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Numéro de publicationUS3609210 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication28 sept. 1971
Date de dépôt26 juin 1970
Date de priorité26 juin 1970
Numéro de publicationUS 3609210 A, US 3609210A, US-A-3609210, US3609210 A, US3609210A
InventeursGuritz Kenneth Edwin
Cessionnaire d'origineGuritz Kenneth Edwin
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Multiple service floor box
US 3609210 A
Images(2)
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Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Kenneth Edwin Guritz 570 Emerald Harbor Drive, Sarasota, Fla. 33577 [21] Appl. No. 50,119

[22] Filed June 26, 1970 [45] Patented Sept. 28, 1971 [54] MULTIPLE SERVICE FLOOR BOX 8 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 174/49, 52/221, 174/96, 220/34 [51] int. Cl H02g 3/08, H02g 3/28 [50] Field of Search 174/48, 49,

50,5l,53,57,68C,70C,71 R,72R, 72C, 95-98, 101; 138/92, 103, 111, 105, 115, 116, 117; 52/221;220/3.2,3.3,3.4,3.94

Primary Examiner-Laramie E. Askin Attorney.lohn C. Albrecht ABSTRACT: A floor service fitting for use with cellular steel floor building construction. The service fitting comprises a base member having two isolated compartments. The base member is proportioned to bridge between two cells of the cellular steel floor. The bottom of each compartment has a relatively large opening. Corresponding openings are placed in adjacent cells of the cellular steel floor and the base is secured with the openings in the two compartments directly above the openings in the adjacent cells. The base is securely anchored to the adjacent cells to provide a good mechanical and electrical connection. The two isolated compartments are separated by an integral divider which has an elongated slot along the length thereof for receiving a metal separator. The service fitting further comprises a cap member which is adapted to be physically and electrically secured to the base member and comprises a relatively large opening centered above the divider. The cap member and the base member in one instance are proportioned so that the upper surface of the cap member coincides with the upper surface of the concrete which is poured over the cellular floor. In another example, a separate adjustable member is adapted to engage the cap member and its upper surface coincides with the upper surface of the concrete.

PATENTEDSEP28I9?! 3.609.210

SHEETIUFZ v INVENTOR -K. E. GURITZ MQAW ATTORNEY PATENTE'nsarzelsn 3,609,210

SHEET 2 0F 2 FIG. 2

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MULTIPLE SERVICE FLOOR BOX FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a multiple service fitting for a cellular steel floor system. More particularly, this invention relates to a preset floor service fitting which bridges between two cells of a steel floor and provides for a plurality of building services (e.g., electrical and communication services) from a single service fitting.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Cellular steel floor systems comprise cellular steel members termed panels which are supported upon spaced-apart joists. The cellular steel members comprise a substantially flat under surface and a plurality of formed elongated channel members which are attached to the flat surface member to form a plurality of longitudinal channels above the flat surface member. The attached members serve to strengthen the flat surface member and to provide passages for air, electrical power services, communication services and incidental building signaling services. Concrete is poured over the supported panels to form a load-bearing floor-ceiling structure.

Heretofore the cells of a cellular steel floor system have been activated as individual entities on an afterset or preset basis. The method of activating a cellular steel floor system generally is to cut a core from the concrete fill (2% inches or more), cut a hole in the top of a channel member of the cellular floor panel, remove the cutaway portion of the steel panel and install an afterset insert. Subsequently, electrical service wires, telephone wires or electrical signal wires are pulled through the channel into which the insert has been placed. The cost of installing afterset inserts is extremely high and the installation job is slow and disruptive to building occupants. Furthermore, the activation of a cellular steel floor on a single cell basis provides service for only one of the three or more possible services.

Cellular steel floors which have concrete poured over the cellular panels provide strong commercial floors with a minimum of temporary supporting structures to facilitate the installation of such floors. Additionally, the cellular steel floor system provides a network of cells throughout the entire floor surface. The cells may be interconnected by a system of header ducts which provide for passing services between cells serving the same service, e.g., electrical power service.

Heretofore parallel electrical and telephone conduits or ducts have been formed together and placed in a flat plate concrete floor. Such arrangements are costly, do not add to the structural strength of the floor and are available only at planned locations within the floor surface.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with this invention, a single dual-service fitting bridges between two adjacent cells of a cellular steel floor system and provides access to two different types of building services through a single opening in the floor surface.

It is an object of this invention to provide access to two differentbuilding services through a single floor surface opening without detracting from the structural integrity of a cellular steel floor system.

It is another object of this invention to economically provide for dual building service facilities on a random or regular basis within the entire floor surface area of a concrete floor.

