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Numéro de publicationUS3683889 A
Type de publicationOctroi
Date de publication15 août 1972
Date de dépôt2 sept. 1970
Date de priorité16 sept. 1969
Autre référence de publicationDE2042693A1
Numéro de publicationUS 3683889 A, US 3683889A, US-A-3683889, US3683889 A, US3683889A
InventeursHoffman Viktoria
Cessionnaire d'origineHoffman Viktoria
Exporter la citationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Liens externes: USPTO, Cession USPTO, Espacenet
Heating container
US 3683889 A
Résumé
A vessel has a boundary wall defining a cavity which contains a liquid. A heating insert is in heat-conducting relation with said cavity and defines a heating compartment adjoining said boundary wall and containing a heat-delivering substance which is capable of performing an exothermic reaction. An outer drinking container contains said vessel and insert. Said outer container and vessel consist of a sufficiently heat-resisting material, which consists at least in part of plastics material.
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Description  (Le texte OCR peut contenir des erreurs.)

United States Patent Hoffman 1 1 HEATING CONTAlNER [72] Inventor: Viktoria Holfman, Maurus Gordon- Strasse 12, Garsten, Austria [22] Filed: Sept. 2, 1970 211 App]. No.: 68,871

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Sept. 16, 1969 Austria ..A 8751/69 [52] US. Cl ..126/263, 126/262 51 Int. Cl. ..F24j 1/00 [58] Field of Search ..126/262, 263

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,850,166 3/1932 Bell ..126/263 X 2,300,793 1 1/1942 Martin 126/263 3,079,91 1 3/1963 Ryan et a1 126/263 1 1 Aug. 15, 1972 3,561,424 2/1971 Failla 126/263 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 856,079 3/1940 France 126/262 158,259 3/1940 Austria 126/263 Primary Examiner-Charles .l. Myhre Altomey--Kurt Kelman v 1 1 ABSTRACT A vessel has a boundary wall defining a cavity which contains a liquid. A heating insert is in heat-conducting relation with said cavity and defines a heating compartment adjoining said boundary wall and containing a heat-delivering substance which is capable of performing an exothermic reaction. An outer drinking container contains said vessel and insert. Said outer container and vessel consist of a sufficiently heat-resisting material, which consists at least in part of plastics material.

37 Claims, 17 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAus 15 m2 SHEET 1 BF 4 FIG AR WK TOR/4 HoFFMn vN PATENTEDAUE 1 \m 3.683; 889

SHEET 2 [1F 4 PATENTEDAUB 15 1912 SHEET Q 0F 4 I N VEN 7 UR,

vmranm "arr v My Wwv 7(Mw HGENT HEATING CONTAINER This invention relates to a heating container for use in the preparation of liquid foodstuffs, beverages and similar liquid or semiliquid substances or preparations to be used in a hot state, such as medicaments, glues to be applied in a hot state, etc. Such products will be referred to hereinafter as "beverages for the sake of simplicity. More particularly, the invention relates to a heating container which comprises a vessel for holding the beverage and a heating insert, which is in heat-conducting connection with the contents of the vessel and contains a substance which is capable of reacting with a delivery of heat.

Known heating containers of that kind have been successful only for special purposes. These known heating containers are similar in form to the usual cans or tins for foodstuffs and it is necessary to pour the heated contents of the vessel into a drinking vessel or to consume the heated contents of the vessel through a drinking straw. The wall of the tin or can is heated to a high temperature so that it is difficult to touch the heated tin or can. Known heating containers are suitable only for beverages which can be stored in their final state and for this reason cannot be used for heating a large number of beverages, such as coffee or tea, which suffer in taste or become unpalatable as a result of fermentation and the like when stored in a prepared form. The taste of stored beverages is also adversely affected because the heating containers are made from tinned iron. Finally, the substances taking part in the exothermic reaction are sometimes dangerous so that substantial safety precautions are required to avoid an explosion when the exothermic reaction has been initiated and to prevent an ingress of toxic substances into the beverage. The thermal reaction is normally initiated by a breaking of vessels or by a release of detonators by means of a trigger; these operations are fairly complicated. Those parts of the heating and safety means which must be provided regardless of the sire of the heating container involve very high manufacturing costs so that for these reasons alone the known heating containers are economical only if the vessel has a very high cubic capacity. In view of the above considerations, it has been the general practice previously to prepare hot beverages in a conventional manner by means of an external source of heat and a hot beverage is not consumed unless such source of heat is available.

