Recherche Images Maps Play YouTube Actualités Gmail Drive Plus »
Connexion
Les utilisateurs de lecteurs d'écran peuvent cliquer sur ce lien pour activer le mode d'accessibilité. Celui-ci propose les mêmes fonctionnalités principales, mais il est optimisé pour votre lecteur d'écran.

Brevets

  1. Recherche avancée dans les brevets
Numéro de publicationUS3352303 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication14 nov. 1967
Date de dépôt28 juil. 1965
Date de priorité28 juil. 1965
Numéro de publicationUS 3352303 A, US 3352303A, US-A-3352303, US3352303 A, US3352303A
InventeursLawrence J Delaney
Cessionnaire d'origineLawrence J Delaney
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Method for blood clot lysis
US 3352303 A
Résumé  disponible en
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Revendications  disponible en
Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

Nov. 14, 1967 J. DELANEY 3,352,303

I METHOD FOR BLOOD CLOT LYSIS Filed July 28, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 1967 L. J. DELANEY METHOD FOR BLOOD CL-OT LYSIS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 28, 1965 United States Patent ()filice 3,352,303 Patented Nov. 14, 1967 3,352,303 IVE'I'HOD FOR BLOOD CLOT LYSIS Lawrence J. Delaney, Newton Center, Mass. 547 W. Elm t., Brockton, Mass. 02401) Filed July 28, 1965, Ser. No. 475,337 15 Claims. (Cl. 128--24) This invention relates generally to the treatment of cardiovascular disease in humans and, more particularly, to the lysis of blood clots in the blood vessels of living human beings by the direct application to the clot of sonic or supersonic energy vibrations.

The treatment of diseases of the human body by the application of various forms of wave energy has been suggested in the past including the possibility of direct application of vibrational wave energy at sonic or supersonic frequencies for the break-up of calcific deposits associated with the valves of the heart. These techniques generally involve radical surgical procedures for the application of the probe to the affected area and the required duration of application of the sonic energy is substantial. The effect on normal tissue of the energy applied has been found to produce inflammation which increases the danger associated With the procedure.

The present invention is directed to the treatment and cure of a much more widespread form of cardiovascular disease than the specific forms heretofore mentioned. The present invention is based on the discovery that the lysis or dissolution of blood clots wherever they may occur in the body can be achieved using vibrational wave energy. The lysis of the clot is accomplished without necessarily employing radical surgical procedures and in a manner to eliminate any side effects or secondary results which would be dangerous to the patient. As is well known, the occurrence of blood clots anywhere throughout the cardiovascular system is a matter of grave concern for both the patient who suffers from this particular form of disease and the doctor who is to treat him. At present there is no specific therapy available to effectively lyse blood clots.

The present invention provides methods and procedures for the treatment of blood clots in the human body in a manner to completely lyse elements forming the clot into minute particles of subcellular size without the danger of reclotting occurring once disassociation has occurred. The processes of the invention can be practiced in almost all instances by resorting to relatively minor surgical techniques in which the portion of the anatomy upon which the surgery is performed can be selected with relatively complete freedom, thereby permitting the procedure to be practiced without approaching the aggravated portion of the patients cardiovascular system.

The present invention accomplishes the beneficial results described herein by the direct application of sonic, transonic or ultrasonic vibrational wave energy directly to the blood clot at its location in the patients body. It has been determined that a blood clot can be completely lysed by the direct application of tolerable amounts of energy for short periods of time and, in particular, times which are so short that the heating effects normally associated with the application of concentrated wave energy to the human body do not present a significant problem. The lysis of the clot under these conditions has been shown to effect a breakdown of the clotted mass into subcellular particles which show no tendency to reclot or coagulate once the lysis has taken place and thereby permits the procedure to cure the diseased condition without introducing any danger of reclotting or complications due to surgery in the afflicted area.

In practicing the present invention, surgical procedures are involved to expose suitable arteries or veins which are used as points of entry for the insertion of an ultrasonic probe to be guided to the location of the blood clot in order that the wave energy from the end of the probe can be applied directly to the blood clot. Almost all critical areas in the cardiovascular system which are subject to the formation of blood clots can, generally be reached by the insertion of a probe which enters the body at a surgically exposed artery or vein in the limbs where the surgery involved is not significantly traumatic. Generally more than one such approach is available to reach any diseased area and hence an area that is non-vital can be selected for the point of entry. Thus the procedure can be accomplished with a minimum of danger to the patients condition.