In accordance with one feature of this invention, a dual-service floor service box comprises two different chambers with an integrally formed dividing member formed so as to provide for a maximum cross section of concrete between the joined cells in the region under the base member.

In accordance with another feature of this invention, any two adjacent floor cells may be bridged by my dual-service floor service fitting to provide for access to two different building services (c.g., electrical power service and communication service) at any location within the floor surface.

The above and other objects and features of my invention may be more readily understood by reference to the following description when read with respect to the drawing in which:

FIG. I is a view ofa portion ofa cellular steel floor showing my dual-service fitting bridging two adjacent cells of a floor panel with and without concrete in place over the floor panel;

FIG. 2 is a detailed drawing of one embodiment of my dual service fitting along with an above-surface mounted outlet box for bringing electrical power and communication services to a user's location; and

FIG. 3 is another embodiment of my invention wherein an electrical service outlet is mounted approximately level with the concrete floor and protector plates are placed above the floor to protect electrical appliance cords and to protect communication cables which are brought from my dual-service fitting.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION A panel of a cellular steel floor is shown in FIG. 1. The left portion of FIG. 1 shows a cellular steel floor panel with a single preset insert 130 and a multiple-service fitting in place prior to the pouring of the concrete fill over the cellular panel. The right portion of FIG. 1 shows a multiple-service fitting over two of the three cells 102, 103, 104 of the panel 101 and shows the concrete fill in place over the panel and over the service box. Additionally, in the right side of FIG. I there is shown an above-surface outlet box attached to the multipleservice box to provide for electrical power and telephone services through a single outlet box. Corresponding elements in the left and right sides of FIG. 1 are similarly labeled to show their correspondence. However, the labels of the elements which are shown covered by fill in the right side of FIG. I each include the suffix A.

As priorly discussed herein, cellular steel floors with concrete fill have been energized on a single cell basis by means of preset or afterset inserts such as I30. In accordance with my invention, I provide a multiple-service fitting which bridges between two cells, e.g., cells 103 and I04. My multiple-service fitting comprises a base I05 which comprises two isolated compartments positioned respectively above the two adjacent floor cells and a cap 106 which serves to substantially complete the two isolated compartments. The bottom surface of the base member 105 has two openings I08 and 109 which are positioned above corresponding openings in the cells I04 and 103. In one embodiment of my multiple-service fitting, the bottom surface comprises two plane portions 112 and 113 which lie adjacent to and parallel with the upper surface of the cells 104 and 103, respectively. The two plane portions I12 and 113 are separated by a curved surface 111. An internal curved surface corresponding generally to the curved surface 11] provides an integrally formed divider between the two compartments of the base of my box. The upper portion of the divider, which is labeled 107 in FIG. 1, is slotted to receive a flat separator plate which extends into the divided outlet box to physically and electrically separate the different services.

The cap 106 of my multiple service fitting has a relatively large threaded opening which provides access to the two isolated compartments. It should be noted that the opening 110 is positioned approximately centered over the divider 107.

As will be described in greater detail with respect to FIG. 2, the internal surface of the divider I07 slopes from a point near the upper surface of the divider 107 to the internal bottom surface of each of the isolated compartments. Accordingly, wires and cables will tend to follow this sloped surface to facilitate the pulling of electrical services wires, telephone wires, signal wires, etc. Additionally, as seen in FIG. I, the internal surface of the cap 106 is raised so as to maximize the distance between the internal surface of the divider and the aperture 110 of the cap and the aperture 110 of the cap I06.

The attachment of the base 105 to the cells, such as 103 and 104, to provide good physical and electrical connections, may

be accomplished in any one of a number of ways. Various methods of attachment are illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. In FIG. 2, it is seen that the base 205 of my box comprises integrally formed sleeve portions 250 and 251. These sleeves are adapted to be deformed outwardly and thus provide a smooth rolled surface inside the respective cells 203 and 204. The sleeve portions 250 and 251 may advantageously be deformed through the use of my attaching apparatus which is fully described in my U.S. Pat. No. 3,289,287 which issued on Dec. 6, 1966. FIG. 2 more clearly shows the details of the interior surfaces of the two isolated compartments. Additionally, in FIG. 2 there is shown an adapter sleeve 260 which serves to physically and electrically attach the divided outlet box 220 to my multiple-service fitting. The sleeve 260 has external threads which engage the internal threads of aperture 210 and internal threads of the base 261 of the divided outlet box 220.