It is also known to prepare cold beverages, particularly lemonades or coffee, in discardable containers in the form of cups or bottles, which have a compartment containing a soluble extract. A closure is provided which can be torn open to contact said extract with a liquid filled into the container so that the extract dissolves in the liquid.

It is an object of the invention so to modify and improve a heating container of the kind defined first hereinbefore that it constitutes an economical package for hot beverages to be dispensed in small portions, enables a simple and safe manipulation, does not adversely affect the taste of the beverage and enables a preparation of beverages which cannot be stored or can be stored only with restrictions.

This object is accomplished according to the invention in that the entire container constitutes a drinking container, the cavity of the vessel contains a small portion of the beverage, the container and the vessel are made of a material which has the required heat-resisting qualifies and consists at least in part of plastics material, and the heat-delivering substance is accommodated in a compartment which adjoins at least one boundary wall of the cavity of the vessel.

Because the container itself is used as a drinking container, it can be handled in a simple manner as separate drinking vessels and drinking straws are no longer required.

The entire container may consist of plastics material sheeting, foamed plastics material sheeting or thinwalled injection-molded plastics material as well as of metal foil, particularly aluminum foil, coated with plastics material or with heat-scalable varnish, similarly coated paper, or pulp or fiber material which has been coated with plastics material and compression-molded into the desired shape. The outer container may consist of transparent plastics material, such as impact-resistant polystyrene. The outer container may be made in a shape which resembles a conventional drinking vessel, such as a cup or tin or can, or the container may be made from plastics material sheeting or foil which is folded into the form of a box or bag, which is provided with drinking fittings and the like. Regardless of the form of the outer container, it is recommendable to separate the heat-delivering substance from the cavity of the vessel by a metal foil, particularly an aluminum foil, because the same has a higher thermal conductivity. That foil may be provided with a coating of plastics material or heat-scalable varnish at least on that side which faces the cavity of the vessel so that the taste of the beverage will not be adversely affected. Such foil can easily be joined by heat-sealing, welding or adhering to the remaining part of the vessel, which is similarly coated or consists of a suitable material. If the outer container is made from heat-insulating material, such as a sheeting of foamed plastics material having a liquid-tight inside coating, heat losses will be prevented, the heated vessel can be grasped and the heated contents can be drunk from the vessel.

For many applications, it will be recommendable to combine the heat-delivering substance and the means for initiating their reaction in a heating insert, which has a predetermined heat delivery capacity and can be accon'unodated in different containers. Solid or liquid reactants may be used for the exothermic reaction and the latter may be a physical or chemical reaction. For instance, the heat of recrystallization of various suitable substances may be used to generate heat. From among the large number of substances which are capable of reaction exothermically when contacting each other, potassium permanganate and glycerin may be mentioned by way of example. When these components are mixed or contacted with each other, their temperature will rise rapidly and up to a maximum of about C. If sorbitol is added to at least one of these components in the same state of matter as the respective component, the heat-generating capacity will be increased so that a smaller amount of heat-delivering substance will be suflicient to heat a given amount of liquid. At the temperature which have been mentioned, a sufficient heat resistance of the container material is required only immediately adjacent to the heating insert. In that area, the container consists suitably of metal foil. The remaining container must be made of a material which resists the temperature to which the beverage may be heated. This temperature may be as high as 68 C. in the case of coffee or tea. The heatdelivering capacity of the heating insert depends on the amount of thermal energy required to heat the contents of the vessel to the desired temperature, taking the temperature into account at which the heating container is stored before use. For a given amount of a given beverage, heating containers which are used outdoors in winter or which are stored in a refrigerator or the like before use must be provided with a heating insert having a higher heat delivery capacity than heating containers which are used in summer or which are stored at higher temperatures. When it is desired to avoid the use of different packages for these different uses, the last-mentioned embodiment may be provided with two compartments for each of the reactants for the exothermic reaction and with separate triggers for establishing a communication between the respective compartments so that the actuation of one trigger results in the generation of a basic heat quantity and the actuation of the second trigger results in the generation of an additional heat quantity in case of a low initial temperature. In this embodiment, the sorbitol may be accommodated in a separate compartment and a separate trigger may be provided to connect said separate compartment to the two other compartments so that the heat delivery capacity of the heating insert is increased as required.