Also as a consequence of the accessibility of almost all parts of the cardiovascular system to approach by a remotely inserted probe, the procedures of this invention permit the placement of the end of the probe directly in contact with the blood clot or in extremely close proximity thereto, thus permitting the longitudinal vibration of the end of the probe to propagate wave energy axially from the end of the probe and directly into the blood clot, thereby providing an efficient transfer of energy into the blood clot, to be lysed and a consequent minimum generation of heat in adjoining tissues. The end of the probe can also be advanced into the clot and this coupling is particularly effective for transverse vibration modes of the probe. By virtue of the efliciency of the lysis of the clot under these conditions, the problems normally associated with damage by heat from wave energy applied to the associated normal tissue and the blood vessel in which the probe is placed are avoided.

In accordance with another feature of the invention, a flexible tubular catheter may be inserted in the blood vessel for providing a guiding channel for the subsequent insertion of the ultrasonic probe Within the tubular catheter. This procedure permits the probe to be inserted Within the tubular catheter and guided thereby and thus minimizes the danger of puncturing the wall of the blood vessel.

The use of the tubular catheter also permits the introduction of a radio-opaque dye for the purpose of obtaining an arteriogram to locate the thrombus. An arteriogram before the application of the wave energy from the probe is used to precisely locate the clot. After the application of the wave energy to the clot the effectiveness of the application can be observed and a second application applied if the lysis is not complete. The repeated application of a minimal dosage can be utilized to achieve the ultimate goal of a complete lysis of the thrombus.

Another modification involves employing a tubular probe for the transmissionof the vibrational wave energy with suitable fittings thereon for introducing a liquid, thus a liquid coolant or a radio-opaque dye can be introduced by means of the probe itself thereby simplifying the procedure. The incompressible fluid within such a probe also serves as a wave transmitting medium.

It is the object of this invention to provide, in accordance with the foregoing features and advantages, a method for the lysis of blood clots in vivo in the human body by the application of localized vibrational energy to the blood clot.

The invention will be described with reference to the drawings which illustrate preferred surgical procedures that may be employed in practicing the invention. Other procedures for approaching the occlusion may be used and the invention is accordingly not to be construed as limited to the particular procedures shown.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a detailed view of a probe-catheter insertion through the femoral artery for a proximal approach to a clot in the femoral artery or the aorta.

FIG. 2 is a general view of a probe-catheter insertion through the femoral artery for a distal femoral artery clot.

FIG. 3 is a view showing direct carotid artery system approach in the neck.

FIGS. 4 and 5 are views showing. subclavian-axillarybrachial arterial system distal and proximal approaches respectively; and

FIG. 6 is a general view of a form of suitable apparatus and a modified form of probe.

Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2, theintroduction of the probe-catheter through the femoral artery will be described. This approach is suitable for sonation of any systemic arterial segment. Using general anesthesia the patient is placed in the supine position. The knees are semi-flexed and the legs are placed in frog position. The groin area having previously been shaved is now scrubbed and painted with zephiran. A vertical skin incision is made from the inguinal ligament, at the point of pulsation of the common femoral artery, and extended distally through the skin and subcutaneous fat. The fascia overlying the adductor canal is incised and allowed to remain open.

At this point the common femoral artery 11 and vein 12 together with the saphenous vein 13 medially, and the Sartorius muscle 14 laterally are visualized in the adductor, canal.

In the proximal approach shown in FIG. 1, the femoral artery 11 is occluded both proximally and distally by the use of bulldog clamp 16 distally and inch umbilical tape 17 threaded through a one inch long, three mm. diameter rubber sleeve proximally. The umbilical tape occlusion is adjustable allowing passage. of a probecatheter 18 by loosening it. A transverse arteriotomy incision 19 is made approximately one-third the circumference of the common femoral through which the probecatheter 18 is introduced. The probecatheter 18 used is radio-opaque, 2.7 mm. in external diameter tapering to 1.6 mm., 5 cm. from the tip. This provides an extremely flexible finger tip for easier manipulation. It is to be noted that the propagation of the sound energy from the end of the probe is thorough and complete throughout the thrombus or embolus, preferably by direct contact .therewith. Because of this fact, the probe diameter does not have to correspond to the vessel size.