The divided outlet box 220 is shown in plan view with a grommet 262 through which the telephone cable 263 may pass without damage; and an electrical service outlet 265. The outlet box 220 is physically and electrically divided into two compartments by means of the divider 264. The details of this divider are not shown. However, it is shaped so as to pass through the sleeve 260 and to engage the slot in the divider 207 of the base 205. Above the upper surface of the sleeve 260, the divider 264 is proportioned to divide the interior of the outlet box 220 into two physically isolated compartments, one for telephone services and one for electrical services. The divider 264 is shown in FIG. 2 terminating at the inner surface at the top of the box 220. However, the divider 264 may further comprise a return flange which parallels the upper surface of the box 220 and serves to further cover the electrical outlet 265.

As shown in FIG. 2, the cap 206 may be secured to the base 205 by the screws 270, 271. It is not essential that screws be used for this purpose since other methods of attachment, such as snaps, etc., may provide an adequate physical and electrical connection. However, since electrical continuity must be provided between the outlet box 220 and the cells, such as 203 and 204, the method of attachment must be capable of retaining a secure electrical connection between the cap and the base over prolonged periods of time. The same requirement applies to the attachment of the base 205 to the cells 250 and 251. The electrical connection from the outlet box 220 to the floor cells, such as 204, must be of low resistance in order to provide maximum safety to occupants of the building in which my multiple-service fitting is installed. Accordingly, although the base 205 may be attached to the cells, such as 203 and 204, by means other than my insert attaching tool, care must be taken to assure that a long-term, low-resistance and relatively high-current connection be established between the base 205 and the cells 203, 204.

As shown in FIG. 3, the base 305 may be attached to the cell 303 by means of a screw 381 or, alternatively, the base 305 may be attached to the cell 304 by a rivet 382. Additionally, the base 305 may be welded to the floor cells. A rivet, such as 382, may have a smooth head surface facing the interior of the cell 304. However, where sheet metal screws, such as 381, are employed, these may create an abraiding surface for conductors passed through a cell; therefore, care must be taken to assure that such screws are not of excessive length.

In FIGS. 2 and 3, the caps 206 and 306 are proportioned so that their upper surfaces in the region of the apertures 210 and 310 coincide with the upper surface of the concrete fill. This situation may exist for any thickness of concrete fill. However, for each possible concrete fill thickness, cap members, e.g., 206, 306, of appropriate dimensions must be provided. Alternatively, height-adjusting rings (not shown) may be employed to bring the cap, e.g., 206, 306, to a dimension compatible with the total concrete fill.

As shown in FIG. 2, the concrete till 290 between the cells 203, 204 and the curved under surface 211 of the base 205 is maximized. This advantageously facilitates the flow of concrete under and around the base 205 and, therefore,

enhances the strength of the concrete fill in the region of the service boxes.

It may be noted that the cells 203 and 204 of FIG. 2 have sloped sides, while the cells 303 and 304 of FIG. 3 have approximately vertical sides. These cell shapes correspond to the products of different manufacturers and my multiple-service box may be employed to advantage with floor cells of these and different configurations. In the case of one floor panel manufacturer, deep ridges are formed in the flat upper surface of the individual cells to improve the structural performance thereof. The sleeves 250, 251, when deformed with the attaching tool of my aforenoted US. Pat. No. 3,289,287, provide a good physical and electrical connection even though such deformations may exist in the cell surfaces.

In FIG. 3, there is shown a multiple-service box which corresponds generally in details to the multiple service box of FIGS. 1 and 2. However, in the box of FIG. 3, the compartment which is intended for communication service is substantially larger than the compartment which is reserved for electrical power service. Additionally, in FIG. 3, the electrical service outlet 365 is mounted directly within the compartment reserved for electrical service and its face is parallel to and substantially in alignment with the floor surface. The larger compartment which is reserved for communication service is proportioned to receive and store a relatively large circuit connector. Both compartments are covered with a plate 391 and protectors 392 and 393. The protectors 392 and 393 serve to prevent accidental removal of the electrical cord from the electrical outlet 365 and to generally prevent damage to the electrical and communication cables. The plate 391 is secured physically and electrically to the base 305 by means of screws 395 and rests on a ledge of the adapter ring 394. The ledge of the adapter ring prevents accidental deformation of the plate 391. The protectors 392 and 393 may be held in place by the screws 395.