Further details and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which the invention is shown by way of example. In the drawings,

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view showing a heating container for the preparation of cofiee,

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view showing a modification of the container of FIG. 1,

FIG. 3 is a top plan view showing the container of FIG. 1,

FIG. 4 is a horizontal sectional view showing the container of FIG. 1,

FIG. 5 shows a plurality of containers as shown in FIG. 1, which are nested for shipment,

FIG. 6 is a longitudinal sectional view showing another heating container,

FIG. 7 is a longitudinal sectional view showing a further heating container,

FIG. 8 is a longitudinal sectional view showing a heating container for beverages which can be stored when they have been prepared,

FIG. 9 is a longitudinal sectional view showing a different container for beverages which can be stored when they have been prepared,

FIG. 10 is a longitudinal sectional view showing a modification of the container shown in FIG. 9,

FIG. 11 is a view partly in transverse section showing the container according to FIG. 9.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view showing a detail of the container of FIG. 11,

FIG. 13 is a perspective view showing the container of FIG. 9,

FIG. 14 is a longitudinal sectional view showing another heating container in the shape of a bag,

FIG. 15 is a perspective view showing the container of FIG. 14,

FIG. 16 is a longitudinal sectional view showing a baglike container for beverages which can be stored when they have been prepared and FIG. 17 is a perspective view showing the container of FIG. 16.

With reference to FIGS. 1 to 5, an outer container 1 in the shape of an inverted cup is provided at its top with a hollow peripheral edge bead 2, which surrounds a central hump 3. The top of the hump 3 is below the top of the edge bead 2. The central portion of the hump 4 is formed by an upwardly convex diaphragm 4. The container 1 has an outwardly offset lower edge portion comprising a shoulder 5 succeeded by a depending rim The bead 2 has an enlarged portion 7, which is provided with a drinking slot 8. It is apparent from FIGS. 1 3, and 5 that the drinking slot is sealed by a sealing tab 9, which can be torn off and which in its sealing position covers also that portion 7 of the edge head 2 which is contacted by the mouth when drinking.

FIG. 2 shows a leaf 10, which covers and seals the entire edge bead, inclusive of the recess 11 which accommodates the hump 3. This leaf is provided with a tab 12 by which it can be torn ofi.

The outer container 1 is made from a suitable plastics material or another of the materials mentioned first hereinbefore, particularly from sheeting by deepdrawing, or may be made by injection molding. The container has corrigations at 13 to ensure an adequate stiffness in spite of a low wall thickness.

An insert 14, which has also the form of an inverted cup, is mounted in the outer container 1 from the underside. The insert 14 is formed with a plurality of steps and has a rim 15, which is liquid tightly secured to the shoulder 5 by heat sealing, welding or adhering. The insert 14 consists preferably of deep-drawn aluminum foil, which on the side facing the cavity 16 of the vessel or on both sides is coated with plastics material or heatsealable varnish to facilitate the connection to the shoulder 5 and to ensure that the taste of the beverage to be held in the cavity 16 will not be adversely affected.

A diaphragm 19, a separator 20 and an insulating layer 21 are secured to the outer flange l5 and the shoulders 17, 18 of the insert 14 also by welding, heat sealing or adhering. The diaphragm 19 consists of a foil of aluminum or the like and is preferably provided on the side facing the insert 14 with a coating of plastics material or heat-scalable varnish. The diaphragm 19, the separator 20 and the insulating layer 21 define compartments 23, 24 and 25. The compartment 23 accommodates a liquid reactant and the compartment 24 accommodates a solid and particularly pulverulent reactant for the exothermic reaction. For instance, the compartment 23 may be filled with a glycerine-water mixture and the compartment 24 with a blend of potassium permanganate, solid sorbitol, and silica gel. The separator 20 may consist of carton which on the side facing the insert 14 is coated, and is provided with perforations 22. The compartment 25 holds filtering and absorbent materials, such as silica gel. The insulating layer 21 may consist of non-woven cellulose fibers. There is also an outer layer 26, which consists of a sheeting of foamed plastics material and is provided with perforations. The outer layer 26 may be covered by a tear-off layer.