In the distal approach of FIG. 2, isolation of the common femoral artery 11 is carriedout. The bulldog clamp 16 is applied proximally and the inch umbilical tape threaded through a one inch long, three mm. diameter rubber sleeve distally 17. An arteriotomy is made and the probe-catheter is introduced in the same manner as in the proximal approach.

To reach a coronary artery, for example, the probecatheter may be introduced using the proximal femoral approach, and threaded up to the region of the aortic sinuses at which time the patient is placed in the left lateral prone position. Test doses of acetylcholine ranging progressively from 0.4 to 0.8 mgm. are injected through the catheter. The object being to prolong diastole to two to four seconds. Between 30 and 40 cc. of contrast material, methylglucamine diatrizoate (Renografin 76) is injected. This will permit a general coronary arteriogram for localizing the thrombus and suitable X-ray pictures for this purpose are taken and developed.

After location of the thrombus, the catheter is ma neuvered into either the anterior or posterior aortic sinuses. At this point the arteriogram films are examined to determine which coronary is occluded and the distance of the occlusion from the ostium.

With this knowledge the probe is advanced to contact the thrombus. The sound energy is now applied for a brief duration such as from 0.5 to 5 seconds. Another arteriogram (post-sonation) is made using 3 to 5 cc. of the contrast material. If the thrombus is not lysed, repeat sonation is carried out with the same dosage.

The carotid system can be approached via either femoral proximal arteriotomy or direct carotid isolation in the neck.

If the femoral approach is to be used, the previously described procedure is carried out and the probe-catheter is threaded up to the aortic arch at which point the direction is modified to enable it to enter either the left common carotid or innominate arteries. After the probecatheter has entered the appropriate artery 20 to 30 cc. of contrast material, methylglucamine diatrizoate (Renografin 76) is injected through the probe-catheter, and anterior-posterior and lateral X-rays are made.

These films will delineate occlusive processes of the innominate artery, the innominate right carotid bifurcation, the common carotid bifurcation and the entire carotid cerebral arterial tree.

Depending on the location of the occlusion, the probecatheter is threaded to it and sonation is applied for brief duration as before described. Repeat arteriography is carried out and after reading the post-sonation arterio' gram, repeat sonations are done if the occlusion has not been completely lysed.

If the direct cervical approach is chosen, the following procedure is carried out as shown in FIG. 3. Under general anesthesia the patient is placed in the supine position, turning his head slightly away from the side to be operated upon. Avoid hyper-extension of the head and neck if there is associated basilar artery insufficiency. A skin incision is madealong the anterior border of the sternmastoid muscle from one inch below the .angle of the jaw to the inferior border of the thyroid gland. The cervical fascia is incised over the carotid bulb, and the sternomastoid muscle is retracted exposing the common carotid artery, the jugular vein posteriorly and the ansa hypoglossi running over the carotid bifurcation. The common carotid artery is occluded proximally by a bulldog clamp 16 and distally by A inch umbilical tape 17 upon which is threaded a one inch long rubber sleeve. A transverse arteriotomy 37 is made in the common carotid artery, one third of the circumference. The probecatheter 18 is then threaded distally to the occlusive process and arteriography and sonation is carried out in the same manner as was described in the femoral approach to the carotid system.

The axillary approach is used for either distal or proximal threading of the probe-catheter to the subclavian axillary-brachial arterial system as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 respectively.

With the arm abducted and the elbow flexed to 90, the medial surface of the arm is prepped and a two inch incision is made 2 cm. distal to the insertion of the peetoralis major muscle and over the axillary artery. The

brachial plexus is exposed and the axillary artery and.

vein are visualized. The axillary artery is isolated by blunt dissection.

In the distal approach shown in FIG. 4, the axillary artery is occluded by a bulldog clamp 16 proximally and by a shoelace rubber tubing ligature distally 17 An arteriotomy incision is made across the artery and about /3 of its circumference. The probe-catheter 18 is threaded distally, adjusting the distal occlusive ligature 17 for passage and re-occlusion.

After the probe-catheter is within the artery, an arterio gram is made .by injecting 30 cc. of methylglucamine diatrizoate (Renografin 76) after which anterior-posterior and lateral films are made and the point of occlusion located.

The probe-catheter is advanced to the point of occlusion and sonation dosages are administered as before. If occlusion has not been cleared as shown by repeatarteriography, the sonation is repeated in the same doses as originally.