What is claimed is:

1. In a cellular steel-concrete floor-ceiling structure comprising a plurality of spaced-apart elongated cells substantially parallel to each other, each cell being formed of metal and having a substantially flat upper surface parallel to the floor surface of said structure, the improvement comprising:

a multiple-service fitting physically attached to adjacent cells of said floor-ceiling structure over access openings in said upper surfaces of said adjacent cells; said service fitting comprising an integrally formed base member comprising two chambers, said chambers each comprising a flat floor means with an aperture therethrough corresponding to said access opening in said cells; and enclosing walls extending upwardly from said floor means of said chambers for completing the sides of said chambers; an integrally formed divider means extending upwardly from said floor means of said chambers to isolate said chambers from each other, said divider means comprising an elongated portion protruding above the upper surfaces of said walls and having means for receiving a service divider means; and a cap member comprising a substantially flat surface portion engaging said upper surfaces of said walls of said base member, an integrally formed annular member positioned in said flat surface portion so as to be approximately centered over said elongated portion of said divider means, said annular member extending upwardly from said substantially flat surface portion of said cap member to the plane of said floor surface of said structure; means electrically and physically connecting said cap member to said base member; and means in said annular means for securing a multiple-service outlet box thereto.

2. A cellular steel-concrete floor-ceiling structure in accordance with claim 1 wherein said base member further comprises an annular means downwardly depending from each of said floor means, said annular means having an outside diameter corresponding roughly to the diameter of said access openings, the length of said annular means being greater than the thickness of the flat upper surface of said cells so as to protrude inside said cells, and the walls of said annular means being proportioned such that said annular means admits of mechanical working thereof to provide a smooth rolled surface connection to said cell.

3. A cellular steel-concrete floor-ceiling structure in accordance with claim 1 wherein said cap member further comprises walls downwardly depending from said substantially flat surface portion, said walls being proportioned to cover a portion of the outside surfaces of said enclosing walls of said base so as to preclude the flow of concrete into said chambers while said floor is being cast.

4. A cellular steel-concrete floor-ceiling structure in accordance with claim 1 wherein the outside surface of said integrally formed divider means forms an inverted truncated V joining the outside surfaces of said floor means so as to facilitate the flow of concrete under said divider means of said base member.

5. A cellular steel-concrete floor-ceiling structure in accordance with claim 1 wherein said flat surface portion of said cap member is deformed upwardly over said apertures in said chambers, said deformation extending vertically so as to cut through portions of said annular member to facilitate access to said cells through said apertures in said floor means of said chambers.

6. In a cellular steel-concrete floor-ceiling structure comprising a plurality of spaced-apart elongated cells substantially parallel to each other, each cell being formed of metal and having a substantially flat upper surface parallel to the floor surface of said structure, the improvement comprising:

a multiple service fitting physically attached to adjacent cells of said floor-ceiling structure over access openings in said upper surfaces of said adjacent cells; said service fitting comprising an integrally formed base member comprising two chambers, said chambers each comprising a flat floor means with an aperture therethrough corresponding to said access opening in said cells; and enclosing walls extending upwardly from said floor means of said chambers for completing the sides of said chambers; an integrally formed divider means extending upwardly from said floor means of said chambers to isolate said chambers from each other, said divider means comprising an elongated portion protruding above the upper surfaces of said walls and having means for receiving a service divider means; and a cap member comprising a substantially flat surface portion engaging said upper surfaces of said walls of said base member, an integrally formed annular member positioned in said flat surface portion so as to be approximately centered over said elongated portion of said divider means, said annular member extending upwardly from said substantially flat surface portion of said cap member to the plane of said floor surface of said structure; means electrically and physically connecting said cap member to said base member; means in one of said chambers for receiving an electrical outlet within said one chamber such that said outlet is accessible through the opening in said annular member; covering means covering said opening to protect said electrical outlet and conductors which are to enter said chambers; and means in said cap member securing said covering means thereto. 7. A cellular steel-concrete floor-ceiling structure in accordance with claim 6 wherein said base member further comprises an annular means downwardly depending from each of said floor means, said annular means having an outside diameter corresponding roughly to the diameter of said access openings, the length of said annular means being greater than the thickness of the flat upper surface of said cells so as to protrude inside said cells, and the walls of said annular means being proportioned such that said annular means admits of mechanical working thereof to provide a smooth rolled surface connection to said cell.

8. A cellular steel-concrete floor-ceiling structure m accordance with claim 6 wherein said covering means comprises a pair of covers for protecting said conductors which are to enter said two chambers.

Citations de brevets
Brevet cité Date de dépôt Date de publication Déposant Titre
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US3514525 *14 oct. 196826 mai 1970Textron IncSingle and dual service fittings
NL6516466A * Titre non disponible
Référencé par
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Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis174/482, 174/96, 220/3.4, 52/220.1
Classification internationaleH02G3/18
Classification coopérativeH02G3/185
Classification européenneH02G3/18B