The hump 3 is closed at the bottom by a leaf 27, which consists preferably also of aluminum foil. In this way, an extract compartment 28 is defined, which contains an extract adapted to be added to the water which is contained in the cavity 16, or another sterilized liquid contained in said cavity, when said water or other liquid has been heated. FIGS. 1 and 2 show a coarsegrained solid extract although a liquid extract may also be used. The foil 27 is preferably coated with plastics material or heat-scalable varnish. A granular extract is preferably lyophilized to improve its solubility.

When the container is to be used, any leaf which covers the layer 26 and, in the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, the leaf are torn off. Pressure is then applied to the central portion of the layer 26 and to the diaphragm 4 from opposite sides to compress the container so that the leaf 27 and the diaphragm 19 are torn open, the extract from compartment 28 may become dissolved or suspended in the liquid contained in cavity 16, and the reactants for the exothermic reaction in compartments 23, 24 may mix to initiate the exothermic reaction. The entire container may be shaped to accelerate the dissolution of the extract and the exothermic reaction. The silica gel admixed to the solid reactant for the exothermic reaction in the compartment 24 acts as a wetting agent to accelerate the reaction. The exothermic reaction results in a formation of water and gases, which enter the filter compartment 25 in which they are mainly retained by the filter. Additional water and water vapor are absorbed by the insulating layer 21 consisting of non-woven cellulose fibers. Because gases and water vapor can escape, the exothermic reaction cannot result in dangerously high pressures. When the exothermic reaction has been completed, the extract from compartment 28 has been dissolved or suspended in the liquid contained in cavity 16 so that the hot beverage can be drunk through the drinking slot 8.

When the diaphragm 4 and the layer 26 have been forced inwardly, they do not entirely return to their initial position shown in the drawing so that it is apparent from the outside of the package whether one of the two reactions has been initiated, e.g., as a result of improper storage or handling. Such packages may be rejected before they are sold.

The extract which is contained in compartment 28 may be a coffee extract or an extract of coffee substitute, cafe au lait, coffein-free coffee or malt cofi'ee. Tea and cocoa beverages may also have components which are contained in the form of extract in compartment 28. For tea, the extract compartment 28 may directly form a tea bag, the perforations of which are torn open when the diaphragm 4 is depressed so that the heated liquid can contact the tea. Sweetening agents may normally be added directly to the extract. Alternatively, sweetening agents and other admixtures, which are only selectively used, may be accommodated in another compartment, which is separated from the compartment 28 and which by the actuation of an associated pressure trigger can be torn open for communication with the cavity 16 so that the user may add these admixtures to the beverage at his discretion. It is preferable to use synthetic sweetening agents based on cyclamates or saccharine because they require only little space. When a beverage is to be prepared which is always sweetened, the liquid in cavity 16 may be a sugar solution so that the exothermic reaction need not generate the heat of solution. Similarly, malt beverages, mixed alcoholic beverages, soups, broths etc. may be prepared as they are heated.

The heating container may be used to prepare a cof fee which has the typical appearance of Italian mocha or capuccino. These beverages are served with a foamed surface. For this purpose, a physiologically acceptable foaming agent, such as a small amount of tartaric acid, may be added to the extract or the liquid or this foaming agent may also be accommodated in a compartment which can be torn open by the actuation of a separate trigger. In the embodiment of FIG. 2, the leaf 10 consisting preferably of aluminum foil will also act to prevent a loss of the flavor of the extract contained in compartment 28.

Because the step 5 protrudes and has a square basic configuration, the heating container is supported on a large surface. Besides, a plurality of heating container may be nested for shipment within a small space, as is shown in FIG. 5.

The embodiment shown in FIG. 6 is basically similar to that of FIGS. 1 to 5. For this reason, the same reference characters are used for similar parts- In this case, the outer container 1a consists of a molding of foamed material, particularly foamed polystyrene. The wall of the outer container is formed with a recess 11, in which a drinking opening 29 and a venting opening 30 are provided. The entire hump 3a constitutes a diaphragm, which can be depressed and to which the bottom of a self-contained container 31 defining the extract compartment 28 is secured. The container 31 is closed by a leaf 32. When the diaphragm 3a is depressed, the entire container 31, 32 is displaced and the sealing leaf 32 is forced against the insert 14 and is thus torn open. The insulating layer 21, 26 is disposed in a recess in the bottom. The container bottom is protected by a metal foil 33, which can be torn open and which just as the leaf 10, 12 is torn off before the container is used, i.e., before the exothermic reaction is initiated. The leaves 10, 33 protect the container also during shipment from an unintended initiation of the exothermic reaction or a dissolution of the extract from the compartment 28 in the liquid contained in the inner cavity 16. If the leaf 10 is elastically extensible, the diaphragm may be actuated even when the leaf 10 is still in sealing condition. This has the advantage that an undesired escape of liquid from the cavity 16 before the drinking operation is prevented. The two leaves 10, 33 substantially improve the shelf life of the entire heating container.

