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Numéro de publicationUS3451913 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication24 juin 1969
Date de dépôt3 mars 1966
Date de priorité3 mars 1965
Autre référence de publicationDE1283623B
Numéro de publicationUS 3451913 A, US 3451913A, US-A-3451913, US3451913 A, US3451913A
InventeursEmile Laborde, Jean Zilberman
Cessionnaire d'origineCit Alcatel
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Dissoluble wall structure
US 3451913 A
Résumé  disponible en
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Revendications  disponible en
Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

June 24, 1969 E. LABORDE ETAL DISSOLUBLE WALL STRUCTURE Filed March a, 1966 awn/mes EMILE LRBORDE EnN Z/LBGEMRA/ United States Patent 3,451,913 DISSOLUBLE WALL STRUCTURE Emile Laborde and Jean Zilberman, Paris, France, assiguors to C.I.T.-Compagnie Industrielle des Telecommunications, Paris, France Filed Mar. 3, 1966, Ser. No. 531,593 Claims priority, applicati7on France, Mar. 3, 1965,

7, 98 Int. Cl. C23b 1/02 US. Cl. 204-248 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The present invention relates to a device susceptible to bring about the piercing of a wall of a body floating on a liquid after a duration of immersion comprised within certain limits.

There exist certain cases in which a three-dimensional body is intended to float on a liquid, then at the end of a certain time, to lose its floatability and to sink to the bottom. This is the case in particular with certain carrier apparatus for detection devices whose role is to float on the ocean during a certain time and thereafter to sink to the bottom at the end of some hours of operation of said devices,

There are already known in the prior art means to cause a body floating on the ocean to lose its floatability, particularly by way of dissolution or by way of electrochemical corrosion. In the first case at least one dissolvable plug or stopper, constituted, for example, by a mineral salt, is inserted into an aperture made into the enclosure below the water line. The nature of the product and the dimensions of the aperture are chosen in such a manner that the dissolution takes place from one side to the other, i.e., through and through at the end of a time, which, taking into consideration the variations of the parameters such as temperature of the water, degree of salinity, is comprised within the prescribed limits, for example, between 3 and 30 hours. One may also realize an element or portion of the wall constituted by a small plate of a first metal on which is deposited, preferably by electroplating, a layer of a second metal susceptible of forming with the first metal a galvanic couple. In the presence of the conductive sea water, the small plate and the metallic layer behave like an electric battery, producing a certain current giving rise to an electrolytic attack of the plate which leads finally to the piercing of the wall.

Such a small plate may be obtained in an advantageous manner, for example, by a deposit of gold on zinc.

However, experience has demonstrated that such a battery element formed by a plate of a metal covered by another plated metal, exposed to the sea water, has a tendency for the so-called passivation phenomenon by the formation of compounds insoluble within the medium and electrically insulating, which enclosure or surround the surface, thereby increasing enormously the internal resistance of the cell, and slowing down the speed of dissolution. An extreme dispersion of the piercing duration results therefrom which may even exceed the maximum admissible limit.

This is the reason why, according to the present in- 3,451,913 Patented June 24, 1969 vention, a wall element intended to constitute an assembly to be pierced by immersion into the sea comprises two metallic parts of different metal, separated by an insulating medium and connected externally by a conductor. In this manner, the electrolysis takes place regularly and furnishes, with a dispersion of the duration reduced to a minimum, the desired piercing of the wall.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a floating structure of the type described above which eliminates by simple means the shortcomings and drawbacks encountered with the prior art constructions.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a wall structure for a floating body which assures the dedesired termination of the floata'bility thereof within the given time limits after immersion into the salt water of the sea.

A further object of the present invention resides in a dissolvable wall structure for a floating body which is not only simple in construction and reliable in operation but which also assures proper functioning thereof within the given time limits.

These and further objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will become more obvious from the following description when taken in connection with the accompanying drawing which shows, in the single figure thereof, for purposes of illustration only, one embodiment in accordance with the present invention, and where- 1n:

The single figure is a partial cross-sectional view through a floating body provided with a dissolvable wall structure in accordance with the present invention.

Referring now to the single figure of the drawings, ref erence numeral 2 designates therein a portion of a wall of an enclosure or vessel capable of floating. The bottom of the wall 2 comprises an aperture in the embossment or recess 3 thereof, formed "by a galvanic element comprising a plate 1 of a first metal or alloy and a counterplate 4 through which is pierced a central opening or aperture, made of a metal or alloy dilferent from the first metal and presenting another oxidation potential. The plate 1 and the counterplate 4 are spaced from one an other by an insulating layer or element 5 extending over the entire or at least a portion of the mutually facing surfaces; the plate 1 and the counterplate 4 are in electrical contact along the external circumference by the intermediary of a conductor 6. To avoid the corrosion of the plate 1 during storage, the em'bossment or recess 3 accommodating the galvanic element in accordance with the present invention is sealed by an impermeable or water-repellent skin or cover 7 having an annular adhesive zone adhering to the external surface of the wall 2. The skin or cover 7 which will be torn off at the moment of use of the apparatus may be made of rubber or a flexible synthetic plastic resin of any known nature.