In the proximal approach shown in FIG. 5, the axillary artery is isolated as above and a bulldog clamp 16 placed distally with a shoelace rubber tubing ligature 17 proximally. An arteriotomy 86 is made transversely using Va the circumference of the artery. The probe-catheter 18 is threaded proxirnally to the point above the shoestring rubber ligature and the ligature 17 readjusted to occlude the vessel around the probe-catheter. Methylglucamine diatrizoate (Renografin 76) is injected, and an arteriogram is made as before. After locating the point of occlusion, the probe-catheter is advanced to it, and sonation is carried out. Repeat arteriograms and sonation, if required, are made.

Referring again to FIG. 3, details of the probe-catheter 18 will be described. A thin metallic probe 20 may be employed with the use of flexible tubing 30 as a sheath. The probe 20 may be constructed of stainless steel or Monel metal or any suitable metal like substance which is capable of efficient transmission of sonic or ultrasonic longitudinal vibration waves and, in addition, is flexible enough for the manipulation required in the procedure. The choice of diameter for the probe 20 will be a compromise based on these factors and, in addition, it will generally be found that the larger diameter probes are moreeifective in the lysis of major size blood clots. Obviously the diameter of the probe 20 will be limited to a size less than inner diameter of the blood vessel used to approach the blood clot.

When a radio-opaque fluid is to be employed for an arteriogram or when a fluid coolant or fluid for other purposes is required in the procedure, the flexible catheter 30 may be employed to transmit the fluid. The external end of the catheter 30 may be used for introduction of the fluid by any known technique and after the fluid has been introduced, the flexible metal probe 20 may be threaded through the interior of the catheter 30. Various obvious arrangements for the introduction and control of the fluid flow may be employed at the external end of the catheter 30.

Referring now to FIG. 6, apparatus suitable for use in the invention will be described. An ultrasonic generator 21 of the type generally available commercially is used as the source of electrical energy having control 22 for selecting the output power level and a control 23 for selecting the output frequency. The frequency range should be variable over a substantial interval such as, for example, from 10,000 to 30,000 cycles per second in order to be able to bring the entire vibrational system into resonance under all conditions of operation.

The power output requirement is generally of the order of a few tenths to a few tens of watts and in ordinary cases the lesser power of the order of a few watts is adequate. The generator 21 is preferably of the variable frequency oscillator, power-amplifier type in order to prevent loading effects from changing the frequency of the oscillator.

The generator 21 is connected by means of a cable 24 to a transducer 25 which converts the electrical oscillations into mechanical vibrations at the same frequency. For the use of these vibrations, the transducer is mechanically coupled to a metallic stud 26 Which has a threaded fitting 27 which makes a tight mechanical connection with a corresponding fitting 28 on the end of the probe 20.

As is well known in ultrasonic practice, the entire transducer and coupling assembly is made resonant by being one-half wave length long with a vibrational anti-node located at transition section 29. As is also well understood, the length of the probe 20 from the anti-node 29 should also be an integral multiple of half wavelengths in order to produce the maximum longitudinal deflection at the remote end of the probe 20. The tuning control 23 on the generator 21 may be employed to achieve the resonance anti-node at the end of the probe 20 under operating conditions.

The probe 20' is indicated as of modified construction as compared to the solid rod type probe 20 indicated in FIG. 3. In particular, the probe 20' is tubular having an axial passage 31 running its entire length and communicating with the interior of the fitting 28' at the external end thereof. With this modification, the probe 20' can be connected by means of fitting 28 to a source of fluid supply, such as the radio-opaque dye, and thus serve as a catheter for the introduction of the fluid into the body.

After the arteriogram procedure has been completed, the fitting 28' can be disconnected from the fluid supply and connected to the coupling 27 for the application of vibration energy from the transducer 25. The fluid filled passage 31 acts as an efiicient transmission medium for the longitudinal vibrations inasmuch as fluids are incompressible and relatively loss free for the transmission of vibrations.

While only a few procedures for practicing the invention have been described herein, it Will be apparent that blood clots in any location are susceptible to the procedures of the invention, if they can be exposed to ultrasonic vibrations. As used herein, ultrasonic includes the range of frequencies, including high sonic, transonic and low ultrasonic ranges and the use of any of these terms should be considered to be generic to all such frequencies. The invention, accordingly, is not limited to the particular details of the described embodiments but is defined by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. The method of lysis of blood clots in blood vessels in vivo by the application of vibrational wave energy comprising the steps of opening a blood vessel that communicates with the location of the blood clot, inserting a probe into the opening in the blood vessel, threading the probe through the blood vessel to advance the distal end thereof until the distal end of the probe is in the vicinity of the blood clot, and propagating vibrational energy through said probe to be applied to the blood clot from said distal end.