FIG. 7 shows a heating container which comprises a cup-shaped outer container 34 having a wide depending rim 35. The bottom of the outer container 34 is formed with an annular bead 36, which protrudes over a central hump 37, which again constitutes a diaphragm and by a sealing leaf 38 is closed and separated from the inner cavity 39 of the vessel. An extract compartment 40 is thus defined, which contains a cup-shaped insert 41, which has a rim facing the leaf 38 and formed with sawtoothlike knife edges 42. When the diaphragm 37 is depressed, the knife edges 42 cut through the leaf 38 and expand the same so that the liquid from the cavity 39 can dissolve or suspend the extract contained in the compartment 40. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 7, the heating insert consists of a sealing cover of the outer container. That cover has a sealing leaf 43, which extends around the rim 35 and is liquidand gastightly joined to that rim. The leaf 43 can be removed by means of a tear-off tab 44 and is covered on top by a heat-lagging layer 45, e.g., of Styropor foamed material. The leaf 43 carries an insert body 46, which protrudes into the container 34 and which is formed at its bottom 47 with corrugations 48 to improve the heat transfer. The insert is closed at the top by two leaves 50, which are disposed one over the other and define between them a space 49. The insert is filled with a supersaturated solution of a recrystallizable material, such as sodium acetate. That material was liquefied by superheating before it was filled into the insert. The space 49 contains sharp-edged crystals of the same or a different material. When the cover or diaphragm 37 is depressed, the knife edges 42 will cut through the foil 38 so that the liquid from the cavity 39 can dissolve the extract contained in the compartment 40. This dissolving operation can be improved in that the cup 41 is performated and the hump comprises beads 51, which reinforce the hump. As a result, the liquid will be conducted quickly to all parts of the extract. The leaf 50 facing the compartment 52 is torn open at the same time. When the sharp-edged crystals enter the compartment 52, the supersaturated solution therein recrystallizes without evolution of gas or vapor and without change in volume and the heat of crystallization is transferred through the wall of the insert 46 to the liquid contained in cavity 39. The wall of the insert 46 consists preferably of coated aluminum. When the liquid has been heated, the tear-off tab 44 is pulled to remove the cover and the heating insert. The rim 35 then forms a drinking rim of the open container.

FIG. 8 shows a tinor can-shaped outer container 53, which is closed at its top by an insert cover 54, which is formed with a drinking opening 56 and a vent opening 57. The openings 56 and 57 are mutually opposite and sealed by tear-off closures 55. The insert cover has such a shape that the protruding rim 58 constitutes a drinking rim. The inner cavity 59 of the container should contain a beverage which can be stored when it has been prepared, e.g., a soup. The bottom of the container 53 consists of a heating insert, which is basically similar to the heating insert 14 of FIGS. 1 to 6. For this reason, the same reference characters are used. Because the container 53 has probably a larger cubic capacity, the heating insert 60 is correspondingly larger only in diameter than in the embodiment described before. To improve the heat transfer to the liquid contained in cavity 59, that wall of the insert 60 which adjoins the compartment 23 is formed with corrugations 61. The container 53 is preferably made from aluminum-coated carton or another of the materials mentioned hereinbefore and the cover 54 and the insert 60 are preferably made from coated aluminum foil.

The top surface of the insulating layer 21 contacts a cup-shaped cutting device 62, which again carries sawtoothlike cutting edges 63, which extend through a common opening 64 of the separator or are disposed below the separator 20 in position of rest. When the bottom of the container is depressed, the knife edges 63 penetrate the foil 19 at numerous points so that the exothermic reaction begins quickly virtually throughout the heating inserts in chambers 23, 24. The foil 19 and the separator 20 may be preformed with perforations in register with the knife edges and these perforations will be closed by a subsequently applied coating until the bottom is depressed.