In the presence of a conductive liquid, for example, saline water of the ocean, an electric battery is constituted thereby with the plate .1 and the counterplate 4 as electrodes connected by an external circuit formed by the conductor 6 which may be in the form of an annular shaped conductor welded to the peripheral edges of the plate 1 and the counterplate 4.

The substances forming the electrodes of the battery thus constituted are chosen in such a manner that the polarity of their couple is such that there will be corrosion of the electrode formed by the plate 1.

In one preferred embodiment of the present invention, the plate 1 is made of magnesium and the counterplate 4 of zinc.

1f the wall 2 of the enclosure is metallic, the metallic substances forming the elements 1 and 6 are chosen in such a manner that the elfect of the difl'erent galvanic couples created with the metal of the wall 2 reinforce the piercing effect of the galvanic element described here inabove.

When the corrosion has taken place over the entire thickness of the plate 1, the wall of the enclosure becomes perforated.

The insulating material 5 is chosen in particular for its water-repellent properties in order that its surface resistivity is little sensitive to the moisture of the air in the normal storage condiions and that thus no galvanic corrosion takes place prior to actually putting the device into service. It may be of any non-hygroscopic, insulating substance, in particular, Mylar. Its thickness must be sufiicient in order that the metallic surfaces facing each other are effectively insulated.

The skin or cover 7 may be, for example, of polyethylene.

A wall equipped with a surface element according to the present invention presents a duration of the piercing which can be readily reproduced for the same value of parameters. This duration varies as a function of the temperature and conductivity of the liquid medium, and in particular, of the degree of salinity of the ocean water, in the most frequent case of application in which the enclosure to be pierced floats on the ocean.

While we have shown and described one embodiment in accordance with the present invention, it is understood that the same is not limited thereto but is susceptible of numerous changes and modifications as known to a person skilled in the art, and we therefore do not wish to be limited to the details shown and described herein but intend to cover all such changes and modifications as are encompassed by the scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A metallic structure capable of being destroyed by a continuous contact with an electrolyte, comprising:

afirst substantially circular metallic plate structure,

a layer of insulating material disposed over a substantially annular surface of said first plate structure,

a second annular plate structure of a metal different from said first plate structure, said second plate structure being disposed on said layer of insulating material so that mutually facing surface portions of said first and second plate structures are separated by said insulating material, and a substantially annular shaped conductor means connected to said first and second plate structure along their peripheral edges.

2. The combination according to claim 1, wherein said first plate structure is made of magnesium, said second plate structure of zinc, and said insulating material is non-hygroscopic.

3. The combination according to claim 1, wherein said conductor means is welded to said first and second plate structures along their peripheral edges.

4. The combination according to claim 3, which further includes a removable cover means disposed over said second plate structure to preclude an electrolyte from contacting said first and second plate structures and said conductor means until said cover is removed.

5. A metallic structure capable of being destroyed by a continuous contact with an electrolyte, comprising:

a substantially circular magnesium plate structure,

a layer of non-hygroscopic insulating material disposed over a substantially annular surface of said first plate structure,

a substantially annular zinc plate structure being disposed on said layer of insulating material, the periphery of said zinc plate structure substantially following the periphery of said insulating material and said magnesium plate structure, and

a substantially annular shaped conductor means connected to said magnesium and zinc plate structures along their peripheral edges.

6. The combination according to claim 5, wherein said conductor means is welded to said magnesium and Zinc plate structures along their peripheral edges.

7. The combination according to claim 6, which further includes a removable cover means disposed over said zinc plate structure to preclude an electrolyte from contacting said Zinc and magnesium plate structures and said conductor means until said cover is removed.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1/1961 Skinner 136- 3/1967 Suleski 204-196 US. Cl. X.R.

Citations de brevets
Brevet cité Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
US2968688 *10 avr. 195817 janv. 1961Gen Motors CorpRain sensor
US3308046 *6 févr. 19637 mars 1967Hazeltine Research IncGalvanic action device for scuttling floating objects
Référencé par
Brevet citant Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
US4863578 *25 avr. 19885 sept. 1989Corrosion Service Company LimitedCorrodible link for cathodic protection systems
US5358617 *16 nov. 199225 oct. 1994Makiko YoshidaSelf-contained water treatment device
US5368704 *6 août 199329 nov. 1994Teknekron CorporationMicro-electrochemical valves and method
US5480522 *4 janv. 19942 janv. 1996Makiko YoshidaSelf-energizing fluid treatment apparatus employing external electrodes
Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis204/248, 429/119
Classification internationaleC23F13/02, B63B22/10, F42B22/22, H01M6/34
Classification coopérativeB63B22/10, F42B22/22, H01M6/34, C23F13/02, Y02E60/12
Classification européenneC23F13/02, F42B22/22, B63B22/10, H01M6/34