2. The method according to claim 1 in which said probe has suflicient transverse flexibility to traverse intricate pathways through the blood vessels to locate said distal end in the vicinity of the blood clot and is capable of propagating throughout its length longitudinal vibration waves to be coupled to the medium in contact with said distal end.

3. The method according to claim 1 in which said probe is a long, thin metal rod and said vibrational energy is propagated therethrough from an electromechanical transducer coupled to the proximal end of said rod outside the body of the patient.

4. The method according to claim 1 and including the step of selecting the frequency of said vibrational energy to produce an anti-node approximately at the distal end of said probe.

5. The method of lysis of blood clots in blood vessels in vivo by the application of vibrational wave energy directly to the blood clot comprising the steps of opening a blood vessel that communicates with the location of the blood clot, inserting a probe into the opening in the blood vessel, threading the probe through the blood vessel to advance the distal end thereof until the distal end of the probe is in contact with the blood clot and propagating vibrational energy through said probe to be applied to the blood clot in contact with said distal end.

6. The method according to claim 5 in which said probe has suflicient transverse flexibility to traverse intricate pathways through the blood vessels to locate said distal end at the blood clot and is capable of propagating throughout its length longitudinal vibration waves to be coupled to the medium in contact with said distal end.

7. The method according to claim 5 in which said probe is a long, thin metal rod and said vibrational energy is propagated therethrough from an electromechanical transducer coupled to the proximal end of said rod outside the body of the patient.

8. The method according to claim 5 and including the step of selecting the frequency of said vibrational energy to produce an anti-node approximately at the distal end of said probe.

9. The method of lysis of blood clotsin vivo -compris ing the steps of surgically exposing a blood vessel which provides a communicating channel to the location of the blood clot, making an incision in the exposed blood vessel, inserting a tubular flexible catheter into said blood vessel through said incision, threading the catheter through the blood vessel to the vicinity of the blood clot, threading through said catheter a probe which is capable of propagating vibrational wave energy,'injecting a small quantity of liquid radiation contrast agent through the catheter, locating the relative positions of the distal end of said probe and the blood clot by arteriography, advancing the probe until the distal end contacts the blood clot, propagating vibrational wave energy of predetermined frequency, power and duration through said probe, repeating arteriography to determine if lysis of the blood clot is complete and repeating the propagation, if necessary, of vibrational wave energy through'said probe to obtain complete lysis of the blood clot.

10. The method according to claim 9 in which said catheter is highly flexible and said probe has sufiicient transverse flexibility to transverse intricate pathways through the blood vessels guided within said catheter to locate the distal end of said probe at the blood clots, the probe being capable of propagating longitudinal vibration waves throughout its length to be applied to the blood clot in contact with said distal end.

11. The method according to claim 9 in which said probe is a long, thin metal rod and said vibrational energy is propagated therethrough from an electromechanical transducer coupled to the proximal end of said rod outside the body of the patient.

12. The method according to claim 9 and including the step of selecting the frequency of said vibrational energy to produce an anti-node approximatelyat the distal end of said probe.

13.- The method of lysis of blood clots in vivo comprising lysing the clots by the step of applying sonic vibration energy to the blood clot by a continuous propagation path which couples from a source outside the body sufiicient energy into the blood ,clot to cause lysis of the clots.

14. The method of lysis of a blood clot in vivo comprising lysing the clots by the step of applying sonic vibration energy to the blood clot with adequate energy to disperse the bloodclot and with the energy localized at the blood clot and of such magnitude as to avoid adverse effect on adjacent tissue.

15. The method of claim 14 in which the propagation path for applying said sonic energy to the blood clot is a tubular metal probe having continuous liquid medium in the tubular passage of said probe.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,283,285 5/1942 Pohlman 128---24 2,407,690 9/ 1946 Southworth 12824 2,893,395 7/1959 Buck 128-349 FOREIGN PATENTS 540,428 4/ 1922 France.

LAWRENCE W. TRAPP, Primary Examiner.