FIGS. 9-13 show heating containers 65, 66 which are cubic or rectangular in their basic configuration. A cubic shape has the basic advantage that such containers can easily be made on corresponding machines and the machines may be altered for making containers for different purposes. FIGS. 9 and 13 show a cubic container 65 for beverages which can be stored when they have been prepared. These beverages are contained in the inner cavity 67. In FIG. 9, two opposite ends of the cubic container are closed by heating inserts 68, which correspond to the inserts l4. Alternatively, only one end may be provided with a heating insert and the opposite end wall may be closed by a flush inserted closure plate or an extract compartment 28 or 40 may be provided instead of the heating insert 68. The side wall of the cubic outer container is formed with a drinking opening 70, which is sealed by a tearopen tab 69. The package shown in FIGS. 9 and 13 having a given basic shape may be used for different purposes by the provision of different inserts.

The embodiment shown in FIGS. 10, 11, and 12 is a modification of the same basic concept. In this case, extract compartments may be provided not only at one end but at up to three side walls of the package. One side wall 71 is provided with the-side wall seam 72 and with a drinking opening 73, which is protected by a tear-off tab 74. The other side walls of the container may contain inserts. FIG. 11 shows an insert 76, which is inserted in an opening in a side wall and contains an extract compartment 79 defined between two leaves 77, 78. That extract compartment may contain an admixture which is to be added to the contents of the vessel only when this is desired. Such admixture may consist, eg. of a sweetening agent, a milk extract or a foaming agent for the preparation of coffee. When the extract contained in the extract cavity 79 is to be added to the contents of the container, pressure is applied to the outer leaf 77 so that the leaf 78 is torn open. All side walls of the package may be enclosed by a protecting leaf, which can be torn open before the container is used. The side walls of the container may be increased in length so that the package has the form of a square prism. In this way, the cubic capacity can be increased but the package may still be handled on the same packaging machines.

FIGS. 14 and 15 show a heating container in the form of a block bottom bag. The bottom consists of a heating insert 80, which corresponds to the insert 14 and to which a suitably folded bag 81 is liquidtightly joined. The forward and rear walls 82, 83 of the bag may be provided on the inside with leaves 84 joined by heat sealing so that these walls are hollow and comprise extract compartments 85. Adjacent to the top edge, a seam 86 is provided which extends from the outer edge only to a drinking opening 87. Transverse series of perforations are provided adjacent to the drinking opening. The edge of the bag can be torn open along these series of perforations by means of a tab 88 to expose the drinking opening.

According to FIGS. 16 and 17, the bottom of a bag consists also of a heating insert 89, which comprises an inner shell 90. A leaf 91 forming the bag is liquidtightly joined to the edge of the inner shell. The leaf 91 is formed with a drinking opening 92, which is sealed by a tear-off tab 93. The inner shell 90 is provided with knobs 94 or similar protruberances, which ensure that the exothermic reaction can be initiated virtually throughout the entire heating insert and be accelerated in that the insulating layer 26 is depressed at several points.

What is claimed is: 1. A heating container for producing a hot liquid preparation, which container comprises a vessel having an aluminum metal foil boundary wall defining a cavity which contains a liquid, the aluminum foil having a coating of plastics material on the side facing said cavity, a

a heating insert in heat-conducting relation with said cavity, said insert defining a heating compartment adjoining said boundary wall and containing a heat-delivering substance which is capable of performing an exothermic reaction, the boundary wall separating the heating compartment from the cavity, and

an outer drinking container which contains said vessel and insert,

said outer container and vessel consisting of a heatresisting material which consists at least in part of plastics material.

2. A heating container as set forth in claim 1, in which said boundary wall has a corrugated portion which separates said heating compartment and cavity.

3. A heating container as set forth in claim 1, in which said outer container is formed with an inwardly extending recess containing said heating compartment.

4. A heating container as set forth in claim 3, in which said outer container has a bottom formed with said recess.

5. A heating container as set forth in claim 1, in which said boundary wall is formed with an inwardly extending recess containing said heating compartment.

6. A heating container as set forth in claim 1, in which said boundary wall comprises a cover, which contains said heating compartment.

