arched configuration, having a transversely convex inner surface and transversely concave outer surface and a longitudinally convex inner surface and a longitudinally concave outer surface. It conforms generally in configuration with the configuration of the metatarsal and instep portions of the foot and of the boot upper. The sides of the guard extend downwardly, as shown, and at the central and forward portion thereof they rest directly upon the sole assembly so as to receive their principal support therefrom. Thus, when a blow as from a falling object is applied to the metatarsal or instep portion of the boot, it is transmitted directly to the sole assembly by the guard.

In addition, the forward portion of the guard overlaps the rear portions of the metal box toe so as to obtain additional support from the box toe should an excessive blow or impact be applied to the guard.

As in the case of the box toe, the guard 30 is preferably positioned between the outer elastomeric layer 16 and the lining 17. An additional lining in the form of a pad 32 made of a soft, yielding, elastomeric material, such as natural or synthetic rubber or plastic foam, is preferably secured to the under surface of the guard between the guard and the lining 17, as shown. The several layers of material are preferably secured together by a suitable adhesive, such as natural or synthetic rubber cement.

The relationship between the leading end of the guard and the trailing end of the box toe is such that they can preferably shift longitudinally with respect to each other when the boot is flexed, as in walking. For this purpose the overlapping portion of the guard is preferably spaced slightly above the underlying surface of the box toe as shown. However, under any circumstances it should not have tight frictional engagement therewith so that the guard and box toe are relatively slidable in a longitudinal direction with respect to each other. In addition, the lower edges of the sides of the guard are convexly curved as shown to facilitate relative flexing of the sole assembly and relative rocking or tilting of the guard as the boot is flexed in walking, bending, leaning or stooping of the wearer.

While the upper portion of the guard is free from frictional engagement with the upper surface of the box toe so that relative movement is permitted, it should be noted that the inter-relationship between the side walls of the guard and the side walls of the box toe are such as to prevent undue lateral displacement of the guard.

The modified form of safety boot shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 is essentially the same as that shown in FIGS. 1 to 4 with the exception that I have included a flexible layer or shield of puncture-resisting material between the out sole and inner sole, as shown at 35. The shield should be substantially co-extensive with the insole of the boot so as to afford protection to the entire area of the foot of the wearer from nails and other sharp objects which the wearer might step on. As indicated above, it should be made of a puncture-resisting material which is sufficiently flexible so as to permit flexing of the boot in walking, bending and stooping. For this purpose the shield may be made of a thin layer of steel, bronze or a hard aluminum alloy.

An improved safety boot embodying my invention may be applied to the foot and utilized in the usual manner. Should an impact or a blow as from a falling object be applied to the toe, metatarsal or instep portions of the boot, the blow will be transmitted directly to the sole assembly of the boot, thereby protecting the foot of the wearer. In addition, the arrangement of the guard and of the box toe are such that the boot is comfortable to Wear and Will readily flex as during walking, bending or stooping of the wearer. It will also be seen that the safety features of my improved boot do not detract from the appearance thereof and that the boot can be manufactured and assembled in the usual manner.

I claim:

1. Safety footwear comprising: a sole assembly; an upper having a toe portion, a metatarsal portion and an instep portion and formed of an outer layer of a flexible material and a flexible lining extending at least through the toe, metatarsal and instep portions; a rigid domeshaped metal box toe disposed in the toe portion of the upper between the outer layer and the liner and extending downwardly at the side and front portions thereof into engagement with the sole assembly so as to be supported thereby; and a metatarsal and instep guard made of a strong rigid material and having a generally arch-shaped configuration with a transversely concave inner surface and transversely convex outer surface and a longitudinally convex inner surface and a longitudinally concave outer surface and extending through the metatarsal portion and at least the forward part of the instep portion of the upper between the outer layer and liner with its side edges extending downwardly and resting and supported on the sole assembly and with its forward edge overlapping the trailing edge of the metal box toe so that it will obtain additional support therefrom, said guard and box toe being free from attachment to each other so that the overlapping portions may shift relative to each other upon flexing of the footwear.

2. A safety rubber boot comprising: a sole assembly including an outsole made of an elastomeric material and an inner sole supported on the outsole; an upper having a toe portion, a metatarsal portion, an instep portion and a leg-enveloping portion and formed of an outer layer of an elastomeric material sealed to the outsole and a liner extending at least through the toe, metatarsal and instep portions; a rigid dome-shaped metal box toe disposed in the toe portion of the upper between the elastomeric outer layer and the liner and extending downwardly at the side and front portions thereof into engagement with the sole assembly so as to be supported thereby; and a metatarsal and instep guard made of a strong rigid material and having a generally arch-shaped configuration with a transversely concave inner surface and transversely convex outer surface and a longitudinally convex inner surface and a longitudinally concave outer surface and extending through the metatarsal portion and at least the forward part of the instep portion of the upper between the outer layer and liner with its side edges extending downwardly and resting and supported on the sole assembly and with its forward edge overlapping the trailing edge of the metal box toe so that it will obtain additional support therefrom, said guard and box toe being free from attachment to each other so that the overlapping portions may shift relative to each other upon flexing of the boot.

3. A safety rubber boot as set forth in claim 2 in which the overlapping portion of the metatarsal and instep guard is spaced slightly above the box toe so as to facilitate shifting and pivoting of the box toe and guard relative to each other on flexing of the boot.

4. A safety rubber boot as set forth in claim 2 in which a shield in the form of a thin flexible layer of punctureresisting material extends substantially throughout the sole assembly between the outsole and inner sole.

5. A safety rubber boot as set forth in claim 2 in which a layer of resilient, yielding padding material is secured to and extends over the major portion of the under surface of the guard.

6. A safety rubber boot as set forth in claim 2 in which the box toe and guard are adhesively secured in position between the outer layer and liner.

7. A safety rubber boot as set forth in claim 2 in which thte metatarsal and instep guard is made of fibreglass reinforced resin.

8. A safety rubber boot as set forth in claim 2 in which the lower side edges of the metatarsal and instep guard are convexly curved in a longitudinal direction so as to facilitate flexing of the boot.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS PATRICK D. LAWSON, Primary Examiner.

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Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis36/4, 36/59.00R
Classification internationaleA43B7/32
Classification coopérativeA43B7/32
Classification européenneA43B7/32