Citations de brevets
Brevet cité Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
US2283285 *25 mai 193919 mai 1942Pohlman ReimarMassage
US2407690 *16 mai 194117 sept. 1946Bell Telephone Labor IncWave guide electrotherapeutic system
US2893395 *8 févr. 19577 juil. 1959Becton Dickinson CoMedical assembly and unit for liquid transfer
FR540428A * Titre non disponible
Référencé par
Brevet citant Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
US3448741 *20 janv. 196710 juin 1969Edwards Lab IncEndarterectomy instrument
US3499436 *10 mars 196710 mars 1970Ultrasonic SystemsMethod and apparatus for treatment of organic structures with coherent elastic energy waves
US3499437 *11 sept. 196710 mars 1970Ultrasonic SystemsMethod and apparatus for treatment of organic structures and systems thereof with ultrasonic energy
US3505987 *17 mars 196714 avr. 1970Medrad IncIntra-aortic heart pump
US3565062 *13 juin 196823 févr. 1971Ultrasonic SystemsUltrasonic method and apparatus for removing cholesterol and other deposits from blood vessels and the like
US3570476 *18 nov. 196816 mars 1971David Paul GreggMagnetostrictive medical instrument
US3589363 *25 juil. 196729 juin 1971Cavitron CorpMaterial removal apparatus and method employing high frequency vibrations
US3608553 *4 sept. 196928 sept. 1971Ultrasonic SystemsUltrasonic method and apparatus for tissue grafting
US3823717 *16 avr. 197316 juil. 1974Pohlman RApparatus for disintegrating concretions in body cavities of living organisms by means of an ultrasonic probe
US4013079 *11 nov. 197522 mars 1977Lindemann Hans JoachimMedical dilator
US4040414 *12 mai 19769 août 1977Xygiene, Inc.Ultrasonic personal care instrument and method
US4526571 *15 oct. 19822 juil. 1985Cooper Lasersonics, Inc.Curved ultrasonic surgical aspirator
US4561438 *17 déc. 198431 déc. 1985Richard Wolf GmbhPiezoelectric transducer with curved shafts
US4587972 *16 juil. 198413 mai 1986Morantte Jr Bernardo DDevice for diagnostic and therapeutic intravascular intervention
US4602633 *16 nov. 198429 juil. 1986Blackstone CorporationMethods and apparatus for disintegration of urinary calculi under direct vision
US4808153 *17 nov. 198628 févr. 1989Ultramed CorporationDevice for removing plaque from arteries
US4825865 *1 mai 19872 mai 1989Jerry ZelmanApparatus and method for extracting cataract tissue
US4854325 *9 nov. 19878 août 1989Stevens Robert CReciprocating guidewire method
US4883460 *25 avr. 198828 nov. 1989Zanetti Paul HTechnique for removing deposits from body vessels
US4905672 *2 sept. 19886 mars 1990Dornier Medizintechnik GmbhThromboses formation by means of shock waves
US4962755 *21 juil. 198916 oct. 1990Heart Tech Of Minnesota, Inc.Method for performing endarterectomy
US5069664 *25 janv. 19903 déc. 1991Inter Therapy, Inc.Intravascular ultrasonic angioplasty probe
US5112339 *18 juin 199012 mai 1992Ophthalmocare, Inc.Apparatus for extracting cataractous tissue
US5139504 *22 juil. 199118 août 1992Ophthalmocare, Inc.Apparatus, system, and method for softening and extracting cataractous tissue
US5248296 *24 déc. 199028 sept. 1993Sonic Needle CorporationUltrasonic device having wire sheath
US5267954 *5 mai 19927 déc. 1993Baxter International Inc.Ultra-sound catheter for removing obstructions from tubular anatomical structures such as blood vessels
US5304115 *11 janv. 199119 avr. 1994Baxter International Inc.Ultrasonic angioplasty device incorporating improved transmission member and ablation probe
US5312328 *9 juil. 199217 mai 1994Baxter International Inc.Ultra-sound catheter for removing obstructions from tubular anatomical structures such as blood vessels
US5324255 *10 juil. 199228 juin 1994Baxter International Inc.Angioplasty and ablative devices having onboard ultrasound components and devices and methods for utilizing ultrasound to treat or prevent vasopasm
US5334183 *9 avr. 19922 août 1994Valleylab, Inc.Endoscopic electrosurgical apparatus
US5342292 *24 mai 199330 août 1994Baxter International Inc.Ultrasonic ablation device adapted for guidewire passage
US5344395 *24 janv. 19926 sept. 1994Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Apparatus for intravascular cavitation or delivery of low frequency mechanical energy
US5368557 *5 mai 199329 nov. 1994Baxter International Inc.Ultrasonic ablation catheter device having multiple ultrasound transmission members
US5368558 *3 juin 199329 nov. 1994Baxter International Inc.Ultrasonic ablation catheter device having endoscopic component and method of using same