7. A heating container as set forth in claim 1, in which said outer container has a generally square, protruding edge flange.

8. A heating container as set forth in claim 1, in which said outer container has generally the form of a cup.

9. A heating container as set forth in claim 1, in which said outer container consists of transparent plastics material.

10. A heating container as set forth in claim 1, in which said outer container consists of deep-drawn plastics material.

11. A heating container as set forth in claim 1, in which said outer container consists of foamed polystyrene provided with a liquidtight inside coating.

12. A heating container as set forth in claim 11, in which said outer container is injection-molded.

13. A heating container as set forth in claim 12, in which said outer container consists of deep-drawn foamed polystyrene sheeting.

14. A heating container for producing a hot liquid preparation, which container comprises a vessel having a boundary wall defining a cavity which contains a liquid,

a heating insert in heat-conducting relation with said cavity, said insert defining a heating compartment adjoining said boundary wall,

partition means dividing said compartment into a plurality of sub-compartments and said sub-compartments containing respective components of a heat-delivering substance which, when contacting each other, are capable of performing an exothermic reaction,

trigger means operable to establish a communication between said sub-compartments, and

an outer drinking container which contains said vessel and insert,

said outer container and vessel consisting of a heatresisting material which consists at least in part of plastics material.

15. A heating container as set forth in claim 14, in

which said partition means comprise a leaf and i said outer container comprises a wall portion which is spaced outwardly from said leaf and resiliently depressible to cause said leaf to become torn open.

16. A heating container as set forth in claim 15, in which said wall portion consists of an outwardly cambered, prestressed diaphragm which when depressed tends to remain in a depressed position to indicate that the exothermic reaction has been initiated.

17. A heating container as set forth in claim 15, in which said outer container comprises wall portions which surround and outwardly protrude said resiliently depressible wall portion.

18. A heating container as set forth in claim 15, in which said leaf has preformed perforations sealed by a coating and a cutting device is provided, which is coupled to said resiliently depressible wall portion and comprises knife edges in register with said perforations and adapted to be forced into said perforations when said resiliently depressible wall portion is depressed.

19. A heating container as set forth in claim 14, in

which said components are glycerine and potassium permanganate, respectively, and

sorbitol is admixed to at least one of said components in the same state of matter as said one component.

20. A heating container for producing a hot liquid preparation, which container comprises a vessel having a boundary wall defining a cavity which contains a liquid,

a heating insert in heat-conducting relation with said cavity, said insert defining a heating compartment adjoining said boundary wall and containing a heat-delivering substance which is capable of performing an exothermic reaction,

an outer drinking container which contains said vessel and insert,

said outer container and vessel consisting of a heatresisting material which consists at least in part of plastics material, and

heat-lagging layers between said heating compartment and the outside of said container.

21. A heating container for producing a hot liquid preparation, which container comprises a vessel having a boundary wall defining a cavity which contains a liquid,

a heating insert in heat-conducting relation with said cavity, said insert defining a heating compartment adjoining said boundary wall and containing a heat-delivering substance which is capable of performing an exothermic reaction,

an outer drinking container which contains said vessel and insert,

said outer container and vessel consisting of a heatresisting material which consists at least in part of plastics material, and

means defining an expansion compartment disposed between said heating compartment and the outside of said container,

said means comprising means for providing a communication between said expansion compartment and said heating compartment when said exothermic reaction has been initiated, and filter means disposed between said expansion compartment and the outside of said container.

22. A heating container as set forth in claim 21, in which said outer container is formed with a recess, which contains said heating compartment, expansion compartment and filter.

23. A heating container for producing a hot liquid preparation, which container comprises a vessel having a boundary wall defining a cavity which contains a liquid,

a heating insert in heat-conducting relation with said cavity, said insert defining a heating compartment adjoining said boundary wall,

partition means dividing said heating compartment into a plurality of sub-compartments containing respective components of a heat-delivering substance which, when contacting each other, are capable of performing an exothermic reaction,

an outer drinking container which contains said vessel and insert,

said outer container and vessel consisting of a heatresisting material which consists at least in part of plastics material,

said container being formed with a plurality of steps defining a recess which contains said heating compartment,

filter means disposed between said heating compartment and the outside of said container, and

said partition means and filter meanshaving edge portions secured to said steps.

24. A heating container for producing a hot liquid preparation, which container comprises a vessel having a boundary wall defining a cavity which contains a liquid,

a heating insert in heat-conducting relation with said cavity, said insert defining a heating compartment adjoining said boundary wall and containing a heat-delivering substance which is capable of performing an exothermic reaction,

an outer drinking container which contains said vessel and insert,

said outer container and vessel consisting of a heatresisting material which consists at least in part of plastics material,

said outer container is formed with a recess, which contains said heating compartment and said recess is gasand liquidtightly sealed on the outside by a sealing leaf adapted to be torn open.

25. A heating container for producing a hot liquid preparation, which container comprises a vessel having a boundary wall defining a cavity which contains a liquid,

a heating insert in heat-conducting relation with said cavity, said insert defining a heating compartment adjoining said boundary wall and containing a heat-delivering substance which is capable of performing an exothermic reaction,

an outer drinking container which contains said vessel and insert,

said outer container and vessel consisting of a heatresisting material which consists at least in part of plastics material,

a filter disposed between said heating compartment and the outside of said container and comprising an inner layer of silica gel, an intermediate nonwoven layer of cellulose fibers, and an outer layer of foamed polystyrene.

26. A heating container for producing a hot liquid preparation which container comprises a vessel having a boundary wall defining a cavity which contains a liquid,

a heating insert in heat-conducting relation wifii said cavity, said insert defining a heating compartment adjoining said boundary wall and containing a heat-delivering substance which is capable of performing an exothermic reaction,

an outer drinking container which contains said vessel and insert,

said outer container and vessel consisting of a heatresisting material which consists at least in part of plastics material,

a partition defining in said vessel an admixture oompartment and separating said admixture compartment from said cavity,

a trigger which is operable from the outside of the container to tear open said partition, and

a closure which covers said trigger on the outside of said container and is adapted to be torn off to expose said trigger.

27. A heating container as set forth in claim 26, which comprises means for initiating said exothermic reaction in response to the operation of said trigger.

28. A heating container as set forth in claim 26, which comprises a second partition defining in said vessel a second admixture compartment and a second trigger which is operable from the outside of the container independently of said first-mentioned trigger to tear open said second partition.

29. A heating container as set forth in claim 26, in which said admixture compartment contains a coarsegrained admixture and said outer container comprises a resiliently depressible wall portion constituting said trigger.

30. A heating container as set forth in claim 26, in which said trigger comprises a resiliently depressible diaphragm, which is preformed in cambered shape and adapted to remain in a position to which it is depressed.

31. A heating container as set forth in claim 26, in which said trigger comprises a resiliently depressible wall portion of said outer container,

said outer container is formed with a recess defined by said resiliently depressible wall portion, and

of said recesses.

said outer container is provided with a tear-off leaf 5 covering said recess.

32. A heating container as set forth in claim 26, in which said outer container comprises two mutually opposite, inwardly extending recesses, respectively containing said heating compartment and trigger.

33. A heating container as set forth in claim 26, in which said outer container has generally the form of a rectangular prism having side and end walls formed with recesses respectively containing said heating compartment and said trigger.

34. A heating container as set forth in claim 33, in which one of said side walls is formed with a drinking opening which communicates with said cavity, and said side walls are provided with a tear-off strip covering said drinking opening and said recesses.

35. A heating container as set forth in claim 33, in which said heating insert is detachably mounted in one 36. A heating container as set forth in claim 26, in

which said vessel is formed with an inwardly extending recess containing said partition and a detachable insert containing said admixture compartment.

37. A heating container for producing a hot liquid preparation which container comprises a vessel having a boundary wall defining a cavity which contains a liquid,

a heating insert in heat-conducting relation with said cavity, said insert defining a heating compartment adjoining said boundary wall and containing a heat-delivering substance which is capable of performing an exothermic reaction,

an outer drinking container which contains said vessel and insert,

said outer container and vessel consisting of a heatresisting material which consists at least in part of plastics material, which said outer container consists of a bag having a bottom, which comprises said heating insert and a trigger which is operable to initiate said exothermic reaction.

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Classifications
Classification aux États-Unis126/263.7, 126/262
Classification internationaleB65D81/34, A47G23/00, A47G23/04, A47J36/28, A47J36/24
Classification coopérativeA47J36/28, B65D81/3484
Classification européenneB65D81/34S, A47J36/28