US5380273 *19 mai 199310 janv. 1995Dubrul; Will R.Vibrating catheter
US5380274 *12 oct. 199310 janv. 1995Baxter International Inc.Ultrasound transmission member having improved longitudinal transmission properties
US5382228 *28 sept. 199317 janv. 1995Baxter International Inc.Method and device for connecting ultrasound transmission member (S) to an ultrasound generating device
US5390678 *12 oct. 199321 févr. 1995Baxter International Inc.Method and device for measuring ultrasonic activity in an ultrasound delivery system
US5397301 *19 juil. 199314 mars 1995Baxter International Inc.Ultrasonic angioplasty device incorporating an ultrasound transmission member made at least partially from a superelastic metal alloy
US5397340 *7 mai 199314 mars 1995Siemens AktiengesellschaftMethod and arrangement for implanting or explanting an intravascular catheter
US5399158 *27 janv. 199321 mars 1995The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyMethod of lysing thrombi
US5405318 *28 sept. 199311 avr. 1995Baxter International Inc.Ultra-sound catheter for removing obstructions from tubular anatomical structures such as blood vessels
US5417672 *4 oct. 199323 mai 1995Baxter International Inc.Connector for coupling an ultrasound transducer to an ultrasound catheter
US5423838 *25 juin 199313 juin 1995Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Atherectomy catheter and related components
US5427118 *4 oct. 199327 juin 1995Baxter International Inc.Ultrasonic guidewire
US5447509 *4 oct. 19935 sept. 1995Baxter International Inc.Ultrasound catheter system having modulated output with feedback control
US5474530 *8 juin 199412 déc. 1995Baxter International Inc.Angioplasty and ablative devices having onboard ultrasound components and devices and methods for utilizing ultrasound to treat or prevent vasospasm
US5490859 *29 avr. 199313 févr. 1996Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Expandable intravascular occlusion material removal devices and methods of use
US5498236 *7 oct. 199412 mars 1996Dubrul; Will R.Vibrating catheter
US5501694 *3 mars 199426 mars 1996Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Expandable intravascular occlusion material removal devices and methods of use
US5540707 *17 juin 199430 juil. 1996Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Expandable intravascular occlusion material removal devices and methods of use
US5549601 *11 oct. 199427 août 1996Devices For Vascular Intervention, Inc.Delivery of intracorporeal probes
US5549640 *8 juin 199527 août 1996Fontenot; Mark G.Device and method for enhancement of wound healing
US5792157 *30 sept. 199611 août 1998Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Expandable intravascular occlusion material removal devices and methods of use
US5836868 *25 mars 199617 nov. 1998Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Expandable intravascular occlusion material removal devices and methods of use
US5897567 *9 sept. 199727 avr. 1999Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Expandable intravascular occlusion material removal devices and methods of use
US5938633 *9 juil. 199717 août 1999Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Ultrasonic surgical devices
US6015420 *5 mars 199818 janv. 2000Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Atherectomy device for reducing damage to vessels and/or in-vivo stents
US6083192 *14 févr. 19974 juil. 2000Bath; Patricia E.Pulsed ultrasound method for fragmenting/emulsifying and removing cataractous lenses
US6156048 *2 août 19995 déc. 2000Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Atherectomy device for reducing damage to vessels and/or in-vivo stents
US618348723 oct. 19986 févr. 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Ablation device for reducing damage to vessels and/or in-vivo stents
US62581096 sept. 200010 juil. 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Guidewire bearing to prevent darting
US62705096 sept. 20007 août 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Cancave atherectomy burr with smooth rims
US62872719 janv. 199811 sept. 2001Bacchus Vascular, Inc.Motion catheter
US63287506 sept. 200011 déc. 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Trifilar atherectomy driveshaft
US63871093 août 199914 mai 2002Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and device for improving blood flow to heart of a patient
US64822166 sept. 200019 nov. 2002Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Ablation device including guidewire with abrasive tip
US650878216 août 200021 janv. 2003Bacchus Vascular, Inc.Thrombolysis device
US668908629 juil. 199910 févr. 2004Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Method of using a catheter for delivery of ultrasonic energy and medicament
US67673531 mars 200227 juil. 2004Samuel ShiberThrombectomy catheter
US6814482 *15 août 20029 nov. 2004Xerox CorporationMethod for dispersing red and white blood cells
US692963227 juin 200216 août 2005Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Ultrasonic devices and methods for ablating and removing obstructive matter from anatomical passageways and blood vessels
US69360251 nov. 200030 août 2005Bacchus Vascular, Inc.Thrombolysis device
US717926920 mai 200220 févr. 2007Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Apparatus and system for removing an obstruction from a lumen
US736456221 déc. 200529 avr. 2008Optiscan Biomedical Corp.Anti-clotting apparatus and methods for fluid handling system
US751732830 juil. 200414 avr. 2009Ahof Biophysical Systems Inc.Low frequency vibration assisted blood perfusion emergency system
US803401528 avr. 200811 oct. 2011Optiscan Biomedical CorporationAnti-clotting apparatus and methods for fluid handling system
US807996823 mai 200820 déc. 2011Ahof Biophysical Systems Inc.Vibrator with a plurality of contact nodes for treatment of myocardial ischemia
US842544411 avr. 200723 avr. 2013Optiscan Biomedical CorporationAnti-clotting apparatus and methods for fluid handling system
US847024119 mai 200825 juin 2013Optiscan Biomedical CorporationFluid injection and safety system
US872157317 févr. 200913 mai 2014Simon Fraser UniversityAutomatically adjusting contact node for multiple rib space engagement
US873436811 juil. 200827 mai 2014Simon Fraser UniversityPercussion assisted angiogenesis
US8870796 *5 avr. 201028 oct. 2014Ahof Biophysical Systems Inc.Vibration method for clearing acute arterial thrombotic occlusions in the emergency treatment of heart attack and stroke
US904456820 juin 20082 juin 2015Ekos CorporationMethod and apparatus for treatment of intracranial hemorrhages
US94152424 mars 201416 août 2016Ekos CorporationCatheter with multiple ultrasound radiating members
US957949413 mars 201428 févr. 2017Ekos CorporationMethod and apparatus for drug delivery to a target site
US963201314 sept. 201225 avr. 2017Optiscan Biomedical CorporationFluid injection and safety system
US20030009125 *27 juin 20029 janv. 2003Henry NitaUltrasonic devices and methods for ablating and removing obstructive matter from anatomical passageways and blood vessels
US20030012078 *15 août 200216 janv. 2003Xerox CorporationMethod for dispersing red and white blood cells
US20050054958 *30 juil. 200410 mars 2005Hoffmann Andrew KennethLow frequency vibration assisted blood perfusion emergency system
US20060025683 *18 janv. 20052 févr. 2006Ahof Biophysical Systems Inc.Hand-held imaging probe for treatment of states of low blood perfusion
US20070066978 *5 sept. 200622 mars 2007Schafer Mark EUltrasound medical devices and related methods
US20070083143 *21 déc. 200512 avr. 2007Optiscan Biomedical CorporationAnti-Clotting Apparatus and Methods for Fluid Handling System
US20080275371 *23 mai 20086 nov. 2008Ahof Biophysical Systems Inc.Vibrator with a plurality of contact nodes for treatment of myocardial ischemia
US20090069728 *5 nov. 200812 mars 2009Andrew Kenneth HoffmannRandomic vibration for treatment of blood flow disorders
US20090143711 *28 avr. 20084 juin 2009Braig James RAnti-clotting apparatus and methods for fluid handling system
US20100222723 *5 avr. 20102 sept. 2010Ahof Biophysical Systems Inc.Vibration method for clearing acute arterial thrombotic occlusions in the emergency treatment of heart attack and stroke
US20110224582 *24 mai 201115 sept. 2011Spence Paul AMethods related to diverting material in blood flow away from the head
WO1989006515A1 *23 janv. 198927 juil. 1989Jonathan BernsteinSystem for angioplasty and ultrasonic contrast imaging
WO1996039955A1 *11 oct. 199519 déc. 1996Dubrul Will RVibrating catheter
WO2007044054A1 *13 févr. 200619 avr. 2007Optiscan Biomedical CorporationAnti-clotting apparatus and methods for fluid handling system
Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis601/2, 606/159, 606/200, 604/22
Classification internationaleA61B17/22, A61B19/00, A61B18/00
Classification coopérativeA61B2019/5433, A61B17/22012, A61B2018/00011
Classification européenneA61B17/22B2